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2012 Spring Meetings - Civil Society Policy Forum

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Civil Society Policy Forum
Washington, DC
April 18 - 21, 2012

The Civil Society Program Policy Forum (CS Forum) was held from Wednesday, April 18 to Saturday, April 21, prior to, and during the 2012 Spring Meetings of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank Group. It was organized by the WBG and IMF Civil Society Teams. The Forum brought together Bank and Fund staff, CSO representatives, government officials, academics, and others to exchange views on a variety of topics ranging from the global economic crisis and climate change, to governance reform.

It also included sessions with Bank President Robert Zoellick, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde and other senior Fund and Bank managers, CSO Roundtable with Executive Directors, and a CSO Welcoming Event.  Several sessions were organized prior to the CS Forum including a capacity-building session on the IMF and an orientation session on the World Bank. 

Please find the schedule of sessions below and check back in the coming days for summary of sessions, participants’ lists, presentations and a gallery of photos from the events. If you have any questions please send us an email (civilsociety@worldbank.org) or call us on 1 202 473 – 1840.

 

Civil Society Program Photo Gallery

Tuesday   Wednesday  Thursday

Friday

Saturday

 

Pre-Civil Society Forum Events
 

Tuesday, April 17

9:00 – 4:00
IMF HQ 1
Events Hall
Room 1-704

Capacity-Building Session on the IMF  /  Orientation Session on the World Bank

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank Group (WBG)

Panelists:  Vasuki Shastry (External Relations Department, IMF), Karla Chaman (Civil Society Team, IMF); Sumir Lal (Operations Communications Department, WB), John Garrison (Civil Society Team, WB), Aaron Rosenberg (Public Affairs Unit, IFC), Rebecca Post (Communications Team, MIGA)

This session focused on the IMF and WBG (IBRD, IFC, MIGA) origins, organizational structure, major policies, and operational work.

Presentations:
1.  Global Issues Facing the IMF 
2.  MIGA 
3.  The World Bank 

 

5:00 – 6:30
IMF HQ 1
Events Hall
Room 1-704

Executive Directors Roundtable with CSOs

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund, World Bank Group

Co-Sponsors: Rogerio Studart (WB Executive Director, Brazil), Merza Hasan (WB Executive Director, MENA Constituency), Meg Lundsager (IMF Executive Director, United States)

This was a roundtable discussion between IMF and WBG Executive Directors with civil society representatives accredited to the Spring Meetings.  The purpose of this event was to promote an exchange of views and discussion on  2012 Spring Meeting policy issues such as jobs, social accountability, and climate change.

Summary

 

CIVIL SOCIETY POLICY FORUM EVENTS 
April 18 - 21

 Wednesday, April 18

8:30 – 9:00
MC C1-100

Welcome Breakfast

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund / World Bank Group

Panelists: Karla Chaman (Head of Civil Society Team, IMF), John Garrison (Head of the WB Civil Society Team)

This was an opportunity for participating CSOs to meet the Fund and Bank Civil Society Team staff, and where the Spring Meetings schedule and logistics were expounded.

 

11:00 - 1:00
MC C1-100

IFI Re-engagement in Burma: Challenges and Opportunities

Sponsors: Bank Information Center (BIC), Human Rights Watch, US Campaign for Burma

Panelists: Sean Turnell (Economics Professor,  Macquarie University),  Paul Sein Twa (Executive Director, Karen Environmental and Social Action Network / KESAN),  Khin Ohmar  (Coordinator, Burma Partnership), Markus Kostner (Sector Leader, WB), Alessandro Pio (Director of the North America Regional Office, Asian Development Bank), Meral Karasulu (Deputy Division Chief, IMF), CHAIR:  Jessica Evans (Senior Advocate for International Financial Institutions, Human Rights Watch)

 In response to the flickers of change that have unfolded in the country, the World Bank and Asian Development Bank have begun the process of re-engaging with Burma’s government for the first time in more than two decades. These banks are now undertaking certain assessments and will provide limited technical assistance. Re-engagement with Burma offers the development banks the unique opportunity to – from the beginning – implement best practices and work toward the best possible development outcomes. However, the current environment in Burma still presents fundamental challenges for development – poor infrastructure, no transparency, endemic corruption, ongoing armed-conflicts and consequent humanitarian crises while rule of law remains far from being realized. Some key questions that were considered include:

 How can we ensure that development initiatives are transparent, community driven, that voices of marginalized communities and non-state actors are heard, and that both the Burmese government and donors are held accountable to the people?
 What principles should guide working in Burma’s ethnic and conflict areas, to ensure that the poor benefit from development projects and harm is avoided?
 What are the complex realities of policy development in Burma, a country shut off from much of the world for two decades, and how can this be navigated?

Participant List

 

11:00 - 12:30
MC C1-200

Consultation on Natural Resources Management and Taxation

Sponsor: International Monetary Fund

Panelists: Dan Ghura (Strategy, Policy, and Review Department, IMF),
Philip Daniel (Fiscal Affairs Department, IMF), Ian Gary (Natural Resource Expert, OXFAM International), Roger Nord (Africa Department, IMF)

Developing countries face important economic policy challenges in trying to realize the full development potential of their natural resources and to avoid the pitfalls that have plagued resource rich countries in the past. To ensure that natural resources provide an opportunity to promote economic and social development, build human capital, and close infrastructure gaps, several economic policy challenges must be addressed. These policy challenges extend to areas such as resource taxation, fiscal policy design, sustainability of external balances, impact of resource booms on exchange rates, and complex linkages between resource and non-resource sectors.

The IMF seeks insights on its work on natural resources related issues, through a consultative process. The process will involve IMF staff interaction with academics, private sector, civil society, amongst others and a public call for written comments on two papers: (i) The Board paper on Natural Resources Wealth Management and (ii) The Board paper on Taxation of Natural Resource Rents. In this session, which is part of the overall public consultation process, the participants provided their views and comments on the work the Fund is undertaking on issues associated to natural resources. 
 
Participant List 

Presentations:

 

11:00 - 12:30
MC C1-110

Lessons from the Global Program Review of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

Sponsor: Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) / WB

Panelists: Elaine Wee-Ling Ooi (Consultant, IEG), Jason Taylor Wright (U.S. Director, International HIV/AIDS Alliance), Owen Ryan (Deputy Director for Public Policy, Foundation for AIDS Research), Chair: Mark Sundberg (Manager, IEG)

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was founded in 2002 to mobilize large-scale donor resources for the specific purpose of reducing infections, illness, and death caused by the three diseases. The Global Fund has since become the largest of the 120 global and regional partnership programs in which the World Bank is currently involved, disbursing more than $3 billion in grants to developing and transition economies in 2010.

A recent IEG report -- Review of Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the World Bank’s Engagement with the Global Fund -- assesses the independence and quality of the Five-Year Evaluation of the Global Fund, validates the major findings of the evaluation, and reviews the extent and nature of the World Bank's engagement with the Global Fund at the global and country levels since the Global Fund was founded.
 
Participant List 


 

11:30 - 12:30
MC Atrium

Close the Gap: Safety Nets Work

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Robert Zoellick (President, WBG), Corazon Juliano-Soliman (Secretary, Department of Social Welfare and Development, Philippines), Michael Elliott (President, ONE), Romulo Paes de Sousa (Vice Minister, Social Development and Fight Against Hunger, Brazil), CHAIR: Tumi Makgabo (Executive Director, Africa Worldwide Media)

This was a part of the broader campaign of Gender Equality by the World Bank and partners.  More... 

