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2011 Annual Meetings - Civil Society Policy Forum

Available in: Français, Español, العربية

Civil Society Policy Forum
Washington, DC
September 19 - 24, 2011

The Civil Society Policy Forum was held from Wednesday, September 21 to Saturday, September 24, prior to, and during the 2011 Annual Meetings of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank Group. It was organized by the WBG and IMF Civil Society Teams. The Forum brought together Bank and Fund staff, CSO representatives, government officials, academics, and others to exchange views on a variety of topics ranging from the global economic crisis and climate change, to governance reform. It also included a Townhall Meeting with Bank President Robert B. Zoellick and Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde.

Several sessions were organized prior to the CS Forum which included a capacity-building session on the IMF and an orientation session on the World Bank, as well as a workshop for sponsored youth leaders. 

Please find the online schedule below including participant lists, presentations, and summary notes for many of the policy sessions.  If you have any questions about the forum please contact the World Bank Civil Society team civilsociety@worldbank.org / 1 - 202 473-1840.

 

2011 AMs Photo Gallery

MondayTuesday   Wednesday  Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Pre-Civil Society Forum Events
 

Monday, September 19

9:00 am – 5:00 pm
IMF HQ1 1-704 (Events Hall)

Capacity-Building Session on the IMF  /  Orientation Session on the World Bank

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank Group (WBG)

Panelists: IMF:  Vasuki Shastry (External Relations Department), Karla Chaman (Civil Society Team); WB: Sumir Lal (Operations Communications Department, WB), John Garrison (Civil Society Team, WB), Aaron Rosenberg (Public Affairs Unit, IFC), Rebecca Post (Communications Team, MIGA)

This session will focus on the IMF and WBG (IBRD, IFC, MIGA) origins, organizational structure, major policies, and operational work. Space may be limited thus please RSVP to this session by sending email to: AORRACATETTEH@imf.org by September 16.

Presentations:

 

Tuesday, September 20

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Individual Meetings between CSOs and Bank and Fund Staff and Executive Directors

 

5:00 – 6:30
IMF HQ1 1-704 (Events Hall)

Executive Directors Roundtable with CSOs

Sponsors:  International Monetary Fund, World Bank Group

Co-Chairs:  Ian Solomon (WB Executive Director, US),  Moeketsi Majoro (IMF ED, Lesotho)

This will be a roundtable discussion between IMF and WBG Executive Directors with civil society representatives accredited to the Annual Meetings.  The purpose of this event is to promote an exchange of views and discussion on  2011 Annual Meetings policy issues such as jobs, gender, economic recovery, and climate change.

Summary 

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CIVIL SOCIETY POLICY FORUM EVENTS 
September 21 - 24

 Wednesday, September 21

8:00 am  – 9:00
MC C1-100

Welcome Breakfast

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund / World Bank Group

Panelists: Karla Chaman, Tilla McAntony (IMF), John Garrison, Nneka Okereke (WB)

Come meet the Fund and Bank Civil Society Team staff, learn about Annual Meetings activities such as the Civil Society Forum and  Program of Seminars, and discuss meeting logistics.

 

9:00 – 10:30
MC 5 -100

Introduction to WBG  Procurement and Consulting Services

Sponsors:  World Bank, Private Sector Liaison Officers (PSLOs)

Panelists: Nancy Bikondo (Procurement Specialist, WB), Peter Easley (Senior Contracts Officer, WB)

The World Bank’s International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA) lend billions of dollars to client countries for projects aimed at fighting poverty. These funds are used by countries to purchase goods, works, non-consulting, and consulting services needed to implement the projects.

The session will provide important information to participants on how to find business opportunities in World Bank financed projects. It will focus on the following important aspects: How to identify business opportunities; The role of the Bank, borrowing countries, and the bidder/consultant in Bank financed procurement; and the Procurement and Consultant Guidelines of the Bank. Representatives from two PSLOs will share their experiences which will be aimed at providing participants with practical strategies for winning bids or consulting assignments.

 

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-100

Contract Watch: Citizen Engagement in Procurement and Contract Monitoring

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists:  Florence Dennis (Ghana Anti-Corruption Coalition), Thomas Nah (Liberia Center for Transparency and Accountability), and Teresa Omondi (Kenya Transparency International).  Chairs: Sahr Kpundeh (Africa Region, WB) and Robert Hunja (World Bank Institute).

The award and implementation of large contracts and concessions is critical to development.  Poor choices about how contracts are awarded and implemented, how resources are developed and how revenues are spent, result in poor development outcomes for society.  But when contracts are monitored, citizens can hold their governments and service providers accountable for how money is spent, and can raise questions when results are not delivered.  And when coalitions work together to monitor contracts, they can achieve sustainable results. 

The Contract Watch approach brings together public, private, and civil society stakeholders to build multi-stakeholder coalitions to monitor contracts for sustainable results. The World Bank Africa Region and the World Bank Institute have engaged with 12 countries on the regional program as part of the governance and accountability agenda: Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Kenya, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Liberia, Zambia, Uganda, and Senegal.  A sub-regional approach is now being utilized to further this work.  This panel will highlight experience from Liberia, Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, and regional perspectives from West Africa and East & Southern Africa, looking at contract monitoring in a variety of key sectors.

Participant List

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-200

Hydropower Standards in a Changing Economic Landscape

Sponsor:  International Rivers

Panelists:  Li Bo (Director, Friends of Nature China), Julia Bucknall(Manager, Water Anchor, WB), Zachary Hurwitz (Policy Coordinator, International Rivers US), Reidar Kvam (Manager, Policy and Quality Assurance, IFC), Gustavo Pimentel (Amigos da Terra-Amazônia Brasileira, Brasil)

We currently see a resurgence of large hydropower projects to promote electricity generation and economic growth. At the same time, freshwater ecosystems suffer most heavily from species extinction, and large centralized projects will make it more difficult for countries to adapt their water sectors to the vagaries of climate change. Freshwater ecosystems and floodplains are areas of high biodiversity, and may be the home of vulnerable social groups such as indigenous peoples. How do the IFC PS and World Bank safeguards revisions, the creation of new guidelines at regional banks, and the creation of new assessment tools influence the rigor and quality of hydropower standards? Which initiatives will strengthen social and environmental outcomes, and which will present greater risks for poor results?

This panel will map the current trends in hydropower policy initiatives, examine the results of specific case studies, and discuss civil society proposals of how to move forward.

Participant List

Presentations:

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-110

Real Aid: Towards an End to Aid Dependency?

Sponsor:  ActionAid

Panelists:  Lucia Fry (Policy Adviser, ActionAid UK), Barbara Lee (Head, Aid Effectiveness Team, World Bank), Matthew Martin (Director, Development Finance International), Richard Ssewakiryanga (Executive Director, Uganda NGO Forum), CHAIR: Neil Watkins (Director of Policy and Campaigns, ActionAid USA)

With much of the rich world in recession and aid budgets under threat, it’s more critical now than ever to ensure that scarce foreign assistance dollars are dedicated to help impoverished countries to move away from aid dependency. A new report from ActionAid, Real Aid 3, reveals good news: Developing countries are getting less dependent on aid. In the past decade in Ghana aid dependency fell from 47% to 27%, in Mozambique from 74% to 58% and in Vietnam from 22% to 13%.

The kind of aid that helps support dramatic decreases in aid dependence like this is what ActionAid calls real aid – that’s aid which empowers poor women and men to realize their rights, and reduces inequality. This event will launch ActionAid’s new Real Aid 3 report and engender a discussion about aid effectiveness and how more effective aid can best help end aid dependency.

Participant List

Presentations:

10:00 – 12:00
Preston Auditorium

Open Forum on Gender

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists:  Robert Zoellick (President, WB), Maria Eitel (President and Founder of the Nike Foundation), Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala (Nigeria Finance Minister),  Gayle Lemmon ( Deputy Director of the Council on Foreign Relations’ Women and Foreign Policy Program), Bunker Roy (Founder of Barefoot College), Nadia Al-Sakkaf (Editor in Chief of The Yemen Times), Fernanda Borges (Leader of the East Timor National Unity Party), and Kakenya Ntaiya (Founder of the Academy for Girls, Kenya), CHAIR: Hala Gorani (CNN International Anchor).

It’s 2011, and inequality is still a lifelong experience for girls and women. Women make up the majority of unpaid workers worldwide. More girls are out of school than boys. Violence against women is still widespread.  It’s time to increase women’s economic opportunity and their voice in decision making. But how do we get to equal?  The live debate will focus on the ideas received from global participants about ways to overcome the multiple forms of inequality that women and girls face every day. 

For more information about the Open Forum, please visit:
live.worldbank.org/open-forum-gender 

 

11:00 – 1:00 pm
MC C1 - 200

Phase II Consultations: Program-for-Results Financing Instrument

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists:  Joachim von Amsberg (Vice President, OPCS/WB), Paul Bermingham  (Director, OPCS), Fadia Saadah  (Manager, OPCIL)

The World Bank is proposing a new lending instrument that will help its client countries better deliver their development programs. Program-for-Results financing would link disbursement of Bank financing to the achievement of verified results. It would also work to strengthen program institutions and systems, and would allow the Bank to have more effective partnerships with governments and other donors in support of larger development programs.

