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Managing Openness

Trade and Outward-Oriented Growth after the Crisis

Wednesday, June 22 at 12pm in Auditorium J1-050

The global financial crisis triggered a broad reassessment of economic integration policies in developed and developing countries worldwide. The crisis-induced collapse in trade was the sharpest ever since World War II, affecting all countries and all product categories. A huge shock to the trading system, combined with severe macroeconomic instability, makes it natural for policymakers to call into question the basic underlying assumptions of trade liberalization and openness. In particular, outward-oriented or export-led growth strategies are being reassessed as openness is increasingly associated with greater volatility. However, it is crucial not to lose sight of the dynamic benefits that openness can offer. Examples include technology transfer, increased competitive pressure that reduces markups and improves efficiency, and economies of scale. The real question is how to manage outward-oriented strategies so as to maximize the benefits of openness while minimizing risks.

Please enter through the InfoShop, on the southeast corner of 18th Street and Pennsylvania Ave, NW or through the lobby, 701 18th Street NW.

PRESENTER
Mona E. Haddad
Sector Manager, International Trade Department, World Bank

DISCUSSANTS
Kimberly Ann Elliott
Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development

Ranil Salgado
Chief, Trade Division, Strategy, Review, and Policy Department, International Monetary Fund

For panelist biographies, please see below.

To RSVP, click here or email infoshopevents@worldbank.org.

PRESENTER
Mona E. Haddad
Sector Manager, International Trade Department, World Bank
In this capacity Ms. Haddad manages the group responsible for supporting the development and implementation of trade-related activities at both country and regional levels.  These include trade policy analysis, competitiveness, trade facilitation and standards.  Prior to joining the Trade Department, Ms. Haddad was the Regional Trade Coordinator for the East Asia Region, where she worked on trade issues in various countries, including Indonesia, China, Laos, and Vietnam.

DISCUSSANTS
Kimberly Ann Elliott
Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development
Ms. Elliott is a Senior Fellow with the Center for Global Development (CGD) and the author or co-author of numerous books and articles on trade policy and globalization, with a focus on the political economy of trade and the uses of economic leverage in international negotiations. In 2009-10 she chaired the CGD working group that produced the report, Open Markets for the Poorest Countries:  Trade Preferences that Work, and before that, the book, Delivering on Doha:  Farm Trade and the Poor, was co-published in July 2006 by CGD and the Peterson Institute for International Economics.  Ms. Elliott was with the Peterson Institute for many years before joining the Center full-time and remains a visiting fellow. Her books published there include Can International Labor Standards Improve under Globalization?  (with Richard B. Freeman, 2003), Corruption and the Global Economy (1997), Reciprocity and Retaliation in US Trade Policy (with Thomas O. Bayard, 1994), Measuring the Costs of Protection in the United States (with Gary Hufbauer, 1994), and Economic Sanctions Reconsidered (with Gary Hufbauer and Jeffrey Schott, 3rd. ed., 2007).  In 2002-03, she served on the National Academies Committee on Monitoring International Labor Standards, and in 2009 was appointed to the USDA Consultative Group on the Elimination of Child Labor in US Agricultural Imports.

Ranil Salgado
Chief, Trade Division, Strategy, Review, and Policy Department, International Monetary Fund
Mr. Salgado is the Chief of the Trade Division in the Strategy, Review, and Policy Department of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). He has been in the IMF for almost 15 years, also serving in the Asia and Pacific Department (a range of countries, including Australia, India, and Singapore), the Research Department (multilateral surveillance and the World Economic Outlook), and the Western Hemisphere Department  (U.S., Canada, and Dominica). Prior to joining the IMF, he worked in a strategy management consulting firm and as teaching and research assistants at the University of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins University, and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. He attended Harvard University, with graduate and doctoral studies at Cambridge University and the University of Pennsylvania.




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