 

12:30 – 2:00
MC 1-110

Shutting Off the Spigot on Private Water: How the World Bank Can Support Democratic Water Governance

Sponsor: Corporate Accountability International

Panelists: Shayda Naficy (Corporate Accountability International), Joby Gelbspan (Corporate Accountability International), Nancy Alexander (Heinrich Boell Foundation)

Through financial support, policy recommendations, and other forms of institutional support, the World Bank Group plays a crucial role in global water governance and the realization of the human right to water. However, the shift towards direct private sector investments and use of financial intermediaries is increasingly bypassing governments and democratic processes, and empowering transnational corporations to increase their control over water. Corporate Accountability International will present a new report, and facilitate discussion with experts on why and how the World Bank Group can reverse this trend, harness its resources and reputation to support strong public and community water systems, and focus on building government capacity to responsibly and democratically manage water.

Participant List

Presentation:

 

1:00 – 2:00
MC 1-100

Film Viewing: Making Monkey Business: Building Company/Community Dialogue in the Philippines (Ambuklao & Binga Hydropower Dams)

Sponsors: Compliance Advisor Ombusdam (CAO) / IFC & MIGA

'Making Monkey Business' tells of a dispute resolution process involving communities that were impacted by the building of the Ambuklao and Binga hydropower dams in the Benguet Province of the Philippines. The mediated dialogue was facilitated by the Compliance Advisor Ombudsman (CAO) for IFC/MIGA, and the mediation was conducted by the Conflict Resolution Group in the Philippines. The film conveys the process as experienced by those who participated - the Ibaloi community, company, and government representatives - and is told in their own voices. It demonstrates what was achieved at Ambuklao and Binga through the power of informed dialogue, and showcases a process that companies and communities facing disputes can explore.

This was the first in a series of three films produced by the Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government in collaboration with the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Business and Human Rights, Professor John Ruggie. The films in the series were produced with support from the Government of Norway, CAO, and the International Bar Association.

Participant List


 

12:30 – 2:00
MC C1-200

Road Safety:  How We Can Jointly Support the Decade of Action

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Moira Donahue (Director, International Operations, Safe Kids Worldwide), Nicole Klingen (Sector Manager, Health, Nutrition and Population Team, WB), Nani Rodriguez (President, Gonzalo Rodriguez Foundation, Uruguay), CHAIR: Marc Shotten (Senior Transport Specialist, WB / Global Road Safety Facility)

Road crashes are the leading cause of death worldwide for youth aged 10-24.  Of the 1.3 million killed on the world’s roads each year, 90 percent are in developing countries.   Nearly half of those dying on the world’s roads are “vulnerable road users”:  pedestrians, cyclists, and motorcyclists.  Another 50 million are injured and sometimes permanently disabled, limiting their productive years and quality of life.  This epidemic is an urgent development and public health concern to which the UN responded by launching the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020. In addition, multilateral development banks including the World Bank, have declared road safety a priority investment area for their client countries.  

Civil society organizations have an important advocacy and operational role to play in supporting the Decade, as shown by the recent creation of a global alliance of road safety NGOs.  This dialogue with CSOs convened by Safe Kids Worldwide and the World Bank’s Global Road Safety Facility (GRSF) will update participants on civil society engagement with road safety and explore how CSOs can get involved.

Click here to watch the webcast archived file for this session.

Participant List

Presentations:

 

1:00 - 5:00
Room: TBC

Training Session on WB Open Development Instruments

Sponsors: World Bank

Panelists: John Garrison (Civil Society Team/WB), Vera Wen (Development Economics/WB),  Samuel S. Lee (Controller’s Unit/WB), Bjorn-Soren Gigler (World Bank Institute), Leena Chaukulkar (Operations Policy and Country Services/WB), CHAIR: Hannah George (External Affairs/WB) 

This in-depth learning event addressed how the World Bank’s Open Development initiative – part of the World Bank’s modernization and reforms – is fostering the World Bank’s commitment to transparency, accountability, and results. Through this session, CSOs, citizens, and local stakeholders  learnt how to access World Bank data on lending projects, analytical and advisory services, poverty trends, development knowledge, including project results and financing.  The session featured guided demos and interactive presentations. 

Summary

 

2:00 - 3:30
MC C1-200

The Inspection Panel - An Update from Recent Cases on Issues of Consultation and Community Participation

Sponsor:  Inspection Panel / WB

Panelists: Alf Jerve (Inspection Panel Chair), Maninder Gil (Sector Manager, WB), Leonardo Crippa (Staff Attorney, Indian Law Resource Center), CHAIR: Peter Lallas (Executive Secretary of the Inspection Panel)

The session presented for review key findings from recent Inspection Panel cases on the topics of consultation and community participation in Bank-supported projects, including in projects affecting indigenous peoples and involving involuntary resettlement. Bank operational policies require consultation with and involvement of affected communities in planning and implementation. Panel cases illustrate that affected communities and Bank staff may have rather different views on what is required. This session reflected on the challenges of determining what compliance with Bank policies entails on these topics.   
  

Participant List


 

2:00 - 3:30
MC C1-100

Parliamentary Monitoring Organizations: Working to Enhance Parliamentary Performance?

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Guillermo Avila (Transparency and Accountability Researcher, FUNDAR Mexico), Jeffrey Thindwa (Lead Social Development Specialist, WB), Geoffrey Ekanya (Parliamentarian, Parliament of Uganda), CHAIR: Mitchell O’Brien (Governance Specialist, WB)

The World Bank Group’s Governance and Anti-Corruption policy underscores the importance of multi-stakeholder approaches to tackling the challenges of poor governance and improving development outcomes. Collaborative governance draws from the experiences, expertise, and insights of diverse stakeholder groups and permits the social monitoring of public institutions so that they are more responsive and accountable to citizens. CSOs represent a key stakeholder. They are engaged at all levels to promote good governance and improve development outcomes—from policy advocacy to independent budget analysis, public expenditure tracking, and monitoring of service delivery. CSOs also work to influence parliament and strengthen its oversight role.

This session explored a particularly important type of CSO in this respect - parliamentary monitoring organizations (PMOs). PMOs’ work, which includes assessing the functioning of parliaments, informing citizens, and promoting public participation in parliamentary processes, can be key to strengthening parliamentary capacity.  The session included social accountability perspectives from both parliament and PMOs. 
 

Participant List

 

2:00 - 3:30
MC C1-110

Climate Change, Energy Access and Sustainable Development: Interlinked Challenges in the BASIC South

Sponsor: BASIC South Initiative

Panelists: Dr. Renosi Mokate (Executive Director at the World Bank for South Africa, Angola and Nigeria), Joanna Lewis (Georgetown University), Alexander Wang (Visiting Scholar  at American University), Adhemar Mineiro (Trade Union Confederation of the Americas, Brazil), Charlie Heaps  (Director of Stockholm Environment Institute, US) 

Developing and emerging economies face a two-fold energy challenge in the 21st century: Meeting the needs of billions of people who still lack access to basic, modern energy services while simultaneously participating in a global transition to clean, low-carbon energy systems. Both aspects of this challenge demand urgent attention. The first, because access to reliable, affordable, and socially acceptable energy services is a pre-requisite to alleviating extreme poverty and meeting other development goals. The second, because emissions from developing countries are growing rapidly and their contribution to environmental problems, such as climate change and poor air quality is increasing. These problems put the health and prosperity of people around the world—but especially the poor in these developing and emerging economies—at grave risk.

The session explored some possibilities of achieving sustainable energy access in climate constrained world.

Participant List

Prensentations:

 

4:00 - 5:30
MC C1-200

Advocating Policies with the IFIs: Opportunities, Constraints, and Lessons Learned

Sponsor: International Monetary Fund, World Bank

PanelistsKatsuji Imata (Acting Secretary General, CIVICUS), Mark Rentschler (Director of Campaigns, Bank Information Center), Karla Chaman (Head of Civil Society Team, IMF), CHAIR: John Garrison (Head of the WB Civil Society Team)

This session explored the evolving nature of civil society advocacy efforts on the IMF and WB, and what impact they have had.  Panelists will discuss characteristics of different advocacy strategies and approaches, what works and what doesn’t, and lessons learned over the years.  Panelists will provide perspectives from Washington and developing country-based CSOs, as well as from the IMF and WB. 

