Click here for search results

Shared Views on Development and Climate Change

Shared Views on Development and Climate Change

This document builds upon the World Bank’s Strategic Framework for Development and Climate Change that defines the pillars and priorities to the climate challenge. The document identifies the common principles that have gained wide acceptance in addressing climate threats in South Asia.

Download Report

Executive Summary

High population densities, a large concentration of poverty, and the region's climate variability have all combined to make South Asia especially sensitive to the consequences of climate change. Climate change has the potential to compound existing development problems and increase pressures on key resources needed to sustain future growth, urbanization and industrialization.

Download Executive Summary (pdf)

Download Full Report (pdf)

Download Full Report in Color (~12 MB) (pdf)

Chapter 2: Climate Change: The Global Scene

This chapter begins with a brief overview of the problem, the scientific underpinnings, the certainties and uncertainties, and the likely effects of future climate change. It describes what climate change means, why it matters, and why it is not strictly an environmental issue, but is also a crucial development concern. It then outlines the contribution of sectors and countries to greenhouse gas emissions and the various approaches for stabilizing emissions.

Download Chapter 2 (pdf)

Chapter 3: The Regional Scene

Geography coupled with high levels of poverty and population density has rendered South Asia especially vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. The region faces daunting climate-related development challenges.

Download Chapter 3 (pdf)

Chapter 4: The Way Forward

Development under climate constraints demands a dual approach. Adaptation is necessary to limit the damage caused by climate change. It enables communities to preempt and manage climate risks and allows governments to protect and "climate-proof" high value assets and infrastructure. Mitigation is also vital since no amount of adaptation planning can protect economies from the potentially catastrophic impacts of climate change.

Download Chapter 4 (pdf)

Part II: Sectoral Context and Outlook

The document advocates an integrated approach to address the impact of climate change on agriculture, ecological resources, health, infrastructure, livelihoods, and natural disasters. South Asia's heavy reliance on agriculture provides an important lesson. The impact of climate change on agriculture cannot be decoupled from water resources, floods, drought, and economic structure. These interact in ways that determine vulnerabilities, impacts and adaptation opportunities. The chapters 5-14 identify the many cross-sectoral and regional linkages.

Download Part II (pdf)

 

Data

Data

Climate Change & South Asia

- South Asia's population is projected to rise from 1.48 billion (2005) - 2.22 billion (2050).

- In 2008, an estimated 600 million South Asians subsisting on less than US$1.25 a day.

- About 70 percent of South Asians live in rural areas and account for about 75 percent of the poor.

- South Asia is extremely vulnerable to natural disasters, with over 900 events reported since 1970.

- 60 percent of Bangladesh is flood prone.

- Between 1990 and 2008, South Asia lost about US$45 billion in damages due to natural disasters.

(« expand)

Data

Data

Climate Change & South Asia

- South Asia's population is projected to rise from 1.48 billion (2005) - 2.22 billion (2050).

- In 2008, an estimated 600 million South Asians subsisting on less than US$1.25 a day.

- About 70 percent of South Asians live in rural areas and account for about 75 percent of the poor.

- South Asia is extremely vulnerable to natural disasters, with over 900 events reported since 1970.

- 60 percent of Bangladesh is flood prone.

- Between 1990 and 2008, South Asia lost about US$45 billion in damages due to natural disasters.

- South Asia contain 16 percent of floral and 12 percent of faunal species found in the world.

- Coral coverage in South Asia has declined from more than 40 percent in 1997 to slightly above 20 percent in 2002.

- India’s rate of car ownership in 2000 was just 10 vehicles per 1,000 persons, compared to a worldwide average of about 113 vehicles per 1000 persons.

(collapse »)




Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/DEOKW48F50