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2007 Annual Meetings-Civil Society Policy Forum

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2007 Civil Society Policy Forum
Washington, DC, USA
October 18-22, 2007

The Civil Society Policy Forum was held from Thursday, October 18 to Monday, October 22, 2007 during the 2007 Annual Meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund.  It was organized by the WBG and IMF Civil Society Teams. The Forum policy dialogue sessions brought together Bank and Fund staff, CSO representatives, government officials, and others to discuss important issues to be addressed during the 2007 Annual Meetings.  They were either organized by the Bank, Fund, CSOs or jointly by all three parties and included the following topics: governance, extractive indusstries, IDA replenishment, access to services, loan conditionalities, climate change, agriculture, and PRSPs.  There was also a townhall meething with Bank President Robert Zoellick and Fund Managing Director Rodrigo de Rato and a meeting with Lars Tunnel of the IFC.

We will be posting summaries, lists of participants, and photos for many of the sessions in the coming weeks, thus please visit this page regularly

Thursday      Friday  Saturday

    Sunday

    Monday

The following sessions were streamed live on the web and can now be viewed if you click on the links below:

  • Saturday, 12:30 - 2:00 pm --- Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children in Education Through EFA FTI Processes and National Sector Plans. To view this session, please click here
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  • Monday, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm --- Public-Private Partnerships: Opportunities and Challenges. The GF-WB Partnership and the We Are the Future Model.  To view this session, please click here

Final

  Thursday, October 18

 

  11:00 am - 12:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Promoting and Scaling Up Demand Side Engagement to Improve Governance

Sponsors: InterAction, Transparency International, World Bank
Speakers: Valeria Merinodirani, Transparency International, Ecuador; Preeti Shroff-Mehta, World Learning; Parmesh Shah, South Asia Rural Development, World Bank, Moderator: Sylvain Browa, InterAction

This session brought together the experiences of very different institutions: civil society and The World Bank Group, in promoting more accountable and responsive public governance through civic engagement. It explored the opportunities and challenges in applying demand-side approaches to governance, from issues of access to information to problems of capacity. It also highlighted examples of WBG efforts in supporting these approaches, and the challenges of mainstreaming them. The WBG’s Governance and Anti-Corruption Strategy and Implementation Plan offer important opportunities for scaling up demand-side approaches to improving governance, and provided a useful frame of reference for this session. The session addressed several key questions: 1) What are the experiences, opportunities and barriers of CSOs in promoting governmental accountability? 2) What actions is the WBG taking to promote demand driven governance in its operations? 3) Looking forward, how can the WBG and CSOs work in complementary ways in the implementation of the GAC strategy?.

List of Participants
Summary of discussion

 

  1:00 - 3:00 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Universal Access to Basic Services in Developing Countries: The Case for Public Health and Education

Sponsor: Oxfam International
Moderator/Chair: Peter Bakvis, Director, Global Unions; Panelists: Max Lawson, senior policy advisor Oxfam GB; Akansha Marphatia, ActionAid, speaking on behalf of the Global Campaign for Education; Andrew Kumbatira, Malawi Economic Justice Network; Ruth Kagia, Director, Education Team, World Bank; Julian Schweitzer, Director, Health, Nutrition & Population Team, Human Development Network, World Bank.

One of the issues the World Bank/ IMF Annual Meetings addressed was how the Bank has helped the poorest countries meet the Millennium Development Goals. However, without free, universal, public healthcare and education and long-term, predictable financing to provide these, achieving the MDGs will not be within reach. Oxfam's recent report "In the Public Interest: Health, Education, and Water and Sanitation For All"challenges donors and developing country governments to spend more on building effective and sustainable public health and education in developing countries. The report argues that only governments can reach the scale necessary to provide universal access to services that are free or heavily subsidized for the poor and geared to the needs of all citizens – including women and girls, minorities, and the very poorest. This event encouraged a lively dialogue about the role of the World Bank and other donors in supporting public systems in developing countries, and in providing more predictable aid through budget or sector support.

List of Participants .