A concept note formed the basis of the recently concluded Phase I consultations on the proposed instrument.  These consultations were held in 39 countries (33 client countries and 6 donor countries) in Africa, South Asia, Middle East and North Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, East Asia and Pacific, and Europe and Central Asia, with a broad range of governments, development partners, civil society organizations, private sector, academics and other stakeholders.

As part of Phase II consultations on the Program-for-Results financing instrument, the World Bank is seeking feedback on the policy paper that takes into account the input received from the extensive global consultation process on the Concept Note. The policy paper was made publicly available for comment in August and the  consultation period ends September 30, 2011.  This session will be an opportunity to share your views/feedback and comments and hear from the Bank on the key features and focus of the proposed lending instrument.

Participant List
Feedback Summary

Presentations: 

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-110

Social Safety Nets: An Evaluation of World Bank Support, 2000–2010

Sponsor:  Independent Evaluation Group (IEG), Social Protection Team (WB)

Panelists:  Jennie Litvack (Lead Economist, IEGPS) and Ruslan Yemtsov (Lead Economist, HDNSP), CHAIR: Hans-Martin Boehmer (Senior Manager, IEGCS).

Events of the past decade have underscored the vital need for social safety nets (SSN) programs designed to protect the poor from economic shocks and contribute to reducing chronic poverty in all countries, especially in times of crisis. Over fiscal years 2000–10, the World Bank supported SSNs with $11.5 billion in lending and an active program of analytical and advisory services and knowledge sharing. The Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) of the World Bank evaluated the effectiveness of Bank-supported SSN programs and found that while Bank support has largely accomplished its stated short-term objectives and helped countries achieve immediate impacts, key areas of Bank support need strengthening.

Join IEG and World Bank management to learn what worked well for SSNs in countries and what improvements can be made going forward. For a copy of the evaluation report, please visit: http://ieg.worldbankgroup.org/content/ieg/en/home/reports/ssn.html

Participant List

Presentations:

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-100

Parliamentary Ethics and Conduct

Sponsor:  Global Organizations of Parliamentarians Against Corruption (GOPAC)

Panelists:  Ghassan Moukheiber (Member of Parliament Lebanon and Chair of the GOPAC Global Task Force on Parliamentary Ethics and Conduct), Mitchell O'Brien (Governance Specialist, WBI), Vinay Bhargava (Chief Technical Officer  - Partnership for Transparency Fund), CHAIR: John G. Williams  (GOPAC CEO and retired Canadian Member of Parliament),

Parliament is an accountability institution for government which is pivotal for ensuring transparency and probity.  However, the capacity of parliaments to play this important role hinges on the legitimacy of their members. A mechanism that can be used to enhance the ethical standards within parliament is a conduct regime, providing benchmarks by which society and the media can hold MPs accountable, and MPs hold themselves accountable.

The panel will provide parliamentarians, CSOs, and the media with an understanding of the issue and how standards of ethical conduct within legislative bodies can be improved. The panel will describe the constituent parts of a system of ethics and conduct and identify the key issues in developing and implementing such a system.

GOPAC’s Handbook on Parliamentary Ethics and Conduct creates the opportunity for CSOs, media, parliamentarians and others to unite behind a common cause of improving ethical behavior in public life. It provides a starting point to fulfill provisions of Article 8 of the United Nations Convention against Corruption which calls for the development of Codes of Conduct for Public Officials.

Participant List 

 

2:00 – 4:00
IMF HQ1
 R-710

TV DEBATE: Where are the Jobs: Generation Y Asks?

Sponsor:  IMF

Panelists:  Nemat Shafik (Deputy Managing Director, IMF), Samar Mezghanni  (Activist, Tunisia), Nikolai Pandurić (Croatian Youth network, Croatia), Jessica Colaço (iHub Manager, Kenya), Brent Gensler (Founder of DefySupply.com, US), CHAIR: Tsepiso Makwetla (South Africa Broadcast Corporation)

The financial crisis has created new challenges for the youth worldwide.  Amongst the most pressing issues for youth s are jobs.  In many parts of the world, youth unemployment rates are alarmingly high, leading to social unrest. The challenge for policymakers is to create a conducive macroeconomic environment for sustained growth that generates jobs and opportunities for the young generation. In formulating the right economic policies, policymakers should consider the views and perspectives of youth leaders. This is a platform for the IMF to listen to youth concerns about the current global financial situation and their future.

Key questions to be addressed in the seminar include:

  • How does the young generation perceive the financial crisis and its effect on unemployment in their regions?
  • What challenges do young people face in securing meaningful employment?
  • What is the Fund’s perspective on how countries should promote stable economic growth that will lead to increased employment opportunities for the young generation?
  • How does the young generation envision their future?
Video Recording

 

2:00 – 3:30
MC C1-100

Issues, Opportunities and Challenges in Implementing the Access to Information Policy in Country Offices

Sponsor:  World Bank, Bank Information Center (BIC)

Panelists:  Sergio Jellinek (Latin America and the Caribbean Region Communications Advisor, WB), Elisa Liberatori Prati (Chief Archivist, WB), Amy Ekdawi (Middle East and Northern Africa Program Manager), Aleem Walji (Manager, World Bank Institute), Paul Bermingham (Director, OPCOS, WB), CHAIR: Sumir Lal (Manager, External Affairs, WB).

This session will focus on the Access to Information Policy’s one-year implementation highlights and challenges, as well as set the stage for a dialogue on how the policy is used and implemented at the country level.  The panelists will address the policy’s implications in fostering civic participation, responding to the growing global demand for information and data, and opportunities for engagement with local CSOs.

 

2:00 – 3:30
MC C1-200

World Bank Policies / Financing on Coal

Sponsors: Vasudha Foundation, Bank Information Center (BIC), Sierra Club, Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), Oil Change International

Panelists:  Amulya Kumar Naya (Odisha Chas Parivesh Surekhsa Parishad, Odisha, India), Srinivas Krishnaswamy (Vasudha Foundation), Justin Guay (Sierra Club), Niranjali M. Amerasinghe (Center for International Environmental Law), CHAIR: Elizabeth Bast (Oil Change International)

India is witnessing a flurry of entrepreneurial activities which demonstrate the ability of decentralized, small scale renewable energy systems, combined with large scale energy efficiency measures, to support electrification and fill India’s energy supply deficit. Yet, the Bank’s country strategy to support India’s energy transition is unclear. The energy sector has the third largest share in World Bank’s nearly $40 billion worth of active and pipeline investments in India’s public sector. The largest portions of IBRD and IDA loans are exposed to restructuring the state-owned power utilities, hydro and large transmission projects, many of which are connected to ultra mega coal power plants.

Meanwhile, IFC’s energy investments include support to the coal industry as exemplified by financing the Tata Mundra Coal Plant in Gujarat and the GMR Thermal Power Plant in Odisha through a financial intermediary. A range of risks in these projects have been identified while their sustainability is in question. As the World Bank develops its India 2030 Vision, and closes in on the country’s exposure limit, how will it shift lending patterns to ensure an environmentally sustainable future? Will the plan pave the way for innovative approaches to energy access focused on aggregating decentralized clean energy systems or support a continued reliance on coal-based power?

Participant List

Presentations: 

3:00 – 4:30
MC 2-800

Smart Crowding for Climate Change

Sponsors:  World Bank

Panelists:  Mario Lubetkin (Director General, Inter Press Services), Paul Sparrow (Senior Vice President for Broadcasting and Media at the Newseum), Dr. Mohamed Nada (Project Manager and Advisor on Decentralization for the Strategic National Support Development Project), TMS Ruge (Lead Social Media Strategist for Connect4Climate Project at the World Bank)

Connect4Climate is a campaign, a contest, and a community of practice dedicated to raising awareness about climate change issues in Africa and globally.  Connect4Climate will engage African youth in the climate dialogue through Facebook and other social media channels and www.connect4climate.org.

The Connect4Climate Photo/Video Contest will challenge youth to share their personal climate change stories and their ideas for action. Winning entries will be exhibited at the UN Conference on Climate Change in Durban this December and at Rio+20 in June, 2012. Partners include UN agencies, CSOs, and media organizations.  This session will discuss ideas for the campaign and opportunities for institutional collaboration from the global to the local level.

 

4:00 – 5:30
MC C1-200

Plundered Nations?

Sponsor: Revenue Watch International

Panelists: Paul Collier (Professor, University of Oxford), Karin Lissakers (Executive Director, RWI )

In this session, Professor Collier will discuss the eight case studies documented in his new book, Plundered Nations? Successes and Failures in Natural Resource Extraction with Revenue Watch.  He will provide unique insight on the political economy of the decision chain, revealing where these various resource-rich countries have met with success, or failed disastrously. The other panelists will join in the conversation on how different countries have handled their resource extraction and what methods need to be taken in the future.

