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Partnerships with Civil Society

The World Bank has established partnerships with hundreds of CSOs throughout the world at the global, regional, and country levels.  These range from formal institutional agreements within ongoing programs and local projects, to informal collaborative initiatives on research studies, and jointly events.  Thematic areas which have Bank – CSO partnerships include forest conservation, AIDS vaccine research, water service provision, rural poverty reduction, micro-credit finance, and Internet development.  

The World Bank has established partnerships with CSOs and other organizations such as governments, businesses, and other donor agencies, to promote poverty reduction efforts.  These partnerships are organized according to thematic areas.  For more information on Bank partnerships, please visit the Bank's partnership page.

Agriculture and Rural Development
Biodiversity
Capacity Building
Environment
Forests and Forestry
Human Development
Water Resources Management



Agriculture and Rural Development

  • Partnering to Reduce Pesticides in Africa - The Africa Stockpiles Programme (ASP) was launched to clean up and safely dispose of all obsolete pesticide stocks from Africa and establish preventative measures to avoid future accumulation. The concept of a continent-wide stockpiles project grew out of informal discussions between CSOs and several inter-governmental organizations. The ASP's objective is to clean up stockpiled pesticides and pesticide-contaminated waste in Africa in an environmentally sound manner; catalyze development of prevention measures; and provide capacity building and institutional strengthening on important chemicals-related issues.  Housed in the World Bank, the ASP brings together the skills, expertise, and resources of a diverse group of stakeholders. 
  • Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) - Established in the early 1970s, the CGIAR works to promote food security, poverty eradication, and the sound management of natural resources throughout the developing world. It is the largest scientific network of its kind.  At the national level, CGIAR centers work with National Agricultural Research Systems (NARS) and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to devise policies, conduct research, and ensure that research results move from laboratories to farmers' fields. Some 300 NGOs are engaged in collaborative research programs with CGIAR centers.
  • GEF/IUCN/WWF Partnership - The partnership focuses on demonstrating how integrated approaches to land and water resource (catchment) management can incorporate ecosystem considerations. The intention is to achieve this integration in a limited number of 'live' examples. Such basin management projects, which expand on existing activities of one or more of the interested organizations, would serve as models to accelerate change in the programs and projects of the four organizations concerned, as well as for much wider applications over time.  The four organizations will give priority attention to collaborative activities in the countries/regions where they are already active and/or have a presence on the ground.

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Biodiversity

  • Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund - In fiscal 2001, the Bank joined Conservation International and the Global Environment Facility to launch a $150 million Critical Ecosystems Partnership Fund (CEPF) to protect the world's threatened 'biodiversity hotspots'—highly threatened regions where some 60 percent of all terrestrial species diversity are found occupying only 1.4 percent of the planet's land surface. The Fund will help find solutions that allow poor people to have a better way of life while at the same time conserving the biodiversity on which their long-term survival depends.
  • Integrated Coastal Management Global Web Service - The global web service on Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) is a cooperative effort of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, UNESCO, the National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Center for the Study of Marine Policy, University of Delaware, and the World Bank. The website has is exclusively devoted to developments and advances in ICM at the international, regional, and national levels.
  • The International Coral Reef Initiative - The International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) is a partnership among nations and organizations seeking to implement Chapter 17 of Agenda 21, and other international Conventions and agreements for the benefit of coral reefs and related ecosystems. The Initiative was established in order to stop and reverse the global degradation of coral reefs and related ecosystems. ICRI was created in 1995, with the World Bank serving as one of its founding members. ICRI has grown to include over 80 countries concerned about conservation and sustainable use of coral reef resources.
  • The International Waters Learning Exchange and Resource Network - The Network's mission is to build an Internet-based "global knowledge community" to protect, restore and sustain the world's aquifers, great lakes and river basins, coastal zones, seas and oceans. Sponsored by the Global Environmental Facility (GEF) and its United Nations and World Bank partners, the International Waters Learning Exchange and Resource Network specifically builds capacity among transboundary water resource projects worldwide.

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Capacity Building

  • Civil Society Budget Initiative - The Civil Society Budget Initiative (CSBI) was a grants program coordinated by the International Budget Project.  Eligible countries for the 2004 year selection include Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Senegal, Cambodia, Indonesia, Mongolia, Bolivia, Honduras, and Nicaragua. CSBI is a partnership of civil society organizations (CSOs) that specialize in citizen based budget work, and donor agencies.

Environment

  • Clean Air Initiative - The Clean Air Initiative (CAI) advances innovative ways to improve air quality in cities by sharing knowledge and experiences through partnerships in selected regions of the world.  CAI partners and participants foster actions to improve air quality in cities. The initiative brings together a range of cross-cutting expertise in urban development, transport, energy reform, environmental management and environmental health.
  • Community Development Carbon Fund - At the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg, the World Bank launched a $100 million Community Development Carbon Fund (CDCF), in collaboration with the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA). The CDCF will provide carbon finance to small-scale projects in small developing countries and rural areas of all developing countries. The emphasis within the CDCF will be on renewable energy, energy efficiency, methane capture, and agro-forestry projects, with significant and measurable community development benefits.
  • Global Environment Facility (GEF) - The GEF forges international cooperation and finances actions to address six critical threats to the global environment: biodiversity loss, climate change, degradation of international waters, ozone depletion, land degradation, and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). GEF brings together 173 member governments and, working in partnership with the private sector, NGOs and international institutions to address complex environmental issues while supporting national sustainable development initiatives. Village organizations and other community-based groups, academic institutions, and foundations are among the CSO partners integral to GEF's efforts.