 

 3:30 - 5:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issues and Challenges in Assessing the Impact of Policy Reforms on Affected Groups

Sponsor: World Bank
PresenterElizabeth Stuart, Oxfam International; Discussants: Steen Jorgensen, Director, Social Development Department, Luca Barbone, Director, Poverty Reduction Group, World Bank; Robert Gillingham, IMF.
Moderator: Jeff Thindwa, Civil Society Team, World Bank

This session provided a platform for participants to discuss how the WBG and IMF assess the impacts of the reforms they promote. Through the Poverty and Impact Analysis (PSIA) instrument the WBG and IMF conducts assessments of the likely distributional impact of policy reforms on the well-being of different stakeholder groups, especially the poor. The goal is to promote evidence-based policy choices and foster stakeholder debate on policy reform options. In a recent Joint NGO Briefing Note, however, a group of NGOs argued that while there has been some progress on PSIA, the WBG and IMF still do not consistently assess the likely consequences of their different policy actions on the poor. In this session, a representative of these NGOs presented the main arguments and conclusions of the Joint NGO Briefing Note. Representatives of the WBG and IMF shared their views, and participants deliberated on the issues that emerged.

Session Summary
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 3:30 - 5:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moving Beyond the Privatization Debate-New Approaches to Financing Water and Electricity

Sponsor: Friedrich Ebert Foundation
Speakers: Ms. Katharina Gassner, Senior Economist, Finance, Economics and Urban Department (FEU), World Bank; Mr. Jomo K.S., Assistant-Secretary-General for Economic Development, United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs; Mr. David Hall, Director, Public Services International Research Unit (PSIRU); Mr. Daniel Platz, Economic Affairs Officer, Financing for Development Office; Mr. Frank Schroeder, Senior Economist, Friedrich Ebert Foundation

Any realistic policy approach to expand and improve access to utility services requires additional and predictable financing for infrastructure investment. The event focused on  a new framework for the discussion of utility finance. Rather than weighing the benefits of private against public provisions of services it approached the discussion from the viewpoint of a publicly owned utility and debated policy options on how to achieve increased access to water and electricity for the poor.
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 6:00 - 8:30 pm
 IMF HQ1
 Meeting Hall A&B 

 

 

Townhall Meeting and Reception with Civil Society Representatives

Robert B. Zoellick, President of the World Bank Group; Rodrigo de Rato, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) responded to questions from representatives of civil society organizations accredited to the Annual Meetings.  The session was moderated by Emmanuel O. Akwetey, Executive Director, Institute for Democratic Governance, Ghana. The discussion was followed by a reception.  Webcast   Transcript
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Friday, October 19

 

 9:00 - 10:30 am
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Climate and Carbon to Forests and Finance: Risks and Prospects of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility

Sponsors: Bank Information Center, Greenpeace, Sustainable Energy and Economy Network (SEEN)
CSO discussants: Daphne Wysham, Sustainable Energy and Economy Network; Luke Fletcher, Jubilee Australia; Susanne Breitkopf, Greenpeace.  World Bank discussants: Benoit Bosquet, Sustainable Development Network; Gerhard Dieterle, Forests Adviser, Agriculture and Rural Development, WB

The session provided an opportunity to discuss the Bank's promotion of carbon finance as a way to encourage reduced emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, and to draw lessons from the Bank's past work in forest sector reform and the carbon market to inform future efforts. The discussion focused on the risks and prospects of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), its potential impacts on future international climate negotiations, and alternative approaches to reducing deforestation.

List of Participants

 

 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safety Nets Successes and Challenges: The View from  Ethiopia

Sponsors:  Save the Children
Speakers: Sandor Sipos, World Bank; David Throp, Save the Children Chair: Congresswoman Betty McCollum, Member of the United States Congress and Chair of the Parliamentary Network on the World Bank.

The debate around social protection programmes and cash safety nets globally is intensifying, with a new African Ministerial Summit likely next year and a proliferation of projects in Latin America and increasingly in Africa.  Ethiopia, with the support of the World Bank and DFID, and the participation of Save the Children UK, has been at the front edge of this movement in Africa. What has been achieved, and what are the challenges that need to be addressed as these types of programmes are piloted and run elsewhere?.

List of Participants.

