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2012 Annual Meetings - Civil Society Policy Forum

Civil Society Policy Forum
Tokyo, Japan
October 10 - 13, 2012

The Civil Society Policy Forum was held from Wednesday, October 10 to Saturday, October 13, prior to, and during the 2012 Annual Meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank Group (WBG). It was organized by the Bank and Fund Civil Society Teams. The Forum brought together IMF and WBG staff, CSO representatives, government officials, academics, and others to exchange views on a variety of topics ranging from the global economic crisis and food security, to health.  There were 60 sessions in total which were organized by Bank, Fund, and CSOs individually or jointly. 

The CS Forum also included a Townhall Meeting with Bank President Jim Yong Kim and Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde, and a CSO Roundtable with Executive Directors from the IMF and WBG.  Several sessions were also organized prior to the CS Forum including a Capacity-building session on the IMF and an Orientation session on the WBG.  The CS Forum sessions were held at the Tokyo International Forum (TIF).

Please see below summaries, blogs, web archives, power point presentations and a photo gallery of all events held during the policy forum.  If you have questions regarding this event, please contact us by sending email to: civilsociety@worldbank.org or by phone: +1 (202) 473 1840.   

Civil Society Program Photo Gallery

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursday

Friday

Saturday

Pre-Civil Society Forum Events
 

Monday, October 8

9:30 am – 5:00 pm
Tokyo International Forum (TIF)
Hall: B5 

Capacity-Building Session on the IMF  /  Orientation Session on the World Bank

Sponsors:  IMF, WBG

Panelists: IMF:  Vasuki Shastry, Kate Landgon, Alistair Thomson, Jeremy Mark (External Relations Department), Karla Chaman (Civil Society Team); WB: Jill Wilkins (External Affairs Department, WB), John Garrison (Civil Society Team, WB), Yukako Hiraki (Tokyo Office), Leonora Gonzales (Manila Office)

Coffee, tea, and cookies will be served

Agenda

Presentation:

Tuesday, October 9

17:00 – 18:30
TIF
Hall: B7-1

CSO Roundtable with Executive Directors

Sponsors: IMF, WBG

Panelists: Hideaki Suzuki (WB Executive Director for Japan), Merza Hasan (WB Executive Director for Kuwait / Middle Eastern Constituency),Emele  Duituturaga (Executive Secretary, Pacific Islands Association of Non-Governmental Organizations / PIANGO), Milwida Guevara (President, Synergia Foundation) 

This will be a roundtable discussion between IMF and WBG Executive Directors with civil society representatives accredited to the Annual Meetings.  The purpose of this event is to promote an exchange of views and discussion on key issues of the 2012 Annual Meeting agenda: global economy, disaster resilience, social and environmental safeguards, and global health.

Transcript

 

CIVIL SOCIETY POLICY FORUM EVENTS 
October 10 - 13

Wednesday, October 10

8:30 – 9:00
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room:  251

Welcome Breakfast

Sponsors:  International Monetary Fund / World Bank Group

Panelists: Karla Chaman (IMF),  John Garrison, Leonora Gonzales, Yukako Hiraki, Nneka Okereke (WB)

Come meet the Fund and Bank Civil Society Team staff, learn about Annual Meetings activities such as the CS Forum policy sessions, CSO Townhall with Ms. Lagarde and Mr. Kim, CSO Roundtable with Executive Directors, Program of Seminars, and discuss meeting logistics.

 

9:00 – 10:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room:  251

Water Privatization Management Issues

Sponsors: Asia Pacific Network for Food Sovereignty (APNFS)

Panelists: Arze Glipo (Asia-Pacific Network for Food Sovereignty / APNFS, Philippines), Dwi Astuti (Bina Desa, Indonesia), Jahangir Hasan Masum (Coastal Development Partnership / CDP, Bangladesh)

Many developing countries have seen an intensification and acceleration of efforts to institute policy reforms in their water sector in recent years. Many of these policies are based upon the principles of the Integrated Water Resource Management Framework (IWRM). IWRM emphasizes the need for more efficient management and allocation of increasingly scarce water resources using the concept of river basins as a framework for water resources planning and investment. Treating water as a finite resource, IWRM not only advocates for efficient management but pushes for the institutionalization of water pricing and tradeable water rights in order to promote “efficient utilization and conservation of water”. 