Participant List 

Summary

 

4:00 - 5:30
MC C1-110

In Africa, Targeting the Media on the Road to Development

Sponsor: Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ)

Panelists: Mohamed Keita (Africa Advocacy Program Coordinator, CPJ), Almami I. Cyllah (Africa Regional Director, International Foundation for Electoral Systems), Mark Nelson (WB), CHAIR: Phil Hay (WB)

How vital is press freedom for development? With African growth rates surpassing that of East Asia over the past decade, how will a more prosperous Africa meet the demands of citizens and investors for information and probing reporting?  Indeed, rather than recognizing a free press as essential for economic development, critical reporting by African media is portrayed by some governments as detrimental, with the watchdog role of a probing press equated to that of a national traitor who creates a negative image for foreign aid and investment. Repression is happening in the form of imprisonments, amendments to laws, physical intimidation and murder.

With more than 330 journalists forced into exile over the past decade, CPJ research shows, sub-Saharan Africa is accountable for half of all journalists driven out of their homelands worldwide. How can the more repressive parts of the continent learn from those countries that have begun to make room for a free and open press? With a starting point in the current situation for the free press on the continent, this session discussed the tensions between some African countries and probing reporting. Looking forward, the session answered the question of how probing reporting can benefit development and what we can do collectively to support and preserve it.
 

Participant List

Presentation:

 

4:00 - 5:30
MC C1-100

Business Models for Financing Access to Sustainable Energy in Developing Countries

Sponsor: World Resources Institute

Panelists: Sarah Alexander (Selco, India), Nicola Armacost (ArcFinance), Mahadevan (Mack) Ramachandran (Offset4Poor), Koffi Ekouevi (World Bank), Lâl Marandin (blueEnergy), CHAIR: Athena Ballesteros (World Resources Institute)

According to the IEA, 1.3 billion people lack access to electricity and 2.7 billion people rely on traditional biomass for cooking. The vast majority of energy poverty occurs in Sub-Saharan Africa and developing Asia and is overwhelmingly a rural problem. These deprivations stunt economic opportunities, and impose costs in health, gender, education and convenience. 

The constraints of mitigating climate change while expanding access to modern energy present a challenge for large international initiatives, including the new UN Secretary General’s Sustainable Energy for All Initiative and Norway’s Energy+ Partnership. Practitioners in developing countries throughout the world have pioneered innovative business models and sector capacity building programs that are successfully delivering sustainable modern energy services to consumers that had previously been beyond the reach of traditional service providers. 

In order to build on this knowledge, WRI recently convened a workshop to gather developing country, community-oriented, sustainable energy service providers and solicit insights on how to scale up delivery of sustainable modern energy to underserved communities. This panel provided an opportunity to share the lessons and perspectives that emerged, and inform the design of international energy access initiatives.

Participant List

Presentations:

 

4:30 – 5:30
MC – Preston Auditorium

Jobs or Growth: Which Comes First?

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Robert B. Zoellick (President, WBG), Kaushik Basu (Chief Economic Adviser to the Government of India), Houssine Dimassi (Minister of Finance, Tunisia), Paul Romer (Professor of Economics, New York University), CHAIR: Tumi Makgabo (Global Media Anchor)

Today 910 million people at work across the globe live in poverty.  To cope with the growth of the working age population, more than 300 million jobs will be needed in South Asia, the Middle East and Africa in the coming decades. Jobs are critically important for development, however, there is a debate about when a growth strategy is enough, and when a jobs strategy is needed.

As part of the World Bank’s 2012 Spring Meetings, this session had an engaging discussion on the relationship between growth strategies and jobs.


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Thursday, April 19

8:30 - 10:00
MC C1-100

Post-WDR Discussion on Gender at the World Bank

Sponsors: Bank Information Center, World Bank

Panelists: Jeni Klugman (Director of Gender and Development, World Bank), Liane Schalatek  (Associate Director, Heinrich Boell Foundation), Laila Iskandar (Managing Director, Community and Institutional Development Group, Egypt), CHAIR: Ian Solomon  (World Bank Executive Director)

Panelists discussed progress since the WDR on Gender Equality was launched last fall. They examined gaps and gains, and discussed the regional action workplans and companion pieces to the WDR.
 
Participant List

Presentations:

 

9:00 - 10:30
MC C1-200

The Chad-Cameroon Oil & Pipeline Project: Impacts on Affected People and the Need for Alternative Compensation Models

Sponsors: Urgewald, Misereor and Diakonie (Germany)

Panelists: Bishop Kouraleyo Tarounga (Diocese of Doha), Djeralar Miankeol  (Chadian NGO Network), J.C. Brou (World Bank), Diana Baird (IFC), Clive Armstrong (IFC), CHAIR: David Hunter (American University).

When the World Bank approved financing for this project in June 2000, it described the oil project as a model for private-public partnership and an unprecedented framework to transform oil wealth into direct benefits for the poor.  IDA/IBRD received full repayment of their loans and pulled out of the project in 2008, citing the Chadian government’s violations of agreements underpinning the project. IFC remains engaged in the project to date.  A 2009 evaluation by the Bank’s Independent Evaluation Group found that the project is associated with deepening poverty, deteriorating governance and violent conflict.

Bishop Joachim Kouraleyo of Moundou in the heart of Chad’s oil-producing region and agronomist Djéralar Miankéol will speak about the impact of the project on local communities, especially the destruction of rural production systems, and the need of fair compensation for those affected.  Through dialogue with World Bank and IFC staff, this session explored how the World Bank Group can contribute to addressing the serious grievances faced by local populations and make good on its commitment that all oil passing through the Chad-Cameroon oil pipeline would have to adhere to World Bank standards.
 
Participant List 

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-100

Consultation on Debt Limits for Low Income Countries

Sponsor: International Monetary Fund

Panelists: Laurence Allain (Strategy, Policy, and Review Department, IMF), CHAIR: Karla Chaman (Head of Civil Society Team, IMF)

With two years having passed since the introduction of the new policy on external debt limits in IMF-supported programs in 2009, the IMF is undertaking a review of the framework to take stock of experiences to date and identify areas where further improvements could be considered. This review also provides an excellent opportunity to assess whether the policy continues to strike the appropriate balance between addressing fundamental development needs in low-income countries and maintaining debt sustainability.

In the context of this review, the IMF is engaging in a broad consultative process to seek feedback from country authorities, development partners, and members of civil society. In this session the CSO had the opportunity to present their views regarding how helpful the policy has been in preserving debt sustainability and how to improve the current policy.
 

Participant List 

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1 -200

Access to Information Policy and Beyond - Update on the World Bank's Open Agenda

Sponsors: World Bank, Bank Information Center (BIC)

Panelists: Lisa Lui (Lead Counsel, LEGIP / WB), Amy Ekdawi (Manager, Middle East and North Africa Program, BIC), Matthew Howells (Publishing Officer, EXTOP / WB), CHAIR: Sumir Lal (Manager, External Affairs /WB)


As part of its modernization and open agenda, the World Bank is committed to greater openness about its data and knowledge, operations and partnerships.  Since 2010, the World Bank has made significant strides in positioning itself as a transparent, accessible, and accountable institution through the launch of its Access to Information (AI) Policy, Open Data and other tools and initiatives - all encompassing the Open Development paradigm.

Proactive engagement with civil society and other key stakeholders remain critical to the success of the Open Development agenda at the country level.  The session addressed how the various Open Development initiatives are fostering the World Bank’s commitment to transparency, accountability, and results and also provided an opportunity for a candid and constructive discussion on the opportunities, challenges and lessons learned.

