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Project Stories

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Helping Former Soldiers Find Jobs
Demobilization of soldiers in the late 1990s left many young men unemployed and without the skills necessary to find jobs. This presented a social and political challenge for the new country. What the former soldiers needed was training to improve their chances of finding a job in a market economy. 

The World Bank stepped forward with a US$15 million package to provide some 7,000 discharged soldiers with the skills to reintegrate into society. More...

Modernizing Lending Procedures
In a country with two entities and one smaller jurisdiction—The Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Republika Srpska, and the district of Brcko—a maze of legislation sometimes hinders the development of businesses.

But a new secured financing system and recent bankruptcy legislation, developped under the Business Adjustment Credit program, is helping create a better business environment. More... 

Mostar bridge

micro-credit auto mechanic

   

Mostar's Bridge Rises Again
Tens of thousands of people packed the old cobblestone-covered streets of Mostar to witness an historic event – the official opening of the new Old Bridge.

The World Bank Group, through IDA, financed one-third of the cost of the restoration.The Bank saw the bridge as "an extraordinary opportunity for reconciliation among the peoples of Bosnia-Herzegovina.” More...

   

Small Loans Boost Incomes   
After the war ended in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1995, unemployment reached 70 to 80 percent, and the population grappled with both post-war reconstruction and the emerging market economy.

Microcredit offered the promise of helping poor people get back on their feet. Two Local Initiatives Projects launched in 1996 and 2002 helped small entrepreneurs all over the country start anew. More... 

 
 

 

 

 

Improving Medical Treatment
Access to quality treatment is an acute problem for residents of Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where kidney disease is endemic.

The International Dialysis Center BV of the Netherlands injected several million dollars into a new, state-of-the-art dialysis facility in the city of Banja Luka. The Multilateral Guarantee Agency (MIGA), an arm of the World Bank Group, made the investment possible. More...

Milada Stocks Up
During the war, a grenade hit and devastated Milada Macanovic’s family business. Today her grocery store in Konjic is rebuilt and stocked with goods.

Milada is one of many beneficiaries of the World Bank’s Local Initiatives Project who are slowly putting their lives back together thanks to small loans. More...

From 'Mattress Money' to Mortgages
At the end of the war in 1995, few banks operated in Bosnia. People mistrusted banks and the banking sector—the lynchpin of a well-functioning economy—was in a state of crisis.

Today, the sector stands transformed. An influx of activity by foreign banks, purchasing locally owned banks or starting anew, has brought a vibrancy and competitive edge to the moribund industry, spurring a wide range of new economic and consumer activity. More...

 

Read alsoRebuilding Communities by Involving the People

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