These wide-ranging water sector reforms are now being institutionalized either through new legislations or executive actions by governments in the South. The recent reforms are not only widening the scope of the water privatization policies in mid-90s, but are designed to transform radically the concept of water as commons and a public good. By institutionalizing water pricing, the new framework legitimizes control over water and water resources by private companies who have the ability to pay for higher value water. 

These reforms clearly have not taken into account the lessons of the privatization policies in the mid-90s as well as the reforms introduced in water-related sectors such as irrigated agriculture. While the water privatization in the past decade pointed to the need to bring safe water to everyone, to date, millions of poor households do not have access to potable water and millions more are suffering from high water tariffs. In the rural areas, poor farmers are burdened by poorly performing irrigation systems despite the push for participatory irrigation in the past.

Given these experiences, the APNFS hopes to provide a space for discussing the implications of current water policy reforms. It will tackle how conflicts in water utilization may have intensified as a result of policies and programs that have increasingly privatized and commodified water. It will also present concrete actions to pursue water justice and some alternative water governance models that  highlight greater community and public participation and thus improves access to water of economically vulnerable sectors including small farmers, pastoralists, artisanal fishers, and particularly women. 

Participant List

Presentations:
 

 

 

9:00 – 10:30
TIF
 Hall: D1

Assessing an Enabling Environment for Civil Society

Sponsor:  CIVICUS

Panelists:  Mandeep Tiwana (Policy and Advocacy Manager, CIVICUS), Baquer Namazi (Voices of the Poor Initiative), Jan Aart Scholte (University of Warwick), Nurgul Dhzanaeva (Forum of Women NGOs of Kyrgyzstan)

 

Civil society organizations (CSOs) and citizen activists worldwide currently operate in extremely dynamic and volatile circumstances.  Many CSOs are facing multi-faceted crises, which include problems caused by: a growing disenabling legal, and political environment; significant state backlash against CSOs and activists; and a deteriorating funding climate.  On the global stage, despite increasing visibility and mobilization, CSOs continue to experience limited access to and a lack of genuine space to influence key multilateral policy forums and governance processes.

In light of these complex, rapidly changing factors affecting civil society, a number of CSOs have highlighted the need to identify and systematically track emerging trends for the contested enabling environment for civil society organizations, the changing shape of citizens’ civic participation, the shifting resourcing of CSOs, and the space and impact that civil society is able to make at the multilateral level.  Notably, an assessment of the enabling environment for civil society will assist multilateral institutions in gauging whether governments are upholding their commitments towards guaranteeing the core civil society freedoms of expression, association and assembly. The assessment will also be a critical advocacy and engagement tool to ensure better protection of civil society freedoms.

The session will seek to engender dialogue on the need to assess the operating environment for civil society as well as elicit ideas on towards carrying out the assessments.

*  Japanese language interpretation will be offered.

Participant List

 

 11:00 – 12:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 253

Capacity Building in Practice: What Does it Mean for Farmers’ Organizations?

Sponsor:  Network of Agri-agencies in Europe, Africa, and Asia (AgriCord)

Panelists:  Ignace Coussement (AgriCord), Marlene Ramirez (AsiaDHRRA, Philippines), Socrates Banuzuela (Asian Farmers Association for Sustainable Rural Development / AFA, Philippines),  Dwi Astuti (AsiaDHRRA, Indonesia), Tomoko Arakawa (Asian Rural Institute -  Japan), Mohamed Beavogui  (Director, Partnership and Resource Mobilization & Senior Advisor to the President, IFAD) 

The Farmers Fighting Poverty Programme builds capacities of farmers’ organizations in more than 60 developing countries. Over the last 3 years, leaders and staff of these farmers’ organizations have been asked to formulate the key competencies, for which capacity building is needed. The resulting 17 competencies will be presented to the audience, covering such issues as: member participation, financial management, participatory policy making, and providing access to resources.  AgriCord is also carrying out an inventory of the perceptions of farmer leaders from different countries in Asia and in Africa on the impact of their work.

This session will encourage the audience to consider the concrete and specific objectives of capacity building, as well as the ways to monitor its impact .

*  Japanese language interpretation will be offered.

