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The World Bank and Roma Inclusion

THE WORLD BANK AND ROMA INCLUSION
Replicating Roma Success Stories in Bulgaria

Replicating Roma Success Stories in Bulgaria

Dimitrinka works part-time as a health mediator in the Bulgarian village where she grew up while studying to be a nurse in the capital, Sofia. The twenty-six year old knows she's bucking the odds: fewer than half of one percent of Bulgarian Roma obtain degrees in higher education.
Empowering Romania's Roma in Their Villages

Empowering Romania's Roma in Their Villages

Simona Persida Negru is washing clothes by hand at her Romanian village's water fountain. After she wrings them out, she will push the wet clothes home in her wheelbarrow. It's hard, but not as hard as carrying water in buckets from a stream up a muddy hill to her house.
Including Romania's Marginalized Societies

Including Romania's Marginalized Societies

Costel Arsene works on heavy machinery by day, but on his afternoons off he helps neighborhood kids do their homework in a community center for Roma. His 13 year-old daughter is doing a lot better in school since she started coming to the center when it opened not far from her house two years ago.
In Kosovo: Helping Businesses and Communities Help Themselves

In Kosovo: Helping Businesses and Communities Help Themselves

For three war widows in Kosovo, the money allows them to get as much work done in a week as they used to do in a month.
New World Bank Report Calls for Financial Inclusion of Roma in Eastern Europe through a Comprehensive, Incremental Approach

New World Bank Report Calls for Financial Inclusion of Roma in Eastern Europe through a Comprehensive, Incremental Approach

A new World Bank report "Reducing Vulnerability and Promoting the Self-Employment of Roma in Eastern Europe Through Financial Inclusion," finds that financial inclusion can help improve the lives of marginalized Roma communities in Eastern Europe.
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Build Evidence & Provide Policy LessonsWorld Bank Lending for Inclusion Projects

Roma InclusionRoma exclusion remains a great development challenge for Europe. The vast majority of Roma live in deep poverty. Low skill levels - fewer than 1 in 4 complete upper secondary – coupled with frequent segregation and discrimination lead to extremely low employment, especially among women. Average labor productivity among Roma is comparable to that of some of the poorest countries in the world.

Demographics and labor market exclusion make Roma inclusion also a macroeconomic necessity. While majority populations are aging and the overall labor force is shrinking, Roma populations are young and growing, already making up to one-fifth of new labor market entrants in some Eastern European countries.

There is a great opportunity to close the gap. First, there is now much needed comprehensive data through a joint effort in 2011 by the European Commission, UNDP, the Fundamental Rights Agency, and the World Bank. Data that show that the vast majority of Roma parents want their children to go far in school, and want to work in steady jobs, like their non-Roma neighbors. Second, there is increasing evidence on what works such as focused efforts to close the pre-school gap. And, third, Roma integration is considered an integral part of the EU2020 Strategy, and makes considerable resources available for inclusion through its Structural Funds.

The World Bank and Roma inclusion. Since co-founding the Decade of Roma inclusion (2005) and the Roma Education Fund (2005), the World Bank continues to support Roma inclusion efforts through advocacy and evidence based analysis Decade of Roma Inclusion, and designing Roma Education Fund, sometimes coupled with investment lending.

Partners

Decade of Roma InclusionEuropean CommissionRoma Education Fund
Open Society FoundationsUNICEFUNDP