 

  11:30 am - 12:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-200

 

 

 

Open House to Discuss New MIGA Policies

Sponsor: MIGA
Opening remarks: Yukiko Omura, Executive Vice President, MIGA; Speakers: Frank Lysy, Director, Economics and Policy, and Moina Varkie, Director, External Outreach and Partnerships.

MIGA sponsored a session for CSOs, and stakeholders to discuss the agency's new Disclosure and Social and Environmental Sustainability Policies.    .
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 9:00 - 10:30 am
 at the IFC bldg.

Program of Seminars Session: "Trends and Challenges in Globalization - The Global Expansion: Prospects and Risks."
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 10:45 am - 12:15 pm
 at the IFC bldg.

Program of Seminars Session: "The New Aid Architecture: Old Wine in New Bottles or a Paradigm Shift?"
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  12:00 - 2:30 pm
 World Bank
 Main Bldg.
 room MC4-800

 

 

Forum on Agriculture’s Key Role in the Economic Transformation of Africa

The event stressed agriculture’s potential power for reducing rural poverty in Africa and showed that the Bank is committed to a multisectoral approach to the sector. The discussion provided a chance to hear views on agricultural development in Africa from the perspective of business, civil society, government representatives, and international agencies.  It also gave a chance for the Bank to explain how the recommendations of theWorld Development Report 2008: Agriculture for Developmentcan be put into practice to benefit African farmers.
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  1:30 - 3:00 pm
 venue: MCC1-200

 

 

 

 

 

Discussion with the Office of the Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman (CAO): Participatory Monitoring as a Means to Resolve Conflict

Sponsor: CAO Office
Speaker: Meg Taylor, the CAO; David Atkins, Hydrologist, Water Study Team; and Susan Wildau, Mediator, CDR Associates

Minera Yanacocha is the largest gold mine in South America.  IFC has been involved in this controversial project since 1993.  A mercury spill in 2000 signaled the start of CAO’s involvement in the Yanacocha project and in early 2001, a complaint was filed by affected communities.  At this session, the CAO described how a participatory water monitoring project, established as part of the Mesa de Diàlogo y Consenso CAO-Cajamarca, helped to build capacity, knowledge, and trust among local citizens who were -- and continue to be -- impacted by the mine's operations. In addition to highlighting the specific case of Yanacocha, the session offered ideas and insights about how collaborative monitoring programs can help companies and impact communities working together to address and resolve conflicts.
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 1:00 - 3:00 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Role of LICs in the Governance of the IMF / World Bank

Sponsor: Center of Concern, CIDSE, Eurodad
Speakers: Aldo Caliari, Center of Concern; Prof. Danny Bradlow, American University

Low income countries, especially after a stream of early repayments by Fund members, represent the largest portion of borrowers from the Fund, and are those where the Fund has still the largest clout. Low income countries are also the exclusive users of the IDA window at the World Bank.  This Panel explored the following questions: How relevant is the reform of quota formula to the vote of the poorest members? How relevant are basic votes to the same purpose? What would be needed in order to bring basic votes to the original proportion? On which grounds would the participation of recipient countries in IDA discussions be justified? What forms could this participation have? What is the evaluation of past experiments with limited participation of recipient countries in some selected IDA discussions?

 1:30 - 3:00 pm
 at the IFC bldg.

Program of Seminars Sessions:  (1) "Trends and Challenges in Globalization: Growing Role of Private Equity and Hedge Funds";   and     (2) "The New Aid Architecture: Foundations and the Global Scene: Are We Entering a New “Golden Age” of Philanthropy?"
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 3:15-4:45 pm
 at the IFC bldg.

Program of Seminars Sessions:  (1) "Trends and Challenges in Globalization: How to Build Support for Globalization";    and    (2) "The New Aid Architecture in Health: the Way Forward."
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 5-6:30 pm
 at the IFC bldg.

Program of Seminars Session: " Low Carbon, High Hopes: Making Climate Action Work for Development."
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Saturday, October 20

 

 9:00 - 10:30 am
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sustainability and the World Development Report 2008:  A Look at the World Bank's Rural Development and Agricultural Strategies

Sponsors: ActionAid International, Heinrich Boell Foundation
Speakers: Dr. Goodal Gondwe, Minister of Finance, Malawi;  Sophia Murphy, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, USA; Eric Gutierrez, ActionAid International; David Byerlee, World Bank WDR 2008; Collins Magalasi, ActionAid Malawi; ModeratorLiane Schalatek, Heinrich Boell Foundation.