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Forests and Forestry

  • CEOs Forum on Forests - The CEOs Forum on Forest is a working partnership between the World Bank, the NGO community and the private sector. The Forum's purpose is to enhance dialogue with partners in an effort to improve forest resource management and halt forest ecosystem destruction. The Forum is divided into seven distinct working groups: Protected Areas, Markets, Russia, Tropical Africa, Indonesia, Sustainable Forest Management, and the Forest Dialogue. The Forum has convened annually since 1998.
  • The World Bank/WWF Alliance for Forest Conservation and Sustainable Use - The Alliance is a strategic, performance-based, global partnership, formed in response to a crisis - the continued depletion of the world's forest biodiversity, the loss of forest-based goods and services essential for sustainable development, and the resulting severe impacts on the livelihoods of the rural poor.  The Alliance is working with governments, the private sector, and civil society to create 50 million hectares (124 million acres) of new protected areas of forest. It is also helping ensure that a similar amount of existing protected areas come under effective management by 2005.  In the same timeframe, the Alliance aims to have 200 million hectares (495 million acres) of the world's production forests under independently certified management.
  • Forest Trends - The mission of Forest Trends is to maintain and restore forest ecosystems by promoting incentives that diversify trade in the forest sector, moving beyond exclusive focus on lumber and fiber to a broader range of products and services.  Forest Trends plays the roles of: convening diverse stakeholders around important forest issues and new green market opportunities, and disseminating information on new opportunities for improving forest conservation.
  • Amazon Network on Forests - Stemming from the ongoing work of the Pilot Program to Conserve the Brazilian Rain Forest, the World Bank helped create the Amazon Network on Forests as a regional response to a growing demand from a wide array of stakeholders to improve knowledge, coordination and cooperation on conservation and sustainable use of the Amazon rain forest.
  • The Collaborative Partnership on Forests - The Collaborative Partnerships on Forests supports the work of the UNFF and fosters increased cooperation and coordination on forests among key international forest-related organizations and agreements, including: the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Convention on Biological Diversity, the Convention to Combat Desertification, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.
  • The United Nations Forum on Forests - Established in 2001, the UNFF is a subsidiary body of the UN Economic Social Committee mandated to promote the management, conservation and sustainable development of all types of forests and to strengthen long-term political commitment to this end.

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Human Development

  • Global Campaign for Education (EFA) - The EFA partnership, which is a broad coalition of national governments, organizations such as UNESCO and the World Bank, civil society groups, and associations, is committed to reaching and sustaining the EFA goals through broad-based partnerships within countries, and supported by co-operation with regional and international institutions.  EFA is a commitment taken on by the international community at the April 2000 World Education Forum in Senegal to achieve education for “every citizen in every society.”  Specifically, EFA partnership is committed to ensure that the Millennium Development Goal on education is met.
  • The Pakiv European Roma Fund – The Bank has joined European NGOs and foundations in an effort to promote the social and economic development of Roma peoples in Central and Eastern Europe.  The Pakiv European Roma Fund was established in Bulgaria in March 2002 to provide grants and interest-free loans for income-generating activities, support leadership and organizational management training, and strengthen cross-country Roma networks. Pakiv-Europe also facilitates international networking and communication, by hosting training workshops and conferences. The Fund has begun working in four countries – Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia – but hopes to expand to others over the coming years.
  • Investment Partnership for Polio – The partnership is an innovative financing program to help eradicate polio (poliomyelitis) worldwide by 2005.  The World Bank, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Rotary International, and the United Nations Foundation, comprise the Investment Partnership for Polio.  The program aims to fund immunization of children in polio endemic countries.  The partnership will "buy down" a country's IDA loans upon successful completion of that country's polio eradication program. Because of the generous loan terms, each grant dollar unlocks US$2.50-3.00 for affected countries to fight polio.
  • Roll Back Malaria - The global Roll Back Malaria (RBM) effort was announced by the heads of WHO, UNICEF, UNDP, and the World Bank in November 1998. The RBM partnership consists of malaria-affected countries, UN agencies, the private sector, industry, OECD countries, development banks, CSOs, research entities, and the media. In 2010, the RBM Partnership is comprised of 500 partners that are organized in eight constituencies. There are six core elements to the strategy to achieve this goal: (i) early detection; (ii) rapid treatment; (iii) multiple means for prevention; (iv) well-coordinated action; (v) a dynamic global movement; and (vi) focused research.
  • Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) - The Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) is a public health initiative aiming at immunizing the world’s children against vaccine-preventable disease.  Partners include: country representatives, bilateral agencies, technical agencies, UNICEF, the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Bank, private industry, the Bill and Melinda Gates Children's Vaccine Program at PATH (Gates CVP), the Rockefeller Foundation, the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Associations (IFPMA) and other.  To meet GAVI's goals, the Global Fund for Children's Vaccines has been launched to raise the funds that are needed to get the job done.

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Water Resources Management

  • Global Water Partnership - The Global Water Partnership is a working partnership among all those involved in water management: government agencies, public institutions, private companies, professional organizations, multilateral development agencies, CSOs and others committed to the Dublin-Rio principles.  This initiative was based on promoting and implementing integrated water resources management through the development of a worldwide network that could pull together financial, technical, policy and human resources to address the critical issues of sustainable water management.

Last updated: 2013-02-26




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