Participant List
Summary by Brettonwoods Project

 

4:00 – 5:30
MC C1-100

The Way Forward on Bank – Civil Society Relations

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Caroline Anstey (Managing Director, WB), Ingrid Srinath (Secretary General, Civicus), Baquer Namasi (Voices of the Poor Group, Iran), Lindsay Coats (Vice President, InterAction), CHAIR: John Garrison (Senior Civil Society Specialist, WB)

World Bank – Civil Society relations have improved significantly over the past 20 years and today is characterized by multifaceted forms of interaction ranging from policy dialogue and consultations, to operational collaboration and even grant funding.  Yet, as Mr. Zoellick stated in his Peterson Institute speech of April 2011, perhaps the time has come for the Bank to forge a new and more intense relationship with civil society.

Panelists will discuss what impact this speech and the prominent role played by CSOs in the Arab Spring can have in the evolving history of Bank – CSO relations.  In addition, what would scaling-up these relations mean in practice and what institutional and political constraints may limit intensified relations.

Participant List
Summary Note

4:00 – 5:00
L1-103
(2121 Pennsylvania Ave.)

CSO Conversation with Lars H. Thunell

Sponsors: International Finance Corporation

Panelists: Lars H. Thunell (Executive Vice President, IFC)

Lars Thunell will make initial remarks regarding recent policy and program developments at the IFC and respond to comments and questions.

 

5:00 – 6:00
L1-101
(2121 Pennsylvania Ave.)

Performance Standards Reception

Sponsor:  IFC

Panelists:  Bill Bulmer (IFC Director of the Environment, Social and Governance Department)

The review and update of IFC's Sustainability Framework was completed in May, 2011. Please join us for an update on implementation of the Framework. This will be followed by a reception celebrating the review and civil society's participation in the process.

 

6:00 - 7:30
MC 13 121 Foyer

Film Trailer Screening  & Reception

Sponsor:  International Alert

International Alert staff will show a 3 minute trailer of “’How’ Not ‘How Much’: International Institutions and Peace Building in Burundi, Liberia and Nepal”.  The film examines the delivery of international aid, from the perspective of ordinary men and women in partner countries, and explores some of the particular challenges, experiences, and good practices unique to these contexts.

* followed by a reception


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Thursday, September 22

8:30 am – 11:00
Main Complex Building 
Preston Auditorium

PROGRAM OF SEMINARS –  Global Development Debate on Jobs and Opportunities for All

Sponsors: World Bank

Panelists:  Saïd Aidi (Minister of Vocational Training and Employment, Tunisia), Nadeem Ul Haque (Deputy Chairman, Planning Commission, Ministry of Planning and Development, Pakistan), Stella Li  (Senior Vice President, BYD Company Limited, China), Alia El Mahdi (Dean of the Faculty of Economics and Political Science, Cairo University, Egypt),  Manish Sabharwal ( CEO, TeamLease, India), CHAIR: Chrystia Freeland (Global Editor-at-Large, Reuters, United States).

What drives job creation? This has become a challenging question in both developed and developing countries. For example, social unrest in a number of Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries has captured global attention because of its speed and contagion effects. While there are a number of contributing factors, stubbornly high levels of unemployment, particularly among youth, are a major source of dissatisfaction in the Middle East.

High unemployment has persisted even though a number of countries in the region have experienced strong economic growth in the past decade.
Therefore policies, complementing the ones being used to enhance economic growth, may be needed to stimulate employment creation. The unemployment problem is exacerbated by the youthful demographic bulge that calls for the creation of millions of jobs a year for the next 20 years in MENA, South Asia, and Africa. In addition, because many of the unemployed or underemployed are tertiary level graduates, mere employment creation may not suffice.

Archived webcast available here:

http://wbi.worldbank.org/wbi/event/global-development-debate-jobs-and-opportunities-all 

 

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-200

The Politics of Peace: Delivering Aid in Fragile and Conflict-Affected Countries

Sponsor:  International Alert

Panelists:  Nisha Pandey (Senior Programme Officer, International Alert Nepal Programme), Gary Milante ( WDR 2011 Team, WB), Tammi Sharpe  (United Nations Peace building Support Office, New York), CHAIR:  Cynthia Gaigals  (Peacebuilding Issues Manager, International Alert).

The release of the World Bank’s 2011 World Development Report (WDR) on Conflict, Security, and Development has the potential to change the way that international development aid is structured to respond to root causes of conflict and insecurity. This session will explore how emerging best practices at the policy level and in the field can be translated and transferred to strengthen the impact and effectiveness of institutions in the field.

The session will be an opportunity for discussion around the way that fragility impacts how international assistance is delivered, drawing on the experiences of a government official from a g7+ country.  Panelists will discuss how the ideas from the WDR can be practically applied to World Bank, UN, and bilateral engagements with these countries.  Lastly panelists will consider how the international institutions, donor and recipient countries alike can work together to support sustainable peace, stability and economic growth.

Participant List 

 

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-100

Multilateral Approaches for Engaging Civil Society

Sponsors:  UNDP, UNICEF, World Bank

Panelists:  Isabel Ortiz (UNICEF), Bharati Sadasivam (UNDP), John Garrison (World Bank), Laila Iskandar (CID, Egypt), CHAIR: Baquer Namazi (Voices of the Poor Group, Iran)

United Nations, Multilateral Development Banks, and other multilateral organizations have intensified relations with civil society in recent years.  Each sector and agency, however, has different strategies and approaches to engaging civil society.  This session will explore the benefits and challenges of these approaches and identify areas for collaboration, with particular reference on how to respond to voices on the streets. 

Specifically, the session will focus several issues:  how best to respond to the Arab Spring and strengthen civil society enabling environment;  lessons learned from experiences in other regions (South-South and North-South collaboration); strategies for building trust and confidence among stakeholders; and sharing good practices for enhancing interagency collaboration around community empowerment.

Participant List 

Presentations:

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-110

Prospects and Challenges of the Africa Mining Vision

Sponsor:  Third World Network Africa

Panelists:  Abdulai Darimani (Environment Programme Officer, TWN-Africa), Peter Sinkamba (Executive Director, Citizens for a Better Environment-Zambia), Paulo de Sa (Manager, Sustainable Energy, Oil, Gas and Mining, World Bank), CHAIR: Emira Woods (Co-Director, Foreign Policy in Focus, Institute for Policy Studies)

Two decades after the World Bank took the lead in liberalizing mining codes across Africa, the continent is united on the need to reform their mining codes to derive greater benefits. In 2008, the African Union adopted the African Mining Vision (AMV) 2050, which lays out a roadmap to achieve mining reforms on Africa’s own terms. Under the directive of the AU, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) constituted a body known as the International Study Group (ISG) to produce a report that would provide an intellectual basis for translating the AMV into policy. The report has been produced and was validated at a continent-wide meeting organised by the AU/UNECA in October 2010.

The AMV and the ISG Report represent a shift of orientation toward autonomous domestic mining policy-making on the continent. This shift of orientation requires the support of multilateral actors such as the World Bank in order to succeed. Meanwhile, the promotion of parallel initiatives such as the EU Raw Materials Initiative, the Natural Resource Charter and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) may work to either undermine or support the African reform agenda. While there is unity of purpose to reform Africa’s mining regimes, the quality and direction of the reform are uncertain.

This session will focus on the role of the World Bank and other actors in achieving the objectives set out in the AMV.

Participant List 

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-200

Role of Civil Society in Disaster Risk Reduction

Sponsor:  Cordaid

Panelists:  Sasja Kamil (CMDRR Senior Expert, Cordaid), Abebe Mekonnen (Program Director JECCDO, Ethiopia), Marcus Oxley (Chair of CSO Network on Disaster Risk Reduction), Doekle Wielinga  (Africa DRM Regional Coordinator, WB), CHAIR: Isaac Bekalo (IIRR, Nairobi)

Globally, the number of natural disasters is on the rise. National governments, donor agencies, and international institutions are doing their best to cope with floods, earthquakes and extreme droughts. But it local communities who takes the hardest blows of these disasters, who understand well their impact on the  environment, and who need to act first when risks rise and hazards become a threat to life, health and property.
In order to encourage local communities to take the lead and implement their own disaster response and management plans and hold governments to account, Cordaid has developed the community managed disaster risk reduction (CMDRR) approach.  CMDRR programmes are being implemented in ten countries, where it works intensively with over one hundred local organizations and their communities. 