The World Development Report (WDR) is the flagship publication of the World Bank and an opportunity for the Bank to present its most coherent development strategy in a given area.  For the first time since 1982, the WDR 2008 deals exclusively with agricultural and rural development policies.  This panel discussion provided a critical look at the WDR 2008, proposed alternative agricultural policies and through presentations of examples of policy alternatives being pursued in  Malawi and Vietnam asked: Are the development strategies of the World Bank for the rural sector in sync with the new demands of the agricultural sector? Are the ecological and social dimensions of agriculture taken sufficiently taken into account? Thus, does the WDR 2008 indicate a fresh direction for the World Bank agriculture/rural sector policies or does it merely restate a pre-disposition towards market-oriented approaches?

List of Participants
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 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-100



 

Sub-Saharan Africa Regional Economic Outlook 

Sponsor: IMF
Speakers: Andrew Berg and Calvin McDonald, African Department

This session included a presentation of the main conclusions from the IMF's Sub-Saharan Regional Economic Outlook (REO) and the risks to the outlook, and discussed the case studies included in the REO on the Creation of Fiscal Space for Priority spending.
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 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-200
 

 

 

 

 

Introduction to the Office of the Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman (CAO)

Sponsor:  CAO Office
Speaker: Meg Taylor, the CAO

The CAO discussed the office's three key roles: (1) Addressing complaints by project-affected people; (2) Overseeing audits of IFC/MIGA projects; and (3) Providing independent advice to the World Bank Group President and management of IFC/MIGA. In addition, CAO staff provided an overview of current and recently closed complaints, the revised CAO Operational Guidelines, and a recently launched outreach initiative to project-affected people. During this interactive session, CAO staff solicited input and ideas from Civil Society Organizations about priorities for outreach and strategies for addressing common challenges faced by IRMs.
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 12:30 - 2:00 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children in Education Through EFA FTI Processes and National Sector Plans

Sponsor: World Vision
Speakers: Philippa Lei, Senior Child Rights Policy Adviser, World Vision UK and editor of the new report "Education’s Missing Millions: Including Disabled Children in Education Through EFA FTI Processes and National Sector Plans"; Joy Phumaphi, Vice President, Human Development Network, World Bank.

One third of the 77 million children still out of school are disabled children and fewer than 10% of disabled children in Africa attend school. Globally, ensuring the inclusion of disabled children is critical to achieving the goal of universal primary education by 2015. Moreover, access to quality basic education is a fundamental human right. This seminar examined the issues facing disabled children in the South in regards to education and provided recommendations and examples of promising practice for how the Education For All Fast Track Initiative and its national government and donor partners, including the World Bank, can better address these.

Session summary
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 1:00 - 3:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-200

 

 

 

 

 

Wage Bill Ceilings, Fiscal and Monetary Policies, and Absorbing Aid Inflows - Updates and Next Steps

Sponsor: Action Aid International
Speakers: Mr. John Hicklin, Deputy Director, IMF's Independent Evaluation Office (IEO); Mr. David Goldsbrough, Center for Global Development; Ms. Akanksha A. Marphatia, ActionAid International; Mr. Jan Kees Martijn, IMF; Moderator: Mr. Peter Chowla, Bretton Woods Project

This session focused on an April 2007 report by the IEO on "The Role of the IMF in Sub-Saharan Africa," and related studies carried out by CSOs and IMF staff.   The discussion centered on whether the fiscal and monetary policy targets in IMF-supported loan programs are unnecessarily restrictive and impairing the ability of borrowing countries to absorb and spend new inflows of foreign aid.  Further, the topic of wage bill ceilings, and under what conditions should they be used was discussed.

List of Participants
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 1:30 - 3:00 pm
 venue: World Bank
 "I" Building
 1850 I Street, NW
 Room I1-200

 

 

The Agenda of the Development Committee and the Provision of Global Public Goods

Sponsor: Friedrich Ebert Foundation (FES)
Speakers: Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul, Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development, Germany; Nancy Birdsall, President, Center for Global Development;
Moderator: Jürgen Stetten, Director, FES New York.