Participant List

Presentations:

 

11:00 – 12:30
TIF/CSO CENTER
Room: 251

Basic Education and the World Bank’s 2010 Pledge

Sponsor: Results

Panelists: Carolyn Reynolds (Communications Adviser World Bank), April Golden (Operations Analyst, Global Partnership for Education), Tony Baker (Education for All Campaign Manager, RESULTS), Katie Malouf Bous (Policy Advisor - Education and Health, Oxfam International), CHAIR: Takafumi Miyake (Secretary-General, Japan NGO Network for Education)

While in recent years IDA financing for basic education worldwide has been increasing overall, it has been decreasing in many of the countries most off-track from reaching the education MDGs, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, there are growing trends in which IDA support to basic education is decreasing in countries that are part of the Global Partnership for Education (GPE), the membership to which indicates a particular need and readiness for additional education support.

To address these trends, the World Bank in 2010 pledged to increase IDA support to basic education by $750 million over the 2011-15 period. This session will examine: i) recent trends in IDA support to basic education, paying specific attention to complements formed by IDA funds in concurrence with grants from the GPE; ii) progress on the 2010 pledge; and iii) mechanisms which may be put in place to help increase the effectiveness of IDA support to basic education.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered


Participant List

Presentation

11:00 – 12:30
TIF
 Hall: D1

Global Townhall on Women, Sustainable Peace, and Economic Growth

Sponsors: Naija Worldwide Charities, Global Women Africa Network (GLOW)

Panelists:  Yvette Chesson-Wureh (Establishment Coordinator of the Angie Brooks International Center for Women's Empowerment, Liberia), Frannie Leautier (Executive Secretary of the African Capacity Building Foundation, Tanzania) Jeanine Cooper (OCHA Representative to the African Union, Liberia), Terry Kairu-Kiambu (Financial Advisor for Solutions-Global Network, Kenya), Esther Ejim (Executive Director of Naija Worldwide Charities, Nigeria), Thelma Horton (Principal of Zoweh Holdings, US), Aisha Audu-Emeje  (Former First Lady of Kogi State, Nigeria), CHAIR: Rosa Malango (Chief for External Relations & Partnerships, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs)

This session will define priority areas of action that should be catalogued and recognized by governments in Africa; the Diaspora; international and inter-governmental organizations; NGOs, and the media among others.  A Tokyo Declaration on Women – Sustainable Peace and Economic Growth will be issued to convey the commitments made and facilitate monitoring of actions posted by people from around the world on an online platform. 

Strengthening the relationship between African women in Africa and the Diaspora is a winning combination.  This partnership has the potential to increase the exchange of knowledge, resources as well as relevant and sustainable technology. 

This session is being hosted by Naija Worldwide Charities, a US based charitable organization dedicated to rebuilding lives worldwide through health and education, in collaboration with Global Women- Africa Network (GLOW), a grassroots alliance of African women in Africa and the Diaspora.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

 

11:00 – 12:30
TIF
Hall: E / Seminar 2

Seizing the Opportunity: Jobs in the Middle East and North Africa

Sponsor:  World Bank, Middle East Region (MENA)

Panelists:  Nizar Baraka (Minister of Economy and Finance, Morocco), Steen Jorgensen (Sector Director for Human Development, MENA Region, WB), Dr. Omneia Helmy (Acting Executive Director, Egyptian Center for Economic Studies), Asim G. Keskin (Deputy Director General, Turkish Employment Institution / ISKUR), CHAIR: Inger Andersen (Vice President, MENA Region, WB)

While political transitions are underway across much of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, the struggle to find a decent job has not become any easier. MENA has the world’s highest rate of youth unemployment and the fewest women in the labor force. The region’s new governments have an opportunity to enact game-changing reforms to create a more dynamic private sector that will drive growth and generate jobs.

Managing change on this scale will require building a consensus around a shared view on the obstacles in the way of growth and job creation, and engaging all stakeholders in a plan for overcoming them. Every transition is unique, but MENA will be able to draw on the experiences of other regions that have faced similar circumstances, and provide lessons for regions that will face similar challenges in the future.

Findings from a forthcoming flagship report from the MENA region of the World Bank, will be presented in a seminar at the Annual Meetings of the institution in Tokyo. Panelists will discuss their experiences in helping regions build the consensus needed for the creation of more equitable societies, which provide opportunities for the many rather than the few, and the respective role of governments and civil society in the process.

