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FAQs


1.
Does Web Archives include all older Bank sites?
2.
Why are there so many Bank sites?
3.
Why are some PDFs not available?
4.
Why are some images not displayed?
5.
Can I use “/”, “-“, and other symbols when searching?
6.
Why are there multiple sites on the same topic?
7.
Which sites are archived into the Web Archives?
8.
How can I use archived sites?
9.
Where can I see older Bank sites that are not in WebArchives?
10.
Why was the Web Archives created?
11.
What is the Web Archives?
12.
Is the archived site an exact, working replica of the original?
13.
How can I search the Web Archives?
14.
What is the difference between the Web Archives and the live Bank site?
15.
How are websites archived?
16.
What does “Not Archived” page mean?
  
1.

Does Web Archives include all older Bank sites?

 

No. Only sites that, in the Bank’s view, have research or historic value are archived.

 

2.

Why are there so many Bank sites?

 

The World Bank has one main site at www.worldbank.org. However, within this main site there are many "sub-sites,” such as www.worldbank.org/jobs, that we treat as stand-alone sites for archiving purposes.

 

3.

Why are some PDFs not available?

 

When archiving a site, the crawler may have encountered a technical problem when trying to copy a PDF. The file may have been “corrupted” or is no longer available.

 

4.

Why are some images not displayed?

 

When archiving a site, crawler may have encountered a technical problem when trying to copy an image. The file may have been “corrupted” or is no longer available. Also, copyright issues or some other non-technical impediment may have prevented us from displaying that image on the site.

 

5.

Can I use “/”, “-“, and other symbols when searching?

 

No, at this time you can only type in words to do a search. We are working to improve the search functions of WebArchives to enable you use these signs in the future.

 

6.

Why are there multiple sites on the same topic?

 

These might be versions of the same site created in deferent times. Many Bank sites went through several redesigns and major updates. WebArchives tries to capture each new version of the same site throughout its lifetime. For example, you may be looking for a Nigeria country site. Instead, you may see two such sites available. It means that the site was redesigned or had a major update three times and we have a copy of each version of the Nigeria country site.

 

7.

Which sites are archived into the Web Archives?

 

When a Bank site is being replaced with a new site or is being redesigned or updated, a Bank archivist evaluates it to determine its suitability for capture into WebArchives. The evaluation includes an analysis of the site's research or historical value. If a site is found to have such value, it will be archived.

 

8.

How can I use archived sites?

 

You can browse and search an archived site like any other Bank site. Both the Bank’s archived sites and its main www.worldbank.org site have the same terms and conditions of use, which you can view here. However, always remember that you are looking at an archived site and the information on that site is no longer updated! If you need to find up-to-date information about the Bank, please visit its main site.

 

9.

Where can I see older Bank sites that are not in WebArchives?

 

You may try Internet Archive or other sites on the Internet that take snapshots of major sites like the Bank's. The Bank does not have any other collection that may contain such sites. If the site you are looking for is not available on the Internet, and is not in WebArchives, then it is likely no longer available.

 

10.

Why was the Web Archives created?

 

The World Bank used to have sites using many technical platforms, hosted by various companies, and used different designs. Since the Bank moved to a centralized platform, older sites are being permanently removed and are no longer available to external users. However, many of these older sites retain a value for research and historical purposes. For that reason, the Bank decided to offer these sites to its external users as a separate online collection. In addition, the main Bank site is being updated on a regular basis, so taking snapshots of the entire domain allows users the ability to track the site developments and review some of its older content.

 

11.

What is the Web Archives?

 

The Web Archives is an online collection of the World Bank’s older Web sites. It contains:

  • sites that have been replaced due to design, technological or other changes,
  • sites that are no longer being updated, and
  • snapshots of selected live sites
 

12.

Is the archived site an exact, working replica of the original?

 

No. Some pages that should have been copied as part of the site may have fallen outside of the definition of the crawling software's snapshot filter. As well, server errors at the time of the snapshot may have prevented the downloading of certain pages or files. In those instances, users will be notified with a warning page or icon as they browse through the archived site.

Furthermore, any functionality or features of the original site that depended on the availability of a back-end database, application server or server-side scripting will not be available. For example, a shopping cart application or a search box that appears in the archived site will not be functional. Within the Web archiving community, the term ‘deep web’ is used to describe this category of dynamic Web content and the limited ability to support it within archives.

 

13.

How can I search the Web Archives?

 

There are several search options:

  • To search for an archived site using one or two keywords , type these keywords into the search box on the WebArchives homepage banner or into the box on the page. These searches have similar configuration and will give the same results. They go through description of the archived sites (also called site “metadata”) and display those that have the search term in one or more metadata fields.
  • If you have two or more search criteria, it is recommended to use  Advanced Search , which allows you to search on up to 10 criteria, such as language, region, site description and others. This search also goes against the description of the archived sites (site “metadata”) and will retrieve sites that have the search term in corresponding metadata fields For example, if you select to search for sites in Spanish, the search engine will look in the archived site metadata field of language and retrieve only sites that are described as being in Spanish.
  • If you need to search for content within an archived site, you may use the “Search This Archived Site” option available from the ARCHIVED WEBSITE banner. This banner is always available when you browse an archived site.

Many archived sites have their own search boxes. These search options usually do not work. This is a known limitation of Web archiving in general and industry specialists are looking for solutions. However, if you need to search content of a specific archived site, locate that site in the WebArchives collection, click on the hyperlinked name of the site to view it, and search for its content using the “Search This Archived Site” search option available from the ARCHIVED WEBSITE banner.

If you need more information on how to search this site, please click on Help.

 

14.

What is the difference between the Web Archives and the live Bank site?

 

Sites included in the WebArchives collection are static snapshots that represent a point-in-time capture for reference purposes. They have limited functionality beyond basic hyperlinking and the content is no longer being updated. The main Bank site at www.worldbank.org is updated on a regular basis and has the latest information about the Banka’s work in different regions, countries and economic sectors.

 

15.

How are websites archived?

 

Due to their complex logical structures and the widespread use of dynamically generated content and links, the current best practice is to use a 'crawling' or 'mirroring' technique. Web crawling or mirroring software is used to create a static ‘snapshot’ of a site by requesting and downloading all pages and files that are hyperlinked from a given starting point (e.g. the site's homepage URL) to a predefined hyperlink depth (e.g. a maximum of five hyperlinks from the homepage). This creates an offline copy of the site content that is organized into a stand-alone, relative directory structure that can be maintained on its own, separate from the original site's infrastructure. Access to these archived sites is then provided from the WebArchives site. They display an ARCHIVED WEBSITE banner.

 

16.

What does “Not Archived” page mean?

 

This page means that the page that you were trying to view was not archived. When archiving a site, we follow the site directory structure. For example, all content located in the http://worldbank.org/samplesite/ directory is considered to be one “site” for archiving purposes. If this archived site links to another site (directory), that other site is usually not archived. When you browse an archived site and click on a link that refers to such other site, a “Not Archived” page will be displayed. Follow the instructions on that page to choose from the options it offers -- go back to the archived site you were browsing or see whether the not archived page is live. There may also be technical reasons why the page was not archived. Database-driven applications, Java script and other known limitations of Web archiving may have prevented us from capturing that page. If this is the case, you will see a Not Archived page displayed.

 




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