As in previous years, the Friedrich Ebert Foundation (FES) facilitated a discussion during the IFI Annual Meetings for NGO representatives with the German Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development, Ms. Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul, discussed current issues on the agenda of the Development Committee of the World Bank.
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 4:00 - 5:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The second Generation PRSPs - What has Changed?

Sponsors: Afrodad, Jubilee USA, Action Aid International
Speakers: Vitalis Meja, Afrodad; Peter Lanzet, EED; Louise Cord, World Bank; Moderator: Rick Rowden, Action Aid International

AFRODAD commissioned five country case studies to examine extent to which the second generation PRSPs are different from the first generation in terms of process and content. The studies focused on interrogating the similarities and differences and their efficacy in addressing long term problems of poverty reduction in selected African countries including, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mozambique, Tanzania, and Uganda.
 
This panel discussed weaknesses in the first generation PRSPs and ways in which they have been addressed in the second generation PRSPs.

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List of Participants

 

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Sunday, October 21

 

  9:00 - 10:30 am
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

The IMF’s Policy Support Instrument (PSI): More Flexibility or Continued Belt-Tightening? Case Studies from Uganda, Mozambique and Bangladesh

Sponsor: ActionAid
Speakers: Specioza Kiwanuka, a Ugandan economist, Director of Programs at ActionAid-Uganda; Jesse Griffiths, Policy Analyst at ActionAid-UK and principal author of “What Progress? A Shadow Review of World Bank Conditionality”; Soren Ambrose, with Solidarity Africa Network, previously Co-Director of 50 Years is Enough.

This session presented a briefing paper on the PSIs under implementation in Uganda and Mozambique, as well as Bangladesh’s recent decision against a PSI and raised a key question, when will "belt-tightening" end? When will a range of fiscal policy and public spending options beyond what the IMF recommends begin to be explored? When will public expenditures and investments on essential services be prioritized?

 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stolen Asset Recovery (StAR) Initiative: Challenges, Opportunities, and Action Plan

Sponsor: New Rules for Global Finance Coalition
Discussants: Randi Ryterman and Rick Messick, World Bank; David Spencer, Tax Justice Network International; Tom Cardamone, Global Financial Integrity.  Moderator: Jo Marie Griesgraber, New Rules for Global Finance Coalition.

On September 17, 2007 the World Bank and the United Nations announced a joint initiative to help developing nations recover billions of dollars in stolen assets.  The initiative estimates between US$1 trillion and US$1.6 trillion is lost each year to various illegal activities including corruption, criminal activity such as drugs, counterfeit goods, money, and illegal arms trade, and tax evasion. Corrupt leaders of poor countries skim as much as US$40 billion each year and stash their looted funds overseas. Once gone, they are extremely difficult to recover, as countries like Nigeria and the Philippines have discovered.

List of Participants
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 1:00 - 2:00 pm
 venue: Murrow Park



The Global Call to Action against Poverty (GCAP)   hosted an exciting and unique performance of the Poverty Requiem in Murrow Park, right in front of the entrance of the main building of the World Bank. The Poverty Requiem is a vocal musical piece for choir and percussion which use music to tell the story of injustice and poverty – and the need to change it. The performance featured a multi-ethnic choir and percussion ensemble from Lehigh Valley Charter High School for the Performing Arts and the Kutztown Percussion Ensemble.  photos and  video
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  1:00 - 2:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting What You Want from the Fund: The Global Transparency Initiative and the IMF

Sponsors:  Global Transparency Initiative (GTI)
Speakers: Peter Chowla, Bretton Woods Project; Bruce Jenkins,
Bank Information Center; Chair: Bhumika Muchhala, Bank Information Center