Participant List 

Presentations:

Summary 

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-110

Enhancing Social Accountability in Resource-Rich Developing Countries: Nigeria Case Study

Sponsors: Cordaid

Panelists: Elly Rijnierse (Cordaid), Fr. Edward Obi (Gas Alert for Sustainable Initiative / GASIN),  Susan Bassey (Niger Delta Women’s Movement  / NDWM), Naomi Akpan Ita (African Women’s Active Non-violence Initiatives for Social Change / AWANICh), Chudi Okafor and Caroline Sage (World Bank)

Like many resource-rich developing countries, Nigeria faces specific challenges with regards to social accountability in its management of oil and gas resources. Despite recent progress, significant gaps remain in the dialogue between policy makers and the communities in the Niger Delta.  With youth and women directly impacted by oil exploitation, the lack of social engagement and accountability are seen as significant risk factors for social unrest and conflict re-emergence.  As donor agencies endeavor to support governance reform in the Delta, and given the limited dialogue to date on social accountability, an understanding of both the challenges community-based CSOs face and opportunities for engageament is imperative.

This session discussed the emergence of local groups that have developed effective advocacy approaches to promoting dialogue, social accountability and women-led peace building.  These CSOs also have learned to coordinate effectively with international CSOs as well as engaging governments and oil companies.  The session also intends to contribute to the discussion surrounding the World Bank’s proposed Global Partnership for Social Accountability, which focuses on opening up space for civil society to enhance accountability and to foster good governance in developing countries.

Participant List

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C2-131

Executive Colloquium on Investment, Infrastructure, and Integrity: Public and Private Perspectives

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Sri Mulyani Indrawati (Managing Director, WB), Cesar V. Purisma (Secretary of Finance, Philippines), Karan Bhatia (Vice President and Senior Counsel, Global Government Affairs and Policy, General Electric), Peter Solmssen (Member of the Managing Board and General Counsel, Siemens AG), Julio Rojas (CEO for the Americas, Standard Chartered Bank), Mahmoud Mohieldin (Managing Director, World Bank). 

This colloquium provides an opportunity for key partners to identify concrete actions that will help promote clean business in large-scale infrastructure investments. Specifically, we aim to address how integrity issues and corrupt environments impact investment decisions and risk management, from both the public and private sector perspectives; what steps firms, financial institutions, and governments can take to strengthen anti-corruption efforts in infrastructure investments; and how international institutions, such as the World Bank Group, can help all parties further good governance and reduce integrity risks, while promoting investment in the infrastructure sector.


2:00 - 3:30
MC C1-200

Agriculture and Food Security

Sponsors:  Greenpeace International, Oxfam International, Bank Information Center

Panelists: Sasanka Thilakasiri  (Policy Advisor, IFI Economic Justice, Oxfam International), Neil Watkins (Head of Policy and Campaigns, ActionAid America), Julian Oram (Senior Political Advisor,  Greenpeace International), Christopher Delgado (Food Security Advisor, World Bank), and Mark Constantine (Principal Strategy Officer, IFC), CHAIR: Asma Lateef(Director,  Bread for the World Institute).

Following a long period of declining public investment in agriculture, recent years has seen a renewed political commitment to increasing international financing into the sector. With food security concerns high on the global political agenda, vital questions are currently being asked about the role of international financial institutions in helping to meet the needs of small-scale farmers, and contribute to more economically, socially and ecologically sustainable agricultural systems.  International Financial Institutions (IFIs) play a major role in supporting investments in agricultural research, technology and infrastructure, with WB Group alone financing an estimated $4 billion in agricultural sector projects this year.

This session evaluated the role of IFIs and multi-donor financing platforms in addressing the challenges faced by world agriculture. Speakers will briefly explore recent experiences of the WB, IFC, and multi-donor investments in the agriculture sector, and evaluate how these have responded to the needs of the 500 million small-scale food producers who feed 70 percent of the world's population.  Panelists also gave their views on how future IFI financing (eg. the World Bank Group's Agriculture Action Plan and the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program) could better meet the needs of small farmers, particularly women, while protecting the natural resource base upon which agriculture and food security ultimately depends.

Participant List

Presentations:

 

2:00 – 3:30
MC C1-110

Transitioning to Transparency: Advancing Financial Integrity in the Middle East and North Africa

Sponsor: Task Force on Financial Integrity & Economic Development

Panelists: Raymond Baker (Director, Task Force on Financial Integrity & Economic Development), Jean Pesme (Manager, StAR Initiative, WB), CHAIR: Christine Clough (Coordinator, Task Force on Financial Integrity & Economic Development)

Fiscal accountability is a key component of a well-functioning social contract, both of which have been absent in many countries in the MENA region, including Libya, Tunisia, Egypt and Syria. According to a report by Task Force member Global Financial Integrity, MENA countries have the highest average annual illicit outflows of any region: $146 billion. Establishing transparent financial systems helps secure democracy and avoids a return to authoritarian rule.

The panelists debated the role illicit financial flows have played in the MENA region, particularly with regards to low levels of financial and political transparency. The panelists also discussed how addressing such opacity could contribute to the ongoing political transitions in many countries in the region, paying particular attention to the roles that civil society organizations and international institutions (World Bank, IMF, etc.) can play to help guide these transitions towards constructive and sustainable outcomes. The audience will also be invited and encouraged to join the debate by sharing their perspective on the issue and posing questions to the panelists.

Participant List

Presentation:

 

2:00 – 3:30
MC C1-100

The Eurozone Recession: Are There Alternatives?

Sponsor: Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Panelists: Mark Weisbrot (Co-Director of the CEPR), Mahmood Pradhan (Deputy Director of the European Department, IMF), CHAIR: Deborah James (CEPR)

This panel focused on the role of debt, fiscal policy, and the European Central Bank in the current European recession. Is the worst over?  Are the economies of the Eurozone being held back by the need for structural reform or by macroeconomic policies?  Could the European Central Bank play a role more like the Federal Reserve in the United States, and would this help to resolve the crisis?  

Participant List

 

2:30 – 4:30
JB1-080
(701 18th St.)

Catalyzing Change for Results in Africa – the Role of Capacity Development

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Sanjay Pradhan (Vice President, World Bank Institute), Frannie Léautier (Executive Secretary, African Capacity Building Foundation), John Rwangombwa (Minister of Finance and Economic Planning, Republic of Rwanda), H.E. Kerfalla Yansane (Minister of Economy and Finance, Republic of Guinea), Bineta Diop (Executive Director, Femmes Africa Solidarité), Engwase Mwale (Executive Director, NGO Coordinating Council, Zambia), CHAIR: Shantayanan Devarajan (Chief Economist, Africa Region, WB)

Sub-Saharan Africa has an unprecedented opportunity for transformation and sustained growth. Its economic growth has averaged 5 percent a year for a decade. Africa’s private sector is increasingly attracting investment, and the climate for market-oriented, pro-poor reforms is proving robust.  Despite these gains, there is a need to intensify change. Capacity development is an essential ingredient for Africa's development goals. However, traditional approaches to capacity development are not sufficient to support change. There is a need to re-think how capacity development is practiced and to build concrete evidence on what works to achieve results in countries.

This forum brought together high-profile leaders from regional institutions in Africa, country ministers, non-state organizations, and the World Bank to share lessons, challenges, and  explore critical new directions on capacity development. The forum debated difficult questions around strengthening public sector capacity on the supply side, versus multi-stakeholder capacity in the sociopolitical environment. What mix of approaches can support the types of transformations needed in Africa?

The debate informed a follow-up agenda for systematic learning with partners in Africa and the World Bank on  ways to improve capacity development so it is a robust and measurable part of how countries achieve their development goals. For example, working on distilling and sharing lessons from what is already known, experimenting with new innovations to improve the implementation of capacity development, and gathering new knowledge and information on capacity development practice and results.


3:00 – 4:30
I 2-220
(1850 I St.)