The session will discuss the characteristics of the CMDRR programs, including drawing lessons learned from various countries.  Panelists will comment on what has worked, what should be improved, and how it is possible to scale up collaboration between governments, donor agencies and local communities.  See more information:
http://www.cordaid.nl/nl/Cordaid-workshop-expert-meeting.html

Participant List

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-100

World Bank Country-Level Engagement on Governance and Anticorruption: An Evaluation of the 2007 Strategy and Implementation Plan

Sponsor:  Independent Evaluation Group (IEG)

Panelists:  Navin Girishankar (Lead Evaluation Officer IEG Country and Corporate Evaluations),  Linda van Gelder (Director, Public Sector Governance Group), John Githongo (CEO, Inuka Kenya Trust), Christiaan Poortman (Sr. Adviser, Transparency International), CHAIR: Anna Brandt (Chair, Committee on Development Effectiveness, WB Board of Directors)

Building on more than two decades of experience, the World Bank’s 2007 governance and anticorruption (GAC) strategy reaffirmed the Bank's continuing commitment to the crucial and challenging agenda of helping countries develop accountable and effective states. IEG recently evaluated the relevance and the effectiveness of the 2007 strategy and implementation plan.

Findings indicated that the Bank has made some progress but also pointed to a number of important opportunities that have to be seized. Join IEG, World Bank management and a panel of experts to learn what is working and what can be done differently including in strengthening the demand for good governance. For copies of the evaluation report, visit: http://ieg.worldbankgroup.org/content/ieg/en/home/reports/gac.html

Participant List

Presentation:

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-110

Giving Oceans a Chance

Sponsor:  Conservation International (CI), World Bank

Panelists:  Sebastian Troeng (Vice President for Oceans, CI), Peter Kristensen (Lead Environment Specialist, WB)

Oceans cover more than 70 percent of the Earth's surface, provide 15 percent of animal protein for 3 billion people, and generate international trade worth over $100bn a year. They also absorb heat, produce oxygen, sequester carbon, regulate the climate, and provide sources of renewable energy. But they are under severe threat from overfishing, pollution, acidification, habitat loss and a general lack of protection. This panel will explore the threats, potential solutions and ways the World Bank is helping.

Participant List

 

11:30 – 1:00
MC 4 – 800

Open Data, Open Knowledge, Open Solutions: Possibilities and Pitfalls

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists:  Caroline Anstey (Managing Director, WB), Patrick Svenburg (Director, Government Platform Strategy, Microsoft), David Bonbright (CEO, Keystone Accountability), Nathaniel Heller (Managing Director, Global Integrity), Sue Pleming (Senior Director for Policy and Communications, InterAction), Aleem Walji (Manager, Innovation Practice, WBI).

In this lively moderated conversation, discussants will talk about the opportunities presented by open data, open knowledge, and open solutions and how these relate to development challenges and aid effectiveness. Topics will include: What are the success stories to learn from (inside and outside the Bank)? What are the potential limitations of “open”? How can we draw on knowledge, learning, and innovation from a much wider pool of ‘solvers’ and donor resources?

Archived webcast available here: 

http://wbi.worldbank.org/wbi/event/open-data-open-knowledge-open-solutions

 

12:00 – 1:15
IMF HQ 2

Atrium BBC WORLD DEBATE: Global Economy: A Tipping Point?

Sponsors: IMF, British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)

Panelists:  Mohamed El-Erian  (Chief Executive Officer, Pacific Investment Management Company, United States), Austan Goolsbee (Professor, University of Chicago Booth School of Business and Former Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, United States), Christine Lagarde  (Managing Director, International Monetary Fund), CHAIR:  Nik Gowing  (Anchor, BBC World News, United Kingdom).

The global recovery is losing momentum and risks are rising. In advanced economies, activity is slowing further and chances of falling back into recession are now higher. High unemployment, legacy problems in the financial sector, and high public debt constitute serious challenges. In a number of emerging markets, overheating pressures have been a concern and policies have been tightening, but there are also early signs of a slowdown.  The debate will focus on how policymakers could collaborate globally to boost the recovery and rebalance growth.
 

 

12:30 – 2:00
MC C1-100

Scaling up Climate Finance: A panel Discussion on the Evolving International Climate Finance Architecture

Sponsors:  World Resources Institute (WRI), Institute for Policy Studies (IPS), Conservation International (CI), Friends of the Earth/US (FoE), World Bank

Panelists: Andrew Steer (Special Envoy on Climate Change, WB), Rebecca Chacko (Senior Director of Climate Policy, CI), Janet Redman (Co-Director of the Sustainable Energy and Economy Network, IPS), Karen Orenstein (International Policy Analyst, FoE), Clifford Polycarp( Senior Associate, WRI), CHAIR:  Manish Bapna (Interim President, WRI), Representatives from Norway and/or South Africa (Co-Chairs of the Transitional Committee)

This panel discussion will focus on the evolving international climate finance architecture and the need for climate finance to meet the needs of developing countries by catalyzing transformation in their economies. The panel will focus in particular on the design of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) established by Parties to United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Cancun last December to support investments in climate change adaptation and mitigation activities in developing countries. A Transitional Committee (TC) has been tasked with leading the design process of the GCF and is expected to prepare its recommendations for the next Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC in Durban.

The panelists will exchange views on current climate financing needs, overarching principles to guide the Fund’s design, governance and institutional arrangements, operational modalities and relationships with other sources of climate finance, the role of the private sector, as well as civil society engagement and participation. They will also consider how climate finance can catalyze the scale up of investments necessary to urgently address climate change and thus gain greater legitimacy as a mechanism for delivering resources to developing countries.

 

1:00 – 2:00
MC C1-200

Speed Data-ing

Sponsor:  World Bank

Participants will have the opportunity to see live demos and presentations of Apps, the new Mapping for Results portal, and other online resources. Copies of the latest Development Outreach Magazine on Open Development and the Knowledge Report booklet will be available.
 

 

1:00 – 4:00
Preston Auditorium

Towards a New Social Contract in the Arab World: Global Lessons in Citizens Voice and Social Accountability - Experiences from Past Political and Economic Transitions

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists:  Robert Zoellick (President, WB),  Hazem El Beblawi (Egypt’s Deputy Minister for Economic Affairs and Finance Minister), Jelloul Ayad (Tunisia’s Minister of Finance),  Cevdet Yýlmaz (Turkey's Development Minister),  Corazon Soliman (Philippines’ Secretary for the Department of Social Welfare and Development), Dewi Fortuna Anwar (Indonesia’s Deputy Secretary to the Vice President for Political Affairs), CHAIR:  Marcus Noland (Deputy Director and Senior Fellow at the Petersen Institute).

Citizens across the Middle East and North Africa have taken to the streets demanding voice and participation. On April 6, World Bank Group President Robert B. Zoellick called for a new social contract for development in the region.

In the spirit of the movement towards greater accountability and transparency, the World Bank will host an event bringing high-level decision makers and civil society representatives in the Middle East and North Africa around the table to exchange knowledge and reflect on the experiences of others. Experts from Indonesia, Turkey and Philippines will share work done to support the development of social accountability during transitions.
 

 

2.00 - 3.30
MC4-800

Public Infrastructure (CoST): What Should the Public Expect?

Sponsor:  World Bank, Transparency International (TI), ONE

Panelists: Paul Collier (Professor of Economics, Oxford University), Vincent Lazatin (Executive Director TAN Philippines & Chairman, CoST Philippines), Christiaan Poortman (Adviser, Transparency International & Chair, CoST Interim Board), Chair: Rajiv Lall (Managing Director & CEO, Infrastructure Development Finance Company Limited).

CoST is a global transparency initiative between CSOs, governments, private sector, academics and donor agencies which has been piloted over the past three years in 8 countries:  Ethiopia, Guatemala, Malawi, Philippines, Tanzania, the UK, Vietnam and Zambia.  CoST improves the accuracy, breadth, and consistency of information released by governments on publicly funded construction projects.  In each country implementation is managed by multi-stakeholder groups that are representative of the public and private sector and civil society. CoST has begun to broaden participation to new countries, deepen implementation within the pilot countries, and incorporate new donor and supporting partners.  www.constructiontransparency.org 

 

2:00 – 3:30
MC C1-200

Implementation of Financial Transactions Taxes

Sponsors: Oxfam International, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), Institute for Policy Studies (IPS)

Panelists: Victoria Perry (Chief, Fiscal Affairs Department's Tax Policy Division), Max Lawson (Head of Policy and Advocacy, Oxfam/GB), CHAIR:  Peter Bakvis (Director, ITUC/Global Unions - Washington Office).

This panel will discuss several recent developments in the debate over financial transactions taxes.  For example, the European Commission included such taxes in its budget proposal and the French and German finance ministers shared with the Commission their proposals for how such taxes should be administered.  In addition, the IMF has continued to produce useful research on the issue, including, most recently, the working paper “Taxing Financial Transactions: An Assessment of Administrative Feasibility.” 