The Global Transparency Initiative (GTI) aims to strengthen IFIs' accountability to the public interest and to expand political space to debate development models. The GTI's Transparency Charter sets out standards and principles that should govern IFI disclosure policy.  The IMF holds a vast array of information on the economies and policies of its members, but this information is not always public.  The GTI has developed a Guide to Transparency at the IMF which it launched during this session.  The Guide is designed to help civil society find the information it needs to do policy and advocacy work at the Fund and at the national level.  The guide also highlights the problems with the IMF's information policies and makes recommendations for improving the IMF's disclosure practice and the upcoming IMF transparency policy review.
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 3:00 - 4:30 pm
 room HQ2  1-250
 IMF 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Macroeconomic Aspects of Aid Scaling Up and the Role of the Fund

Sponsors:  IMF's Fiscal Affairs and Policy Development and Review Departments
Chair: Mr. Mark Plant, Deputy Director, Policy Development and Review Department, IMF; Speakers: Hon. James Musoni, Minister of Finance and Economic Planning, Rwanda; Mr. Louis Kasekende, Chief Economist, African Development Bank; Mr. John Ambler, Senior Vice President for Programs, Oxfam America

The prospect of scaled-up aid presents low-income countries with opportunities for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Managing these aid flows, however, also poses significant challenges for macroeconomic management. These challenges arise from the potential impact of higher external inflows on competitiveness, inflation, and debt sustainability, and the complications posed by aid volatility and uncertainty for longer-term fiscal planning. This session focused on the fiscal, monetary, and exchange rate policy challenges of managing aid, including issues of competitiveness, inflation, government spending, and debt sustainability, and the complications posed by aid volatility.
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  3:30 - 5:00 pm
 venue: MCC1-200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Briefing on the IDA15 Replenishment Process

Sponsors: World Bank Concessional Finance and Global Partnerships Vice Presidency (CFPVP)
Speakers: Aki Nishio, Director, Resource Mobilization Department (FRM); Jorge Araujo, Lead Economist, FRM; Ivar Andersen, Lead Operations Officer, FRM.

This session focused on the 15th replenishment of the International Development Association (IDA).  IDA15 covered the period between 2009-2011, critical years for poor countries to make progress toward the MDGs ahead of the 2015 target.  The replenishment discussions have been addressing the increased fragmentation of the aid architecture and the role of IDA in this new and changing environment. Other development policy topics being discussed in IDA15 are the effectiveness of IDA’s assistance at the country level and IDA’s support for fragile states.  The panel provided an update on the ongoing negotiations with donors and borrowing country representatives, and made short presentations on the key policy issues that have been discussed during the IDA15 replenishment process. Questions and answers followed.
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List of Participants

 

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Monday, October 22

 

 9:00 - 10:30 am
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

IFIs in Post-Conflict Countries: Role, Activities, Impacts

Sponsor: Bank Information Center
Speakers: Louis Dicks-Mireaux, Deputy Division Chief, Policy Development and Review Department, IMF; Sarah Cliffe, East Asia Region, WB; Markus Kostner, Advisor, Fragile/Conflict Affected Countries, WB

This was an interactive discussion between World Bank, IFC, and IMF staff and civil society organizations. The objective of the session was to examine IFI engagement in post-conflict countries and fragile states, with a particular focus on funding priorities, policy formulation, project implementation and local participation. The discussion aimed to increase the knowledge of IFI-funded activities in post-conflict countries for civil CSOs, and to promote greater transparency of these activities overall.
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 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public-Private Partnerships: Opportunities and Challenges. The GF-WB Partnership and the We Are the Future Model

Sponsor: The Glocal Forum
Speakers: Mattias K. A. Lundberg, Children and Youth Unit, The World Bank; Salvatore Nigro, Glocal Forum; J. Matthew Clark, Microsoft;
Trevor Neilson, APCO Worldwide; Mr. Robert Patterson, FAO;  Moderator: Nell Derick Debevoise, Glocal Forum.

This session examined the Public-Private Partnership (PPP) model through the discussion of the We are the Future (WAF) experiences in six cities (i.e. Freetown, Kigali, Nablus) in which development and peace-building efforts are strengthened through a multi-faceted approach involving health, micro-agriculture/nutrition, sports, arts, and ICT activities for youth and children.   The panel focused on lessons learned from these experiences and discussed how cities, CSOs and youth organizations can use the PPP model to leverage inter-sectoral collaboration and attract international donor support to promote effective local development.

Summary of discussion (including a video file).