Breaking Down Barriers: A New Dawn in Trade and Regional Cooperation in South Asia

Sponsors: World Bank

Panelists: Isabel Guerrero (Vice President, South Asia Region, WB), Ambassador Teresita Schaffer (Director, South Asia Program, Center of Strategic and International Studies), Gowher Rizvi (Director, Ash Institute for Democratic Governance and Innovation), Kanak Dixit (Editor, Himal South Asian), David Thompson (CEO, Rapids Wireless), Shuja Nawaz (Director, South Asia Center, The Atlantic Council), Kalpana Kochhar (World Bank Chief Economist, South Asia)

South Asia is one of the least integrated regions in the world. Regional trade can potentially benefit the most lagging regions of South Asia. For the region to be a part of the "Asian Century" the vision of South Asia integration and cooperation needs to be embraced by governments and citizens alike.

 

3:30 – 5:00
MC C1-100

Time for a New Consensus: Regulating Financial Flows
for Stability and Development

Sponsors: Bretton Woods Project, Latindadd

Panelists: Peter Chowla (Coordinator, Bretton Woods Project), Maria Jose Romero (Policy and Advocacy Officer, Latindadd), Kevin Gallagher (Associate Professor, Boston University)

In the wake of the financial collapse of 2008, the role of cross-border capital flows, which can have both good and potentially devastating consequences, is again being questioned. The countries that fared the worst in the crisis were those with the most deregulated and liberalised policies towards capital inflows. Three new reports set the stage for new thinking on regulating financial flows across borders, looking towards pragmatic responses that enable developing countries to have policies for growth without facing the risks and instability that these financial flows can generate.

Participant List

Presentations:

 

3:30 – 5:00
MC C1-200

Youth Unemployment:  Causes and Responses 

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Dena Ringold (Senior Economist, World Development Report 2013 Team), David Robalino (Labor Markets Team Leader, WB),  Anushka Wijesinha (Research Economist,  Institute of Policy Studies, Sri Lanka), Peter Shiras (Vice President, International Youth Foundation).

The global financial crisis resulted in massive job losses for youth in both emerging and industrial countries. The Arab uprisings highlighted the discontent of educated youth whose job opportunities fall short of their expectations. Around the world, there is anxiety about the pace of job creation and the prospect of a global fight for jobs.

Join team members from the World Bank’s 2013 World Development Report (WDR) and the new Jobs Knowledge Platform (JKP), along with youth leaders from South Asia, for a presentation and discussion of some of the preliminary research findings on the causes and ways to address youth employment.  This will be followed by an introduction to the tools the JKP is developing to help find solutions to create more and better jobs.

Participant List

 

3:30 – 5:00
MC C1-110

Setting the Standards for Loans to Post-Revolution Egypt

Sponsors: Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR), Oxfam International

Panelists: Hossam Bahgat (Founder and Director of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights – EIPR),  Amy Ekdawi (MENA Program Manager, Bank Information Center), Mohga Kamal-Yanni (Oxfam International), David Craig (Egypt Country Director, World Bank)

Given the unpredictable political situation in post-revolution Egypt and the broad mistrust of both those in government as well as international donor agencies lending to this interim government, it is critical to ensure that the citizens of Egypt – those who will be responsible for paying back these loans - are participating in the decision making processes surrounding these loans, starting with the negotiation processes.

Participant List

 

4:00  – 5:30
MC 4-800

Opening Doors: Gender Equality In the Middle East and North Africa

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Tara Vishwanath (Lead Economist, MENA Region, WB),  Ramzia Aleyrani (Chairwoman, Yemeni Women’s Council), Merza Hussain Hasan (World Bank Executive Director, MENA Constituency), CHAIR: Inger Andersen (Vice President, Middle East and North Africa Region, WB)

Countries in the Middle East and North Africa region have made truly commendable progress in bridging gender gaps in health and education. However, challenges remain for women - despite aspirations to work, women, especially young women find it difficult to find jobs or run their own businesses. Similarly, women's participation in political and civic life remains limited.

This session held an open discussion and presentation of the findings of a draft report: "Opening Doors: Gender Equality in the Middle East and North Africa".  Faced with a multitude of factors that constrain women's economic empowerment, this report, a companion to the World Development Report 2012, highlights the urgency for change and identifies opportunities for policy action.  A distinguished panel of experts from the region joined the discussion and shared their insights and experiences.


5:30 – 7:00
MC - Preston Auditorium

Supporting Social Accountability for Better Results

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists: Corazon Juliano-Soliman (Secretary, Department of Social Welfare and Development, Philippines), Sam Worthington (CEO, InterAction), Laila Iskandar (Managing Director, Community and Institutional Development Group, Egypt), Maya Harris (Vice President, Ford Foundation), CHAIR: Caroline Anstey (Managing Director, WB).  Concluding Remarks: Robert Zoellick (President, WBG).

A year ago citizen movements from across the globe demonstrated powerfully that citizens want accountability from their governments. Greater access to modern information technology such as mobile phones and social media is also multiplying opportunities for citizens to provide feedback on government performance.  The World Bank understands now more than ever that greater civic engagement and voice is crucial for development results.
In his Peterson Institute speech on April 6, 2011, Robert Zoellick spoke of the need for a new social contract to "democratize development".  He noted that social accountability efforts can improve domestic accountability and constructive engagement between citizens and their governments, leading to improved development effectiveness. 

Whether through CheckMySchool.org, program in the Philippines to support citizen oversight of the education sector, use of community scorecards to reduce child mortality in Uganda, or municipal governments disclosing budgets in the DRC, public scrutiny and monitoring of government services is increasing.  A crucial question, however, is how to support to civil society and governments in sustaining these efforts moving forward.  This session explored these and other questions around the emerging social accountability agenda.

Watch the archived webcast file here.  And read the summary of session here. 

 

7:00  - 8:30
MC - 12 Floor Gallery

Civil Society Welcoming Event

Sponsors: World Bank, International Monetary Fund

Co-hosted by External Affairs (WB) and External Relations (IMF) Departments, and remarks by Caroline Anstey (Managing Director, WB) and Nemat Shafik (Deputy Managing Director, IMF).  It was a successful mingling of CSOs and Bank and IMF staff, that saw over 200 CSOs participating.
   

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Friday, April 20

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-100

Transformational Partnerships to Strengthen Food Security

Sponsors: German Marshall Fund, Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa

Panelists: Felix Mosha (Chairman, Confederation of Tanzanian Industries, and Member of the Board, Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor of Tanzania / SAGCOT), John Barrett (Chief Professional Officer for Climate, Environment, Infrastructure and Livelihoods, UK Department for International Development  / DFID), Michele McNabb (President, Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa), CHAIR:  Jim Kunder, Senior Transatlantic Fellow, German Marshall Fund of the United States.

Over the past decade, six of the world’s ten fastest growing economies were African.  At the same time, events in the Sahel region and the Horn of Africa have plunged millions into food and nutritional insecurity, increasing poverty, social unrest, and political instability. Economic growth is necessary but not sufficient to address this cross-cutting food security challenge. In response, the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF) launched “Transformational Partnerships in Food Security in Africa: A Transatlantic Experts Group” made up of over 40 transatlantic experts in food security and agricultural development.

The group was started in order to harness the renewed transatlantic and global focus on food security and channel that energy into improved development practices, and particularly more effective partnerships, including among public and private sector actors. The Experts Group’s final report is being released in April 2012, featuring policy recommendations on how to catalyze transformation, ways to approach difficult policy changes, support strategies for particular sectors and issues, and tactics for bringing partners together under a shared vision.

Members of the Experts Group and African stakeholders discussed these policy recommendations and some of the lessons learned to inform future policymaking. Key questions addressed include:  What needs to happen to make inclusive food security partnerships more commonplace and effective?; What are some bright spots in terms of donor-donor, public-private, or government-civil society cooperation in African food security?; and What can transatlantic policymakers do to promote more successes going forward?