Participant List

Presentations:

 

2:00 – 3:30
M C C1-110

Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) Civil Society Partnership Strategy

Sponsor: Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), World Bank Group (WBG)

Panelists: Ralph Connery (GFDRR Civil Society Focal Point), CHAIR: Marcus Oxley (Chair of CSO Network on Disaster Risk Reduction)

The World Bank-hosted Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) was established in 2006 to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural hazards and adapt to climate change. The strategy is being prepared against the backdrop of an external environment where disasters have increased in frequency and intensity in recent years. Recent reports by United Nations, World Bank, and the Global Network of Civil Society Organizations for Disaster Reduction, have highlighted the need for partnerships at all levels, and maintain that where communities, civil society organizations and governments enter into partnership, the scale of disaster risk management efforts can be increased considerably.

This session will provide CSOs the opportunity to provide input and feedback on the proposed GFDRR Civil Society Partnership strategy and Pilot Fund for Community Action. Please visit www.gfdrr.org/civilsociety to review the GFDRR Civil Society Strategy paper, available in Arabic, English, French, and Spanish.

Participant List

Presentations:

 

2:00 – 3:30
MC C1-100

Importance and Role of CSOs in Global Partnerships to Achieve their Goals on the Ground

Sponsor: Education for All Fast Track Initiative, Global Environment Facility and Cities Alliance

Panelists: William Ehlers (Global Environment Facility, Team Leader, External Affairs), Patricia Zurita (Critical Ecosystems Partnership Fund, Executive Director), Lawrence Connell (Conservation International , Director, Multilateral Funding), Steve Weir (Habitat for Humanity, Vice President), Luis Crouch (Global Partnership for Education, Coordinator Global Good Practice Team), CHAIR: John Ruthrauff (InterAction, Director International Advocacy)

Global Partnerships for Development have become prominent mechanisms to address complex issues such as universal education, health, climate change, and urban development. There has been a visible shift from perceiving global programs as mere global funds to seeing them as global partnerships, and the advantages this offers. Those global partnerships recently have improved their business models to fit the partnership model and challenges of the 21st century. The Global Environment Facility, Cities Alliance and Education for All Fast Track Initiative are working with partner governments, bilateral and multilateral donor agencies, CSOs, and the private sector at the global and country levels. 

On the other hand, Civil society organizations (CSOs) have become an increasingly important partner to advocate and promote the attainment of national development targets and the MDGs.  CSOs have become important players to influence, participate, and monitor policy discussions, track public expenditure and to hold governments accountable. In the run up to the 4th High-Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness it has been underlined that CSOs play a critical role for country ownership, results, and accountability.

This session will discuss the important role CSOs play in implementation of Global Partnerships, but also examine the challenges they face to become more effective and credible partners. How can donor agencies support their capacity development and ensure sustainable funding for them to fulfill their roles within global partnerships.

Participant List

Presentation:

   Sponsors 

 

2:30 – 4:30
MC 2 - 800

More and Better Jobs in South Asia

Sponsor: World Bank

Speakers:  Welcoming Remarks: Sri Mulyani Indrawati (Managing Director, WB), Isabel Guerrero (Vice President for South Asia Region, WB);

Panelists:  Omar Zakhilwal (Finance Minister, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan), Wahiduddin Mahmud (Professor, Dhaka University, Bangladesh), Manish Sabharwal (CEO, TeamLease India), Martin Rama  (Lead Economist, Development Research Group, WB), Arvind Subramanian (Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics); CHAIR: Kalpana Kochhar (Chief Economist for South Asia Region, WB)

South Asia has enjoyed high economic growth and poverty reduction over the past two decades, yet South Asia is still home to more than ½ billion poor people. It has the worst nutrition indicators when compared to other regions. Most of the countries are recently out of conflict or remain under conflict and it faces difficult gender and social issues. In addition, even under conservative assumptions, the region will have to generate more than 1 million jobs every month for the next two decades equivalent to about 40% of the additions to the labor force worldwide. According to the flagship report, South Asia is, and will continue to be for decades to come, the largest contributor to the global labor force.

  • Key questions to be addressed include:
    Has South Asia been creating an increasing number of jobs and better jobs?
  • What are the determinants of the quality of job creation and what is the employment challenge going forward?
  • What demand and supply-side bottlenecks need to be eased to meet South Asia’s employment challenge in the face of intensifying demographic pressure?

* Wine and cheese reception served 

 

3:30 – 5:00
MC C1-100

Climate Adaptation: the Role of Natural Infrastructure in Sustainable Development

Sponsor: Conservation International (CI)

Panelists: David Hole (Director, Conservation Priorities, CI), Marea E. Hatziolos (Senior Coastal and Marine Specialist, WB), Joanne Sonenshine (Director, Climate Strategy, CI), Emily Pidgeon (Senior Director, Marine Climate Change, CI), CHAIR: John Matthews (Director, Global Water Adaptation, CI), USAID Representative.

Adapting to climate change is a persistent global challenge.  While traditional risk management and development approaches have relied on hard infrastructure, climate impacts are rendering these more expensive and less sustainable.  Alternatively, studies such as the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (WRI, 2005), Convenient Solutions to an Inconvenient Truth (World Bank, 2009), and The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (UNEP, 2010) have underscored the value and potential contributions of natural ecosystems and the services they provide. 

Climate impacts affect people in countless ways: decreased access to freshwater, fisheries decline, and coastal flooding and degradation.  Recognizing how harmful these impacts are to peoples’ livelihoods and  and building on the studies cited above, Conservation International is working to develop ecosystem-based approaches to climate adaptation (EbA). 

In this session, CI will present its global coastal vulnerability assessment approach; input from freshwater climate field projects; its partnership with the World Bank on water adaptation; and case studies from coastal adaptation work, all with a view to using EbA to achieve sustainable development solutions. Discussants from the World Bank and U.S. government will participate in the panel.

Participant List

Presentation:

3:30 – 5:00
MC C1-110

Deepening World Bank Open Access Initiative through the External Implementation Status Report (E-ISRs):  An African Experience

Sponsors:  CSO Consultative Group on the World Bank (CCG) – Nigeria, World Bank

Panelists:  Virginia Ifeadiro (National Coordinator CCG, Nigeria), Tim Aniebonam (CCG - Nigeria), Florence Dennis (GACC, Ghana), Kadi Jumu (Christian Aid, Sierra Leone), Johannes Kiess (World Bank Institute), CHAIR: Sahr Kpundeh (Africa Region, WB).

We've known for at least 10 years that informed citizens can make projects function better.  But as a Bank, we've done very little about this in our own projects.  A new initiative seeks to change this, the External Implementation Status and Results Reports Plus Initiative.  It is a systematic way to inform the true owners of a project -- the citizens of a country -- about what the project is and what it's meant to accomplish, and just as importantly, a way to solicit -- again, systematically -- citizen reactions to the pace and value-added of project implementation. 

The session will review highlights and take stock of the challenges and impact of the ongoing pilots in Nigeria and Ghana.   It will also look at on-going collaboration with the WBI Mapping team to link E-ISR Plus with the Mapping for Results initiative, which consists of geo-referencing all active Bank projects and building maps to visualize Bank operations at the country, project, and sector levels.  The WBI team will discuss a new pilot that links this work to innovative uses of technology to improve project accountability across the Region.  This will enable citizens to provide actionable and timely feedback on projects results in an open and transparent manner, which will drive responsive and informed decisions by Bank and government counterparts.

Participant List

Presentation:

 

3:30 – 5:00
MC C1-200

Voices from the African Rainforest: Is the World Bank listening?

Sponsors:  Greenpeace, Global Witness

Panelists:  Reiner Tegtmeyer (Senior Forest Campaigner, Global Witness), Alphonse Muhindo (Secrétaire Général, Réseau pour la Conservation et la Réhabilitation des Ecosystèmes Forestiers, Democratic Republic of Congo), Susanne Breitkopf (Senior Policy Advisor, Greenpeace International), Silas Siakor (2006 Goldman Environmental Prize Winner and Director, Sustainable Development Institute, Liberia), CHAIR: David Young (Forest Team Leader, Global Witness)

Please join us for a film screening, presentations and a panel discussion on the impacts, challenges, and opportunities for World Bank engagement on forest issues in Central and West Africa. The event will feature a short film produced by Global Witness, and CSO speakers from Liberia and the Democratic Republic of Congo, as well as panelists from international NGOs working in the region.  The speakers and film will provide an on-the-ground picture and critical assessment of the social and environmental outcomes of Bank-supported efforts to develop and implement industrial logging concession systems in Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Liberia.

Participant List

Presentations:

5:00  - 6:30
IMF HQ2
Conference Hall 1

 

Civil Society Townhall Meeting

Sponsors:  International Monetary Fund, World Bank Group

Speakers: Christine Lagarde (Managing Director, IMF), Robert Zoellick (President,WBG), Laila Iskandar (Managing Director, Community and Institutional Development Group, Egypt), Milwida M. Guevara (President, Synergia Foundation, Philippines), CHAIR: Ingrid Srinath (Secretary General, Civicus)

This townhall is for CSO representatives accredited to the Annual Meetings. Mess. Iskandar and Guevara will make initial remarks on Fund and Bank policies, to be followed by comments from Ms.Lagarde, and Mr.Zoellick.  This will be followed by a general discussion on issues of concern to CSO representatives.

