Click here for search results

Partnerships with Faith-Based Organizations

Partnerships


DDVE has developed partnerships and joint work with a number of faith-based organizations. Some of the main organizations with which DDVE has worked over the years include the following (the links provided below will take you to the organizations’ own web sites):

The World Faiths Development Dialogue was created to bridge between the worlds of faith-based and mainstream development with support from the World Bank. Established in 2000 by James D. Wolfensohn, former World Bank President and Lord George Carey, former Archbishop of Canterbury, WFDD supports dialogue and fosters research on religion and development. Information on joint work and projects between DDVE and WFDD is available at World Faiths Development Dialogue.

The Community of Sant’Egidio is a Catholic lay movement active globally in areas of interfaith understanding, peace and reconciliation, and HIV/AIDS. Sant’Egidio helped broker the peace negotiations in Mozambique, and is currently active in numerous conflict situations worldwide, including the ongoing efforts in Northern Uganda. The movement has won numerous prizes, including the Balkan Prize (2004) and has been a Nobel Peace Prize nominee. Sant’Egidio hosts an annual “Prayer for Peace,” a prominent global interfaith meeting raising issues of global development, in which DDVE has participated. On HIV/AIDS, Sant’Egidio received TAP funding in Mozambique for the Community’s HIV/AIDS treatment program. The World Bank and Sant’Egidio signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 2003 outlining areas of common concern and possible collaboration.

Fe y Alegria is a confederation of Jesuit schools targeting disadvantaged youth and serving more than 1.2 million students in 17 Latin American countries.  DDVE will be organizing in the fall of 2009 a seminar in collaboration with the World Bank Institute, CAF (the Corporación Andina de Fomento) and Magis America for Fe y Alegria and government staff from 15 Latin American countries to assess the performance of Fe y Alegria schools and discuss some of the school’s innovative programs.

The Fès Colloquium was initially conceived as a modest event at the periphery of the annual Fes Festival of World Sacred Music in Morocco, the Colloquium has grown to a global forum on probing issues of ethics, globalization, and poverty, and their ties to the Arab World, Europe, and beyond. Participants at the annual event include politicians, scientists, scholars, artists, development practitioners, and business leaders. Past colloquia participation have focused on central topics of education, cultural heritage, youth, and memory. Institutional partners in the forum have included the European Union, the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, the Moroccan government, and the World Bank’s DDVE.

The International Movement ATD Fourth World was founded in 1957 in France by a Catholic Priest, Joseph Wresinski (1914-1988). ATD is a non-confessional, non-profit grass-roots and advocacy organization at the origin of the United Nations’ World day for overcoming poverty (October 17). Today, ATD runs projects with the very poor in about twenty five developed and developing countries. ATD also aims at representing the poorest in national and international forums. The organization has been granted consultative status 1 with the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) at the United Nations.

The Women, Faith and Development Alliance (WFDA) was launched in April 2008 as a partnership between international development, faith, and women’s organizations committed to dialogue and advocacy on issues of gender equity. The lead organizational sponsors are Women Thrive Worldwide, the World Conference of Religions for Peace, InterAction, and Washington National Cathedral’s Center for Global Justice and Reconciliation. With the support of more than 70 organizations, WFDA’s goal is twofold: to bridge chasms that have existed between faith, development, and women’s organizations active in parallel and complementary areas, and to form a coalition to advocate for concerted financial commitment and policy on gender issues. DDVE provided in 2007 funding to WFDA for its dissemination and outreach efforts, including the production of a short video on empowering women.

The World Conference of Religions for Peace (WCRP) is an international coalition or representatives of global religious traditions committed to peace and development. Recent WCRP global fora have focused on contributions and partnerships of faith leaders and communities to achieve the MDGs. At the country-level, WCRP convenes Inter-Religious Councils of local religious leaders to undertake work on a range of initiatives, including gender, legal empowerment, conflict transformation, children and youth, sustainable development, human rights, and peace education, inter alia. DDVE participated and provided funding in 2007 to WFDA for its dissemination and outreach efforts, including the production of a short video on empowering women, and convening a high level working group to move the initiative forward.

The World Council of Churches (WCC) brings together 349 churches, denominations and church fellowships in more than 110 countries and territories representing over 560 million Christians. Part of the broader Geneva-based ecumenical movement, the WCC is engaged in issues relating to poverty reduction, including in areas such as trade liberalization, governance, and post-conflict. Since 2002, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund have been engaged in an ongoing dialogue with the WCC. Termed “encounters,” these meetings have examined issues around institutional governance and accountability, participation of civil society in development processes, the respective roles of the public and private sector in poverty alleviation, and the challenges of globalization. Through this dialogue with WCC, the World Bank and the IMF have been encouraged to re-examine their concepts of development and evolving institutional mandates. The last “encounter” took place in Accra, Ghana in August 2008.

 
 



Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/1F9FW2W0T0