Participant List

Presentation:

 

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-200

Kosovo's Options for a Sustainable Energy Future

Sponsors: Sierra Club, Institute for Development Policy (INDEP)

Panelists: Bruce Buckheit (Former Officer, Environmental Protection Agency, US), Jonathan Buonocore (School of Public Health, Harvard University), Steve Herz (Sierra Club), CHAIR: Barbara Gottlieb (Director, Environment & Health Physicians for Social Responsibility).

There was a presentation and discussion on Kosovo's options to develop a sustainable energy future. The debate focused around the involvement of the World Bank in developing this sector in the country. Kosovo CSOs oppose the plan to build a new lignite power plant in Kosovo and want the World Bank to change Kosovo's energy path by shifting the planned investment in lignite into investing in renewable energy, energy efficiency, better demand-side management, retrofitting and regional cooperation.

Participant List

Presentation:

 

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-110

Inclusive Development and Disability: Lessons Learnt and Challenges to Overcome

Sponsors: International Disability Alliance, the Lebanese Physical Handicapped Union (LPHU), Human Rights Watch (HRW)

Panelists: Mohammed Ali Loutfy (Senior Advisor, LPHU), Diane Richler (Chair, International Disability Alliance), Medi Ssengooba (Co-founder of Legal Action for Persons with Disabilities (LAPD), Uganda), Aleksandra Posarac (Team Leader, Disability & Development, World Bank)

This panel session brought a distinguished array of expertise on issues of inclusive development and disability rights. Questions considered include:

• What mechanisms work to ensure inclusive development and disability mainstreaming?
• What are the key challenges for international financial institutions to overcome in working to make development more inclusive of people with disabilities, be they physical or mental?
• What socio-economic and cultural outcomes should development workers consider to ensure that projects are inclusive and respect the rights of people with disabilities?

Participant List

 

10:00 – 11:00
U 12-400
(1800 G Street)

MIGA Open House for CSOs

Sponsor: Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA)

This session provided an opportunity for CSO representatives to meet with MIGA staff to learn more about MIGA and to discuss any issues of concern.  Any questions may be directed to Cara Santos Pianesi at csantospianesi@worldbank.org.

 

11:00 - 12:30
MC C1-100

Fulfilling the Promise of Busan:  Moving from Principles to Impact

Sponsor: Oxfam

Panelists: Brian Atwood (Chair, Development Assistance Committee, OECD), Barbara Lee (Manager, Aid Effectiveness Unit, World Bank), Lidia Fromm Cea (Director General for Cooperation, Ministry of Planning and Cooperation, Honduras), Katsuji Imata (Acting Secretary General of CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation), Gerardo Bracho (Deputy Director General of Mexican Agency for Development Cooperation), 
CHAIR: Gregory Adams (Director of Aid Effectiveness, Oxfam America).

The Busan High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness (HLF4) forged a new a global partnership amongst high-level political leaders of donor governments, emerging economies, aid recipients, the private sector, and civil society.  Whereas previous forums in Paris and Accra were more donor-driven and technically focused, the wide array of Busan stakeholders recognized that effective development means that politics matter and requires a robust monitoring framework to drive political change.  With the global monitoring framework and future architecture to be agreed upon in June, this session will explore how the development community can ensure that the groundwork laid in Busan will lead to better development impact. 

The following questions were discussed by the panelists:  How can we ensure the political change necessary to meet the policy commitments?  How will different countries operationalize “shared principles, common goals and differential commitments” for effective development and ensure everyone is working from the same page?   How can we ensure that development effectiveness is also about fulfilling rights and addressing political aspects as much as it is about technical aspects?

Read here related blog post on why keeping score of donor promises is important for driving political change and how best to measure those commitments.  

Participant List

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-200

Jobs and Inclusive Growth: Goals, Gaps, Game Plan

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund

Panelists: Prakash Loungani  (Advisor, IMF Co-Chair, IMF Working Group on Jobs and Inclusive Growth), Ilir Ciko (Lecturer of International Trade Policy and Business Ethics, University of New York Tirana, Albania), Ahmed Ghoneim (Professor of Economics, Cairo University, Egypt), Elizabeth Stuart (Head of the Washington DC Office, Oxfam), CHAIR: Karla Chaman (Head of Civil Society Team, IMF)

Developments around the globe have brought concerns about job creation, growth and inequality to the fore. A working group set up by IMF management has proposed (i) enhanced coverage of labor market issues in Fund work; (ii) a re-assessment of the impact of policies, including labor market policies, on employment and growth; and (iii) a focus on fostering growth. The co-chair of the working group will give a preview of projects underway and preliminary findings, followed by a discussion with civil society representatives and academics.

Participant List

Presentation:

 

11:00 – 1:00
J 1-050
(701 18th St)

New Frontiers on Women's Empowerment and Voice: Views from Around the World

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Otaviano Canuto (Vice President and Head of Network, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management, WB), Nisha Agrawal (CEO, Oxfam India), Ramzia Aleryani  (Chairwoman, Yemen Women's Union, Yemen), Elizabeth Broderick (Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Australia), Alison Evans (Director, Overseas Development Institute), Jeni Klugman (Director, Gender and Development, WB), Betty Mwangi-Thuo (Chief of Financial Services, Safaricom, Kenya)

Women and girls have made impressive gains in education, life expectancy and, in some instances, labor force participation. But as the 2012 World Development Report on Gender Equality and Development shows, this progress has not automatically led to improved rights and voice: Women in almost all countries of the world continue to trail men on measurements such as household decision making and legal parity. And gender-based violence, both in households and in conflict arenas, continues to be alarmingly prevalent in a large number of societies.

This is simply not right. Women should be entitled to equal protection under the law and be able to participate in decision-making at the local and national levels; and at home, they should not bear the threat of violence simply because they are women. What’s more, experience shows that progress in women's voice and rights benefits everyone, not just women and girls.

Distinguished panel of experts from the World Bank's Advisory Council on Gender and Development discussed and shared examples of the work being done to improve women's voice and agency.


12:45 – 2:00
MC C1-100

Launch of Global Monitoring Report 2012:  Food Prices, Nutrition, and the Millennium Development Goals

Sponsors: World Bank, IMF, Save the Children, Oxfam

Panelists: Jos Verbeek (Lead Author, Global Monitoring Report, World Bank), Brad McDonald  (Deputy Chief, Low-Income Country Strategy Unit, IMF), Nuria Molina (Director, Policy and Research, Save the Children UK), Sasanka Thilakasiri (Policy Advisor, IFI Economic Justice, Oxfam International), Lynge Nielsen  (Lead Author, Global Monitoring Report, International Monetary Fund), CHAIR: Lindsay Coates (Vice President for Policy, InterAction)

Every year, the Global Monitoring Report (GMR), a joint World Bank-IMF publication, gauges progress across the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), to better understand how the world is doing on delivering basic human needs to the poor.  The recent spikes and continuing volatility in international food prices prompted the theme of this year’s GMR: ‘Food Prices, Nutrition, and the Millennium Development Goals’.

Among the questions the report explores and provides answers to are: What has been the impact of yet another food price spike on developing countries’ ability to make progress toward the MDGs? How many poor people were prevented from escaping poverty and hunger? How many people, and how many children, saw their personal growth and development permanently harmed because their families could not afford to buy food? How did countries react to the last two food price spikes of 2007/08 and 2011 and what can they do to respond to higher and more volatile food prices?  The report also details progress on each MDG in the developing world. With just three short years to go before the 2015 deadline to achieve the MDGs, GMR 2012 finds a mixed picture – some MDGs have already been achieved while others will not be met.

During this session, report’s lead authors presented key findings and two CSO discussants provided comments before a plenary discussion on the nexus between food security and the MDGs.