Summary Note
Video Recording
Transcript 

 

6:45  - 8:00
IMF HQ2
Mezzanine

Civil Society Welcome Event

Sponsors:  International Monetary Fund, World Bank

The event will be hosted by Gerry Rice (Acting Director of the External Relations Department, IMF) and Caroline Anstey (Managing Directo, World Bank).
 

 

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Friday, September 23

9:00 am – 10:30
 MC C1-110

Strengthening Natural Resource Governance in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Sponsor:  Global Witness, Christian Aid

Panelists: David McNair (Principal Economic Justice Adviser, Christian Aid), Daniel Balint-Kurti (Campaign Leader for DRC, Global Witness), Corinna Gilfillan (Head of US Office, Global Witness)

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is one of the most mineral rich countries on earth, with natural resources including diamonds, copper, gold, tin, oil and natural gas. Yet despite its geological riches DRC remains one of the poorest countries in Africa, ranking 168 out of 169 on the Human Development Index.

So, how can the DRC’s government and people realize greater benefit from their natural resources? Global Witness and Christian Aid will discuss the steps which civil society, the DRC government, donor agencies, and regulators can take to ensure natural resources are managed in a transparent, effective, and accountable way. Global Witness will focus on discussing the need for greater disclosure over how companies get access to resources and on what terms, and what  stronger action is needed to halt the trade in minerals fuelling conflict and human rights abuses in eastern DRC.  Christian Aid will discuss ongoing research into the issue of transfer mispricing, and how this appears to be depriving DRC of huge sums in tax revenues.

Participant List 

 

9:00 am – 10:30
 MC C1-200

Domestic Debt: The New Front of Debt Crisis In Africa – The Case of Kenya

Sponsors:  Kenya Debt Relief Network (KENDREN), African Forum and Network on Debt and Development (AFRODAD), International Monetary Fund (IMF) , Reality of Aid Africa (ROA –Africa)

Panelists:  Kiama Kaara (Programmes Coordinator - Kenya Debt Relief Network – KENDREN), Collins Magalasi  (Executive Director – Africa Forum and Network on Debt and Development – AFRODAD),  Laurence Allain (Strategy and Policy Review Department, IMF).

Increased demand on national budgets due to their service cost, shrinking overseas development aid in light of the global financial crisis,  and the roll back of donor support to cover budget deficit, have led African Governments to resort to borrowing from the domestic market in order to plug budget deficits. It has become increasingly critical to look at the linkages of domestic debt and the role it plays in the African economy as an important monetary facility for development.

The Kenya Debt Relief Network (KENDREN), has just concluded a research on domestic debt in Kenya in which it seeks to discern whether the new upsurge in domestic debt in African countries could be a precursor to a new debt crisis cycle.  A key feature of this reality is that domestic debt attracts expensive interest rates in terms of servicing. Attendant arguments are that it crowds out domestic investors and reduces incentives for domestic banks to mobilize deposits and lending to other sectors. These pressures could result in liquidity risks. This panel will seek to critically discuss this looming debt issue in light of the importance that domestic debt has gained in the Kenyan economy and try to draw lessons on whether this also applies to other African countries. 

Participant List

Presentation:

 

9:00 am – 10:30
 MC C1-100

Safeguards and Climate Finance in Indonesia in the Context of REDD+

Sponsors:  Heinrich Boell Foundation,  Ulu Foundation, 11.11.11

Panelists:  Pol Vandevoort (11.11.11, Belgium), Titi Soentoro (NGO Forum on the ADB, Indonesia), Stephanie Fried (Ulu Foundation, Hawaii), Risma Umar (Solidaritas Perempu, Indonesia), Benoit Bosquet (Lead Carbon Finance Specialist, WB)

Indonesia has the third largest tropical forest area on earth.  In 2009, Indonesia’s President, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, made an extraordinary commitment to play a significant role in global efforts to prevent climate change by announcing that Indonesia would cut greenhouse gas emissions 26% by 2020 and, if sufficient international support were available, would make emissions cuts of up to 41%. This has served to place Indonesia at the heart of a range of international climate finance efforts designed to provide support for a reduction in deforestation rates.

As a result, a wide range of REDD+ “readiness” pilot projects and forest conservation efforts supported by the World Bank Group, other multilateral, bilateral and private funds have begun to operate in Indonesia.  The ultimate impact of potentially significant flows of international finance to Indonesia in support of reducing deforestation, however, is likely to depend upon whether sufficient attention is paid to the design, implementation, and enforcement of robust and stringent social, environmental, transparency and governance safeguards.  This panel will explore case studies of various existing and proposed World Bank Group, bilateral and privately-funded REDD+ and forest conservation efforts in Indonesia.

Participant List

 

10:00 am – 11:00
Room 400 / 12th floor
(1800 G Street, NW)

MIGA Open House for CSOs

Sponsor:  Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA)

This session will provide an opportunity for CSO representatives to meet with MIGA staff to learn more about MIGA and to discuss any issues of concern.  CSO representatives wishing to attend may contact Cara Santos Pianesi at csantospianesi@worldbank.org.

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-200

The International Year of the Youth: A Success or Failure?

Sponsor:  Arab Thought Foundation

Panelists: Ingrid Srinath (Secretary General, CIVICUS - World Alliance for Citizens Participation), Nikola Panduric (President, Croatian Youth Network), Mariam Abu Adas (Head of youth Program and deputy Dircetor, The Arab Foundation for Sustainable Development), CHAIR: Samar Samir Mezghanni (Youth Consultant, Arab Thought Foundation).

Participant List 

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-100

Ownership and Results in the Busan agenda: if it’s Hard to Count, Does it Still Count?

Sponsor:  Oxfam International

Panelists:  M. Peter McPherson (President, Association of Public and Land Grant Universities; Former Administrator, USAID), Sheila Herrling (Vice President, Policy and International Relations, Millennium Challenge Corporation), Nader Nadery (Commissioner, Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission), Richard Ssewakiryanga (Executive Director, Uganda National NGO Forum), CHAIR: Paul O’Brien (Vice President for Policy and Campaigns, Oxfam America)

In the lead up to the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness, donor governments are under tremendous fiscal and political pressure to show results. This pressure for results could lead to more effective aid – or it could lead to bad aid with a shiny veneer.  How do we ensure that the right kind of results agenda is gaining momentum going into Busan?
Join us for a conversation that will unpack the risks and the appeal of a focus on results:

  • How can a focus on results lead to stronger country ownership?
  • Which results matter and to whom?
  • Are donors ensuring that a focus on ‘results’ does not come at the cost of long term, empowering aid interventions that are hard to count?
  • How should donors measure the effect of their aid on human rights?
  • How should governments ensure that a focus on the Paris Principle of “Mutual Accountability for Results” does not come at the expense of other Paris and Accra principles, particularly “Ownership” and “Inclusive partnerships”?

Panelists will discuss how HLF4 can support a vision of results that consistent with the principles of country ownership, and has a maximum impact on the lives of people living in poverty.  This session will be Webcast via the link below, which becomes Live 30 minutes before the session starts:

Participant List 
Video of Session (produced by Oxfam)

See also Oxfam's recent publication on the topic titled: The 'Right' Results: Making sure the results agenda remains committed to poverty reduction. 

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-110

Investor-State Arbitration in Developing Countries

Sponsor:  International Law Institute

Panelists:  Meg Kinnear (Secretary General, International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes,  ICSID); Professor Don Wallace (Chairman of the International Law Institute);  Ian Laird (Special Legal Consultant at Crowell & Moring); CHAIR: Martin Endicott (Arbitrator)

In times of great financial distress and widespread political turmoil, more and more voices argue that developing countries are facing a disproportionate number of investment claims.  Others note that investors lose the majority of cases or are awarded considerably less than they claim.  Objectively speaking, the number of investment disputes has consistently grown over the past 10 years.  Some of these cases settle, others take years to resolve, and on the whole, important governmental resources are spent on legal battles and compensation payments. 

The purpose of this panel event is not to quantify losses and reduce the analysis to a statistical report.  Rather, it aims to highlight current investment arbitration trends in developing countries and to consider whether a host states’ level of development affects the international law standards of full protection and security and fair and equitable treatment.

Presentation:

 

12:30 – 2:00
MC C1-100

Sustainable Energy initiatives in BASIC countries

Sponsor: BASIC South Initiative, Oil Change International (US), Friends of the Earth Amazon (Brazil), Vasudha Foundation (India), Greenovate (China), groundWork South Africa

Panelists:  Red Constantino (Executive Director, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Philippines), Srinivas Krishnaswamy (CEO, Vasudha Foundation, India), Lo Sze Ping (Executive Director, Forward Works/Greenovate, China), Gustavo Pimentel (Eco-Finance Manager, Friends of the Earth, Brazilian Amazon, Brazil), William Prindle (Vice President, ICF International), Hoai Huynh (Principal, ICF International)

Over the next few decades, increased energy demands alongside technological and financing innovation are expected to come increasingly from China and India. For example, China invests more than any other nation in environmental-friendly energy production: $34 billion in 2009, or twice as much as the United States. Brazil, for its part, exerts huge sway in its region due to growing economic and financial clout. South Africa is seen as promoting a development model for Sub-Saharan Africa, where economic growth in several countries are now among the highest in the world.