List of Participants
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 12:30 - 2:00 pm
 venue: MCC1-200

 

 

 

 

“Tapping the Gusher!  Can EITI Implementation Leverage Funds for MDGs? “

Sponsor: Nigeria Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (NEITI)
Moderator: Uche Igwe, NEITI; With contributions from: Hon David Goldwyn, Goldwyn International Strategies; Prof. Sylvester Monye,  Executive Secretary Nigerian National Planning Commission; Christian Layke, World Resources Institute; Yanus Carrim, MP South Africa; Patrick Heller, Stanford University; Allain Destexhe, MP Belgium.

The session drew from a variety of individuals whose experiences from the classroom to the field contributed to the debate on the opportunities for reversing the oil curse in resource rich developing countries.

List of Participants.

 

 1:00 - 3:00 pm
 venue: MCC1-100

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Race, Inclusion and Inequality in Latin America: Can CSOs, Governments, and Donor Agencies Work Together to Address it?”

Sponsor: Inter-American Foundation
Speakers: Giovanni Harvey, Incubadora Afro Brasileira - IA and Instituto Palmares de Direitos Humanos - IPDH, Brazil; Andrés Fernando Palacio Chaverra, Ministry of Social Protection, Colombia; Beatriz Ramírez, Secretary of Afro-Descendant Women Directorate, National Institute of Women (INAMU), Ministry of Social Development (MIDES), Uruguay; Luis Gilberto Murillo, Former Governor of Chocó, Colombia, Fellow Associate Phelps Stokes Fund- Washington, D.C.; Moderator: Judith Morrison, Inter-American Foundation.

The panel allowed an opportunity for representatives of the African descendent community, government and the private sector to take stock of progress toward and the challenges to inclusion of African descendants in the social and economic life of Latin America.

List of Participants
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 2:00 - 3:00 pm
 International Finance
 Corporation 
 (2121 Pennsylvania 
 Ave., NW)
 Room L-103

 

 

A Dialogue with Lars Thunell, International Finance Corporation (IFC) Executive Vice President and CEO

Sponsor
: IFC
Moderator: Bruce Moats, Head, Corporate Relations, IFC

This was an open dialogue with the IFC EVP which discussed the organization's work.  IFC fosters sustainable economic growth in developing countries by financing private sector investment, mobilizing private capital in local and international markets and providing advisory and risk mitigation services. 
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 3:30 - 5:00 pm
 International Finance
 (2121 Pennsylvania 
 Ave., NW)

 Room L-103


 

 

 

 

 

"Raw deals for raw materials? A civil society dialogue with the Bank and Fund on contract transparency and governance in the extractive industries"

Sponsors:Third World Network (Africa), Bank Information Center, Publish What You Pay Campaign, Oxfam-America
CSO discussants: Abdulai Darimani, TWN-Africa; Sarah Pray, Publish What You Pay-US; Heike Mainhard-Gibbs, BIC.  World Bank and IMF discussants: Anton Op de Beke, IMF; Charles McPherson, IMF; Clive Armstrong, IFC; Michael Levitsky, IFC; Motoko Aizawa, IFC; David Harris, IFC.

The discussion provided an opportunity to discuss the state of the debate regarding contract transparency and the human rights, environmental, and social impacts of investment agreements in the extractive industries. Participants were invited to share their views on the role of the Bretton Woods Institutions in the promotion of natural resource exploitation and governance reforms in the EI sectors, and particularly vis-à-vis issues of contract justice.
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 4:00 - 6:00 pm
 World Bank "J" bldg.
 (701 18th Street)
 room J5-099

 

 

 

 

The Interaction of African Civil Society with Regional Entities in Africa

Sponsors: World Bank Africa Region

The focus of this discussion session was the inclusion of African civil society voices in regional policy debate in the context of African regional bodies, and the role that the World Bank Group can play to help foster that process. It brought together African civil society participants at the 2007 Annual Meetings with officials from regional entities such as COMESA and ECOWAS, as well as government officials, to explore these issues, and identify potential strategies.

Summary of discussion
List of Participants.

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More Information:
2007 Annual Meetings - Zoellick Townhall and Video Conference
General Information about 2007 Annual Meetings
Annual and Spring Meetings

 




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