Presentation:

 

12:30 – 2:00
MC C1-200

Slipping Through the Cracks: The Boundaries of Care between Public and Private Sectors when Community Health is at Stake 

Sponsors: Compliance Advisor Ombudsman (CAO) / IFC &MIGA, Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL)

Panelists: María Eugenia Bonilla Chacín (Senior Economist, Health, Nutrition and Population, World Bank), Kristen Genovese (Senior Attorney, Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL)), Michael McClean (Associate Professor, Boston University School of Public Health), Fares Zaki (Senior Manager, Manufacturing, Agribusiness & Services, IFC), Chair: David Atkins (Environmental Engineer and Technical Advisor to CAO).

What happens when communities’ concerns falls through the cracks and is caught in the grey area between public and private sector responsibilities? How can the World Bank Group, through its different agencies, help bridge such gaps in projects where they have a role? What models of collaboration can help address these types of structural weaknesses and empower affected communities? How can science and technical data be used to help define roles among different actors and build collaboration spaces?

This session used as its basis an ongoing CAO case in Nicaragua where the parties are working to address a critical public health issue impacting communities.


Participant List

Presentation:

 

2:30 – 4:00
MC C1-110

Dispute Prevention and Resolution in World Bank Projects

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Amar Inamdar (Program Manager, Risk Management Unit, OPCS/World Bank), Marie Brown (Program Officer, Risk Management Unit, OPCS/World Bank), Juan Dumas (consultant), Kris Genovese (Senior Attorney, Center for International Environmental Law), Chair: David Hunter (Professor of Law, American University).
  

Effectively addressing grievances from affected people is essential for improving development outcomes.  Come find out how the World Bank is supporting improved dispute prevention and resolution on the ground. Using a collaborative approach that focuses on supporting World Bank staff and client teams, World Bank management is developing tools and resources to better predict conflict in the project design phase, address citizen concerns during implementation, and respond to and manage conflicts when they arise. There was a short presentation followed by Q&A.

Participant List

Presentation:

 

2:30 – 4:00
MC C1-100

Local Climate, Global Change : Development Communication in a Social Media Landscape

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Andrew Steer (Special Envoy for Climate Change, WB), Joydeep Gupta (Secretary, Forum of Environmental Journalists in India), Tara Grumm (Senior Marketing Manager, Microsoft), Rami Khater (Senior New Media Producer, Al Jazeera), CHAIR: Caty Borum Chatto

With more than a quarter million followers already, Connect4Climate, a new global online community that cares about climate change,  shows that young people around the world are hungry for information and eager to get involved.  Social media has flattened the information landscape, allowing more communities to have access to information and increasingly more voices, especially youth from the global South, to be heard

Connect4Climate hosted this session bringing together social media experts, journalists, academics and development communicators to debate how to engage the widest audience possible and raise the bar on climate change discourse and action.  Panelists discussed the following questions:  How can this online energy and engagement be put to best use? How can we better use the tools available to harness more collective intelligence? What is the role of citizen journalism? How can local climate experiences best contribute to global change?

Follow #LCGC hash tag to join the conversation on Twitter
Streaming live at  http://streaming7.worldbank.org/vvflash/extlive1
In addition you can join the ongoing dialogue through Facebook (www.facebook.com/Connect4Climate)

Participant List

 

2:30 – 4:00
MC C1-200

Making the New Deal the Real Deal: Ensuring an Inclusive Peacebuilding and Statebuilding Process

Sponsor: World Bank, Alliance for Peace-Building, and Interaction

Panelists: Donata Garrasi (Coordinator, International Dialogue Peace-building and State-Building, OECD), Francesca Bomboko (g7+ Focal point, Democratic Republic of Congo), Rev. Dr. Tolbert Thomas JALLAH, JR (Secretary General, Fellowship of Christian Councils and Churches in West Africa, (FECCIWA), Paul Okumu Odowgo (Head of Secretariat, Africa CSO Platform on Principled Partnership), Dinorah Granadeiro (Director, NGO Forum Timor-Leste), CHAIR: Dayna Brown (Listening Project Director, CDA Collaborative Learning Projects, Interaction).

At the Fourth High-Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in Busan, a number of countries and international organizations endorsed an agreement on a new global direction for engagement with fragile states. More than 1.5 billion people live in fragile and conflict-affected countries. Caught in cycles of poverty and violence, few of these countries will achieve a single Millennium Development Goal by 2015. The New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States sets out five goals — legitimate politics, justice, security, economic foundations and revenues and services — to give clarity on the priorities in fragile states.

In order to make the New Deal the “Real Deal,” the implementation and monitoring process needs to strengthen the social contract between governments and its citizens. Achieving the State building and Peace building Goals (PSGs) will require not only a more effective “whole of government” approach, but also a “whole of society” approach that effectively engages citizens in creating a national vision and path out of fragility that builds on their resilience and local capacities.  Although there is formal recognition that the quality of ‘state-society’ relations is a central factor, in many fragile and conflict-affected countries, the space for civil society to play a positive role in peacebuilding and development is often limited. 

In this session, panelists and participants discussed how to define and ensure broad citizen participation in the implementation of the New Deal, how to ensure an inclusive process, and the positive roles that civil society actors can play in both state-building and peace-building processes.

 

4:00 – 5:30
MC C1-100

How can the IMF Enhance its Focus on Growth and Poverty Reduction in Low-income Countries?

Sponsors: Save the Children Norway

Panelists: Sigbjørn Johnsen (Minister of Finance, Norway), Samura Kamara (Minister of Finance and Economic Development, Sierra Leone), Matthew Martin (Development Finance International), IMF representative (TBC), Nuria Molina (Save the Children UK), CHAIR: Gunvor Knag Fylkesnes (Save the Children Norway)

The recent study “Enhancing the IMFs Focus on Growth and Poverty Reduction in Low-income Countries” from Development Finance International concludes that the IMF has a way to go to reach its goal of enhancing its focus on poverty reduction and growth in its lending facilities to low income countries. The study therefore recommends important steps that need to be taken in order for the IMF to reach its goal of a more enhanced focus on these areas, in order to enable countries to better combat poverty and safeguard spending on the Millennium Development Goals.

This event put focus on these potential improvements in IMF lending facilities for low income countries, and the panel will discuss how IMF can ensure that its lending facilities best contribute to combating poverty, including by enabling increased investments in the social sector.
 

Participant List

 

4:00 – 5:30
MC C1-200

Mobilizing Civil Society for the Post 2015 Framework

Sponsors: UN Millennium Campaign and Beyond, Roundtable on Post-2015 Goals

Panelists: Jeffrey Huffines (UN Representative, Civicus), Rajiv Joshi (Program Director, The Global Call to Action Against Poverty), Lindsay Coates (Vice President, Interaction), Sering Falu Njie (Deputy Director/Policy Advisor, United Nations Millennium Campaign), Chair: Corinne Woods (Director, United Nations Millennium Campaign).

The UN Secretary-General’s Report to the General Assembly in 2011 stated that the post-2015 development framework is likely to have the best development impact if it emerges from an inclusive, open, and transparent process with multi-stakeholder participation. In this regard, the UN Millennium Campaign is developing and implementing an outreach strategy to civil society which includes policy discussions such as this one. 

The session was organized as a roundtable discussion with presentations and discussion around the following questions: civil society engagement within their constituents; progress to date of the UN and intergovernmental processes; civil society thoughts on the content of a new framework and strategies to ensure that desired results are achieved in an acceptable manner; and building on existing mobilizing processes and the potential for the emergence of Sustainable Development Goals post Rio; and identifying strengths and pitfalls for civil society engagement in the process.
 

Participant List

Presentation:

 

5:00 - 6:30
MC10-507

Inspection Panel Open House

Sponsor:  Inspection Panel / WB

The Inspection Panel is the independent accountability mechanism of the World Bank.  The Panel invites all civil society representatives attending the Annual Meetings, and Bank Management and staff to its Open House in the Panel's offices. Participants shared their experiences and heard stories and anecdotes about Panel operations.