BASIC countries are today considered central actors for sustainably addressing global climate, energy, and development challenges. Aside from the potential to dramatically bring down domestic emissions trajectories over the next few decades while introducing massive local co-benefits, the energy choices that BASIC countries make will be central to the rapid development and commercial deployment of new, more efficient and cost-effective sustainable energy solutions that can address energy poverty reduce GHG emissions globally while ensuring energy supplies and economic development imperatives are met.  This session will analyze and discuss the energy policy choices available to the BASIC countries.

Participant List

 

1:00 pm - 2:00
H Auditorium
800 – 19th St.

PROGRAM OF SEMINARS – Gender Equality Matters: The Way Forward

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists: Ramzia Abbas Aleryani (General Secretary, General Arab Women Union, and Chairperson, Yemeni Women Union, Yemen), Caroline Anstey (Managing Director, World Bank Group), Kaushik Basu  (Chief Economic Advisor to the Government, India), Naila Chowdhury (Chief Executive Officer, Grameen Solutions, Bangladesh), Ib Peterson (State Secretary for Development Policy, Denmark), John Rwangombwa (Minister, Ministry of Finance, Rwanda), CHAIR:  Gillian Tett (US Managing Editor, Financial Times, United States).

 Gender equality matters for development, as shown in this year's World Development Report (WDR). It matters because it is a core development objective in its own right, and because gender equality is smart economics - it can improve other development outcomes as well as the prospects for the next generation. It also matters for development policy-making because broad-based economic development closes some, although not all, gender disparities.

While the last quarter century has seen the unprecedented narrowing of many gender gaps in education, health and labor market opportunities, not all gender disparities shrink with economic development. Therefore, corrective policies are needed to focus especially on the gaps that persist even as countries get richer. Bringing a gender perspective to development policy-making can also help make other policies more effective, even when they do not target gender equality itself.

Key questions to be addressed include:

  • Where is the payoff for development from addressing gender disparities potentially the largest?
  • Where do higher incomes by themselves reduce gender gaps?
  • Where would reorientation of policies yield the greatest benefit?

 

2:00 – 3:30
MC C1-200

Jobs in the Middle East and North Africa: Opening Up Opportunities for All

Sponsor:  Middle East and North Africa Region (WB)

Panelists:  Roberta Gatti (Sector Manager and Lead Economist, Middle East and North Africa Region), Rebekka Grunm,  Diego Angel-Urdinola, Stefanie Brodmann, and Matteo Morgandi (Economists, MENA Region), CHAIR: Dale Lautenbach (Communications Advisor, MENA Region)

The Arab Spring has shown the powerful consequences of exclusion and high levels of youth unemployment in the MENA region and jobs are at the forefront of attention. The moment is right to re-shape the institution’s mandate to provide employment and training services and to promote reforms that create jobs through a social dialogue that is truly inclusive and involves youth, women, informal workers and the unemployed.

In this context, the World Bank is undertaking an in-depth study of jobs and employment in the MENA region. The study aims at documenting the challenges to employment and quality job creation while at the same time promoting an open dialogue on reform of labor market institutions and skill development systems to the benefit of the citizens of MENA. This session follows the spirit of our motivation and invites CSOs to help shape our work in the region.  

Participant List

 

2:00 – 3:30
MC C1-110

Discussion with the Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman

Sponsor:  Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman (CAO)

Panelists:  Meg Taylor, Vice President and CAO staff

The CAO are holding this open session to provide an update of current cases and activities, answer questions, and facilitate discussion on topics of interest to civil society participants.

Participant List

Presentation:

 

3:00 – 5:00
J 1 – 050

Ensuring Nutrition and Food Security for Results in South Asia

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists:  Opening remarks:  Isabel Guerrero, World Bank Vice President for South Asia Region

Speakers:  Isabel Guerrero (Vice President for South Asia Region, WB), Kalpana Kocchar (Chief Economist for South Asia Region, WB), Santiago Levy (Vice President for Sectors and Knowledge, Inter-American Development Bank), Kul Gautam (Deputy Executive Director, UNICEF), Memood Khan (CEO, Pepsico's Global Nutrition Group).

South Asia has the highest prevalence of malnutrition in the world.  However many policy makers do not fully appreciate the degree to which malnutrition exacerbates poverty and poor learning outcomes, nor are they all fully convinced that malnutrition will not simply be resolved through untargeted broader poverty reduction initiatives. Many still equate malnutrition with emergency and famine situations--not recognizing that the greatest burden of malnutrition in the region is chronic, and often invisible.

Over the past few years, the World Bank has been scaling up its efforts to support clients in improving nutrition and food security. This session will cover how malnutrition undermines the development aims of the countries in the South Asia Region, how agriculture and food security contribute to nutrition outcomes, and what the South Asia Region of the Bank is doing in response.

* Wine and cheese reception served 

 

4:00 – 5:30
MC C1-100

Update on WB Safeguards Review Process

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists:  Joachim von Amsberg (Vice President, OPCS/WB), Bruce Jenkins (Independent Consultant), Stephen Lintner (Senior Advisor, WB)

This session will be an information-sharing, open forum on the review process for updating and consolidating the World Bank’s environmental and social safeguard policies. A brief introduction by the Bank and CSO discussant will provide an overview of key issues. This will be followed by an informal discussion where participants who will have the opportunity to express their views and suggestions for the review process.

Participant List

  

4:00 – 5:30
MC C1-200

Consultation on a New OECD Strategy on Development

Sponsor:  Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

Panelists:  Jon Lomøy (Director, Development Co-operation Directorate, OECD), Ebba Dohlman (Senior Adviser, Policy Coherence for Development, Office of the Secretary-General, OECD), CHAIR: Jenny Bisping (OECD Civil Society Liaison).

Based on its longstanding experience on development work, particularly through the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and the Development Centre, the OECD is committed to adopt a new comprehensive approach to development. This will entail fine-tuning its policy advice in a way that recognizes the prevailing conditions in developing countries. It also aims to widen partnerships with developing countries, opening up opportunities for mutual learning, greater sharing of policy successes and failures and collective standard setting.  In doing so, the OECD will ensure that the broader policies pursued by its members are coherent with the goal to promote worldwide development.

The overall aim for the strategy is to consolidate OECD’s role as an open and inclusive forum for policy dialogue, mutual learning, and knowledge sharing as a means to strengthen its contribution to poverty reduction, sustainable development, and inclusive growth. This session will allow OECD staff to hear the views of CSOs on various key elements of the new strategy as it is being developed. For more information please refer to this short background document.

Participant List

 

4:00 – 5:00
MC C1-110

Update on IFC's Agribusiness Strategy

Sponsor:  International Finance Corporation (IFC)

Panelists:  Vipul Prakash (IFC Senior Manager for Agribusiness)

Vipul will discuss IFC's policies and investments on agribusiness.

Participant List

Presentation:

 

4:30 - 6:00
MC10-507

Inspection Panel Open House

Sponsor:  Inspection Panel (WB)

The Inspection Panel is the independent accountability mechanism of the World Bank.  The Panel invites all civil society representatives attending the Annual Meetings, and Bank Management and staff to its Open House in the Panel's offices. Please come and share your experiences and hear stories and anecdotes about Panel operations

 

5:15 - 7:00
MC 2-800

PROGRAM OF SEMINARS – High Level Dialogue on Humanitarian Assistance and  Disaster Resilience

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Robert B. Zoellick (President, World Bank Group), Sadako Ogata (President, Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA), Valerie Amos (United Nations Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator), Helen Clark (Administrator, United Nations Development Programme),  Kristalina Georgieva (Commissioner, International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response, European Commission), Andrew Mitchell (Secretary of State for International Development, United Kingdom), Rajiv Shah (Administrator, US Agency for International Development, United States), Jun Azumi (Minister of Finance, Japan).

With images of the devastation caused by the Great Tohoku earthquake and tsunami still fresh in our minds, we are now witnessing the greatest humanitarian crisis in decades in the Horn of Africa. The imperative of disaster resilience is the common thread between these very different but equally tragic events. Multilateral and bilateral donors will engage in a high level dialogue to discuss how humanitarian and development policy makers can work together to support the common objective of building resilience in communities and nations. Key questions to be addressed include: 

  • What are the main barriers and obstacles for close coordination and cooperation between development and humanitarian actors?
  • What are the right instruments to build resilience and facilitate cooperation between humanitarian and development actors?
  • How can international aid financing better support the resilience agenda and enhance coordination between development and humanitarian communities? – How can bilateral donors support this through the way in which they designate and allocate aid? – How can multilateral aid organizations improve and enhance their coordination?
     