 

 5:00 - 6:30
MC C2-131

The Resilience Dialogue

Sponsors: World Bank, European Union, Government of Japan

Panelists: Mahmoud Mohieldin (Managing Director, WB), Andris Piebalgs (Commissioner for Development, European Union),  Christopher Fields (Co-Chair of the IPCC Working Group II), Armida Alisjahbana (Minister of National Development Planning, Indonesia), Helen Clark (Administrator, UNDP), Maria Kiwanuka (Minister of Finance, Uganda  - TBC), Rajiv Shah (Administrator, USAID), Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala (Minister of Finance, Nigeria - TBC), Valerie Amos (Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations), Naoko Ishii (Deputy Vice Minister of Finance for International Affairs, Japan)

 
The Resilience Dialogue is part of a series of high level dialogues co-hosted by the World Bank, the EU, and Japan, which started with the Closing the Loop event at the 2011 WB-IMF AM. This series of events aims to “close the loop” among the different actors involved in the disaster resilience agenda and come up with concrete recommendations on how to better coordinate towards this common goal. While last years’ event focused on the perspective of international humanitarian and development donors, the Resilience Dialogue at the Spring Meetings will also bring in the perspective of developing countries. Furthermore, the Resilience Dialogue at the Spring Meetings will also address the challenges of connecting the disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation agendas. Climate change adaptation is a building block of resilience – together with humanitarian and development actions.

 

6:00 – 7:00
MC - 12th Floor

Gallery Art Exibition Opening Reception: Through the Eyes of a Woman

Sponsor: World Bank

This event explored perspectives of women from around the world, and displayed works in the World Bank’s collection that are irreverent, stark, fun and colorful, reflecting women’s experiences. 

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Saturday, April 21

9:00 – 10:30
MC C1-100

Safeguards in a Changing Landscape: Perspectives from the Global South

Sponsor: World Resources Institute (WRI)

Panelists: Henry Mugisha Bazira (Water Governance Initiative, Uganda), Mark Grimsditch (China/Cambodia), Bernadinus Steni (HuMA, Indonesia), Roland Widmer (OneAdvisory, Brazil), Stephen Lintner (World Bank), CHAIR: Gaia Larson (WRI)

The landscape of safeguards is in a state of transition. One significant trend is a growing emphasis on the use of national systems to meet safeguard needs. This panel will look at opportunities and challenges associated with this changing geography. Speakers will touch on several elements of the shifting landscape, including the World Bank’s experiment with a country systems approach, the negotiations around REDD+ safeguards, and the emergence of China and Brazil as significant actors. Particular emphasis was placed on the relationship of these developments to the use of national laws and institutions to protect people and the environment, and the search for proper balance between ownership and accountability for all actors involved.

Participant List

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-200

2012 Tokyo Annual Meetings Planning Session

Sponsors: World Bank, IMF, Japanese CSO Planning Group

Panelists: Gabriel Kazuo Tsurumi (Vice Chairperson, Japan NGO Center for International Cooperation / JANIC), Tsubasa Kato (President International Cooperation Students Network Kizuna), Yuki Tanabe (Program Coordinator, Japan Center for a Sustainable Environment and Society / JACSES), John Garrison (Head of Civil Society Team, WB), CHAIR: Karla Chaman (Head of Civil Society Team, IMF)

The purpose of this session was to discuss civil society engagement plans for the Annual Meetings to be held in Tokyo, in October 2012.  Several Japanese CSO and Youth Leaders participated and provided an overview of the plans underway to involve civil society in the Annual Meetings.

Participant List 

 

11:00 – 12:30
MC C1-100

Lessons from IEG's Cluster Review of IFC-supported Extractive Industries Projects

Sponsors: Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) / WB

Panelists: Cherian Samuel (Evaluation Officer, IEG), Rashad Kaldany (Vice President, IFC), Antoine Heuty (Deputy Director, Revenue Watch Institute), Javier Aguilar (Program Manager, EITI MDTF Global Program), Lance Crist (Global Head – Oil & Gas, IFC), Tom Butler (Global Head - Mining, IFC), Stoyan Tenev (Manager, Private Sector Evaluation, IEG), CHAIR: Marvin Taylor-Dormond (Director, Private Sector Evaluation, IEG)

Extractive industries have the potential to contribute significantly to economic development, but pose several challenges to the development community like: market instability; booms, busts, and structural changes; and sustainability issues, especially regarding environmental and social aspects.  Recent booms in commodity prices have brought these issues to the forefront and raise the question:  Will developing countries be in a position to translate the windfalls into development results? 

In this presentation, IEG staff talked about evaluation findings from their review of extractive industries in IFC-supported projects.  The presentation focused on: (i) key findings from recent project evaluations; (ii) factors contributing to development results in the sector; and (iii) lessons of experience.

Watch webcast archived file here.

Participant List

Presentations:

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Post Civil Society Forum Events
 

Sunday, April 22

9:30 - 12:30
IMF HQ2
Room 01-280

A Global Shared Societies Agenda: A strategy to Promote Social Cohesion for Sustainable Development and Growth

Sponsors: Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Club de Madrid, Center of Concern

Panelists: John Bruton (Former Prime Minister of Ireland and Club de Madrid Member), Petre Roman  (Former Prime Minister of Romania and Club de Madrid Member), François Bourguignon (Director, Paris School of Economics), Jack Boorman (Member of the Palais-Royal Initiative), Hugh Bredenkamp (International Monetary Fund).


In 2011 the cosponsors held two high-level conferences at the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Headquarters to discuss the linkage of reform of the international financial and monetary system, and the prioritization of policies that promote equitable and shared societies. This high level seminar focused on what is required to forge a new, international consensus to directly incorporate social as well as hard economic considerations into the framework of the international monetary and financial system.  It also discussed ways to introduce impact indicators on social conditions into the policy performance goals that Member States are required to meet by the international financial institutions.
 

 

Monday, April 23

8:30 – 5:30
American Institute of Architects
(1735 New York Avenue NW)

EIR + 10: Looking Ahead

Sponsors:  Bank Information Center, World Bank

Panelists: S. Vijay Iyer (Director of Sustainable Energy Department, WB), Clive Armstrong (Lead Economist, Global Infrastructure & Natural Resources,  IFC), Paul Sein Twa (Karen Environmental and Social Action Network, Burma), Bishop Joachim Kouraleyo (Bishop of Moundou, Chad), Gary Milante (Conflict unit at Operations Policy and Country Services, WB), Natty Davis (Chairman of the National Investment Commission, Liberia), Juan  Carlos Jintiach (Coordinator of Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon Basin, Ecuador), Rodion Sulyandziga (Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Russia), Patty Miller (Lead Environmental Specialist, IFC), Maryse Robert (Chief of Trade Section, Organization of American States), Chris Anderson (Rio Tinto), Ravi Rebbapragada (Samata Association for People, India), Djéralar Miankéol (Researcher and Agronomist, Chad), Adriana Eftimie (Mining Specialist/Gender Coordinator, Oil, Gas and Mining Division, WB), Lesley Bennett (Papua New Guinea Women in Mining and Petroleum Program PNG Chamber of Mines and Petroleum), Paulo de Sa (Manager, Oil, Gas, and Mining Unit, WB)
CHAIRS: Krista Hendry (Fund for Peace ), David Hunter (Washington College of Law), Chris Neal (Energy Team, WB)


Extractive industries can help drive development. But this potential is often unrealized or even derailed due to conflict, corruption, and disrupted communities and quality of life.  Ten years ago, the World Bank Group launched a review of its work with countries on extractive industries. The EI Review included commitments on governance, transparency, environmental and social risk mitigation, and community rights and benefits. What progress has been made? Where do we go from here? Experts from civil society in affected countries and communities, as well as analysts from industry, government and IFIs discussed these questions.

 

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Last updated: 2012-05-16




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