 

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Saturday, September 24

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-100

The IMF and the FSB:  Strategy workshop on the two Global Financial Rule-Makers

Sponsor:  New Rules for Global Finance

Panelists:  Matthew Martin (Development Finance International), Eric Le Compte (Jubilee Network, USA), Todd Tucker (Public Citizen), Per Kurwoski (Former World Bank Executive Director, Venezuela), Dave Kane (Maryknoll Center for Global Concerns), Amar Bhattacharya  (Secretariat, G24), Victor Murinde (Director, African Development Bank Institute), CHAIR: Jo Marie Griesgraber (New Rules for Global Finance).

This session continues the discussion of the Spring Meetings that linked the Financial Stability Board agenda with NGO advocacy on trade, debt, tax, and speculation (derivatives/food-fuel).  While reviewing what steps have been taken since April, panelists will discuss:  how do we work together most effectively on the IMF and FSB to promote pro-poor, sustainable agendas in transparent, accountable, and inclusive institutions?  We will discuss priorities for our focused work going forward.  A new “SB Watch” website will be launched during the session.

Participant List 

 

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-200

Global Dignity Forum

Sponsor:  Operation Hope

Panelists:  Jena Roscoe (SVP, GRPP, Operation HOPE, Inc.); Angela R. Johnson (Director - Government Relations/Constituency Outreach Leon H. Sullivan Foundation); Marilyn S. Hoosen (Financial Advisor Morgan Stanley/Smith Barney).

Video Presentation of Global Dignity and Video Remarks by Global Dignity Campaign/Shannon Campbell

For more, please visit:  www.globaldignity.org 

Participant List

 

11:00 – 12:30
H Auditorium
19th & G St.

The Future of Trade Policy: A Growing Role for the South

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists:  Celso Lafer (Professor, Faculty of Law, University of São Paulo; and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Brazil), Mike Moore (Ambassador to the United States, New Zealand and former Director General of the World Trade Organization (WTO), Arvind Subramanian (Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics and the Center for Global Development, United States), Martin Wolf (Chief Economics Commentator, Financial Times, United Kingdom), Ernesto Zedillo (Director, Yale Center for the Study of Globalization, Yale University, United States), CHAIR: Zanny Minton Beddoes (Economics Editor, The Economist, United States).

Panelists will discuss the "quiet trade policy diplomacy" of the growing economic power houses and its impact on other developing economies. Emerging economies are active trade policy reformers using preferential regimes, bilateral relations and lowering transaction costs; as a result South-South trade has grown faster than average, but protection remains higher in the South. Finally, the roundtable will lead to a reflection on what the new balance of power means for future multilateral and regional cooperation on trade.  Key questions to be addressed include:

  • What is the impact and current role of emerging economies on trade policies? Should emerging countries keep such levels or consider a full embrace of freer trade? 
  •  What could be the contribution of BRICs to a "development package" for LDCs to help salvage the Doha trade negotiations? Can BRICs offer duty and quota free access to their markets and move from large net importers of commodities from LDCs to allowing these countries to export manufactures? What are the prospects for trade agreements between the BRICs and major OECD nations such as the EU, which has made regional approaches a more prominent pillar of its trade strategy? 
  • Is this a policy area where unilateral or minilateral action (for example the G-20) holds greater promise? 

Archived webcast available here:

http://wbi.worldbank.org/wbi/event/future-trade-policy-growing-role-south 


 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-100

Macro-Economic Policy in the Eurozone:  Are There Alternatives to Slow Growth and High Unemployment?

Sponsor:  Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)

Panelists:  Mark Weisbrot (Co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research), Luc Everaert (Assistant Director of the European Department at the International Monetary Fund)

The Eurozone economies, as a group, have still not caught up with their pre-recession level of GDP.  Now, France’s economy has stalled in the second quarter, and Germany’s economy has barely grown.  Although the ECB’s recent decision to buy Italian and Spanish bonds quelled the most acute crisis facing the Eurozone, there are many challenges ahead.  This session will discuss current macroeconomic policy in Europe and the challenges to reviving growth in the Eurozone, as well as policies to promote employment, and to resolve the debt crisis.

Participant List 

Presentation:

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-200

The Experience of the CAO in the former Soviet Union: 2004-2011

Sponsor: Crude Accountability

Panelists: Manana Kochladze (Green Alternative, Republic of Georgia), Svetlana Anosova, Zhasil Dala (Green Steppe, Kazakhstan), Igor Golubenkov  (Saving Taman!, Russian Federation), Sergey Solyanik (Crude Accountability, Kazakhstan), CHAIR: Kate Watters (Crude Accountability)
 
Crude Accountability (US), Saving Taman! (Russia), Green Steppe (Kazakhstan), and Green Alternative (Georgia) present a session on the experience of working with the Office of Compliance, Advisor/Ombudsman (CAO), the Independent Accountability Mechanism for people affected by IFC and MIGA projects.  After eight years of filing formal complaints with the CAO, Crude Accountability and our partners have amassed significant experience engaging with this office.  Activists on the Taman Peninsula in Russia and at the Karachaganak Oil and Gas Field in Kazakhstan have each filed three complaints. Activists in Georgia, together with Green Alternative, led by the Goldman Prize winner, Manana Kochladze, have filed 26 complaints with the CAO.

During this session, we will share lessons and insights that we have gained through these cases with the international community to encourage improvements in the way public complaints are addressed by the CAO and IFC, and other independent accountability mechanisms and their respective public financial institutions.  The CAO representative will have the opportunity to respond to the points made by each NGO speaker, and to talk more generally about the CAO’s involvement in each project.

Participant List

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1- 110

World Ethics Forum + 5: Are Ethics and Leadership Still the Missing Elements of Governance Reform"

Sponsor:  Institute for Ethics Governance and Law (IEGL), International Institute for Public Ethics

Panelists:  Professor Charles Sampford  (Director, IEGL), Christoph Glaser (Director, International Association for Human Values)

It is five years since the World Bank and the United Nations University sponsored the World Ethics Forum in Oxford with support from USAID, DfID and AusAID.  The meeting recognized that governance reform had concentrated on new laws and institutions but had generally not recognized the importance of ethics and leadership in effective reform. It sought to facilitate a global dialogue on the role of values and leadership in creating and sustaining good governance. 

This workshop will consider the extent to which ethics and leadership are still missing elements in governance reform – especially in the light of the global financial crisis and looming global carbon crisis. It will seek inputs to the themes and goals of the next World Ethics Forum (to be held in Kyoto in 2012) and ways of rebalancing the global dialogue on governance values to reflect Asian inputs.

Participant List

 

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Sunday, September 25

9:00 am – 6:00 pm
IMF HQ2 Building, Room HQ2-01-280 (A&B)

From Rising Inequalities to Shared Societies: The need to Create a Sustainable International Monetary and Financial System

Sponsors:  Center of Concern, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Club de Madrid

Panelists:  Alfred Gusenbauer (Chancellor of Austria (2007-2008) and Member, Club de Madrid); Alejandro Toledo (President of Peru (2001-2006) and Member, Club de Madrid; Min Zhu (Deputy Managing Director, International Monetary Fund); Y. Venugopal Reddy (Governor, Reserve Bank of India (2003-2008)); Sigrid Kaag (Assistant Secretary General and Director of Partnership Bureau, United Nations Development Programme); Chrystia Freeland (Reuters) ; Richard Freeman (Professor of Economics, Harvard University); Josè Antonio Ocampo (Professor, School of International and Public Affairs, Fellow, Committee on Global Thought at Columbia University); Jonathan Coppel (Economic Counsellor to the OECD Secretary General); Rogério Studart (Executive Director to the World Bank); Isabel Ortiz (Associate Director, United Nations Childrens’ Fund (UNICEF)); Jomo Kwame Sundaram (Assistant Secretary General, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations); Ulrich Volz (Senior Economist, German Development Institute); Emmanuel Moulin (Economic Advisor to the President, Office of the President of the Republic of France); Pablo Pereira (Former Executive Director for Argentina to the International Monetary Fund).

Neither national nor international policies adopted in response to recent crises have translated into strong recoveries, and the rebound has been especially weak in the labor markets. In addition, the limited role that public policy has played in addressing chronic and increasing inequality—especially the particular challenges presented by group inequalities, which are fuelled by perceived and real injustice, and often have international dimensions—underscores the urgency of finding ways to correct these ineffective policies. 

The organizers of this high-level conference are therefore deliberately juxtaposing two goals which are seldom linked: reform of the international financial and monetary system and achieving equitable and shared societies. The objective is to contribute to the current debate about the need for a new paradigm for the international financial and monetary system toward producing an agenda for equitable development and social cohesion.

No RSVP required, but accreditation to World Bank/ IMF meetings is necessary. To download a full program visit:

http://www.fes-globalization.org/new_york/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/FES-CdM-Coc-Sept25-Programme_FINAL.pdf

 

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Last updated: 2011-11-30




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