 

12:30 – 14:00
TIF/CSO CENTER
Room: 253

Banking on Health: World Bank and African Development Bank Spending on Reproductive Health and HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

Sponsor: Gender Action

Panelists: Claire Lauterbach (Gender Action), Dr. Joan Awunyo-Akaba (Future Generations International), Jessica Espey (Save the Children),  CHAIR: Dr. Nahid Toubia (RAINBO; Columbia University School of Public Health)

Global reproductive health has improved significantly over the past 20 years. Yet sub-Saharan Africa still has the highest maternal death and HIV-infection rates worldwide. The ‘Banking on Health’ panel will discuss reproductive health and HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa and multilateral development banks’ current and future roles in this field.

Participant List

 

12:30 – 14:00
TIF/CSO CENTER
Room: 251

Aid Transparency and Effectiveness - Reconsidering the Accountability of Japan's ODA in Comparison with WB Policies

Sponsors: ODA Reform Network, Japan

Panelists: Yuki Tanabe (Japan Center for a Sustainable Environment and Society / JACSES), Sanae Fujita (Essex University), Junichi Yamada (Director General of Operations Strategy Department, JICA), CHAIR: Kiyotaka Takahashi (ODA Reform Network)

Aid is a scarce and precious resource, which, if spent well, can make a major difference to the lives and prospects of people and countries receiving it.The starting point for ensuring that aid makes a difference is timely, comprehensive, and comparable information.  However, unfortunately aid transparency is a very low priority issue in Japan at the moment, partly because Japan feels that it is already doing a lot to increase the 'visibility' of Japanese ODA, and partly because the Japanese government perceives the high cost of implementing open-source data, particularly difficult in period of severe fiscal austerity. At the same time, the World Bank is the best performer in the index of international common standard of aid transparency such as IATI (Japan is 21st in the same index). 

This session will address how aid transparency of Japanese ODA could be improved, and how Japanese CSOs could contribute towards this. It will particularly focus on JICA's country analytical work under preparation, which is equivalent to WB's country assistance strategies.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

Presentations:

 

 14:00 – 15:30
TIF / CSO Center
Room 253

Role of Farmer Organizations / Civil Society Organizations in Public and Private Investment Programs

Sponsors:  Asian Farmers Association for Sustainable Rural Development (AFA), Asian Partnership for the Development of Human
Resources in Rural Areas (AsiaDHRRA)

Panelists: Raul Socrates Banzuela ( Asian Farmers' Association/AFA), Marlene Ramirez (Asian Partnership for the Development of Human Resources/AsiaDHRRA), Dan Peters (Senior Advisor, Office of the US Executive Director, World Bank )

The Global Agricultural Food Security Program (GAFSP) is a multilateral trust fund entrusted to the World Bank, aimed to scale up agricultural assistance to low income countries. The idea of a global food security initiative was first discussed in a G8+ meeting in L'Aquila in 2009 in which leaders pledged more than $20billion. To date, nine donors have pledged a total of USD 1.2 B to GAFSP's public and private sector windows. The resources received from the donors as of August 31, 2012 amounted to approximately USD $855.1M, which represents 68.7%of the total pledge. So far 18 countries have had projects worth $658 million approved, based on country led, country driven plans.

GAFSP has a unique governance structure – at least the public sector window of GAFSP –  where CSOs join representatives of recipient country governments, donor agencies, and supervising entities to discuss individual proposals, policy, and work plans. Whilst CSOs are non-voting members of the SC along with the supervising entities, decisions so far have been made in an open and transparent manner. However, the same governance structure does not permeate to the private sector window where the donor committee and IFC essentially decide.

In this session, panelists will discuss the opportunities, challenges, and issues faced by CSOs, particularly farmers' organizations (FOs), as they engage governments and WB itself to make GAFSP more responsive and participatory.  The ultimate goal is to make it more accountable to the citizens, particularly to the low-income women and men farmers who are primary stakeholders and contributors to ensuring food and nutrition security in our world.

Participant List 

Presentations:

 

14:00 – 15:30
TIF/CSO CENTER
Room: 251

Making Global Governance Accountable: Civil Society Experiences with 13 Institutions

Sponsor: Centre for the Study of Globalization and Regionalization (CSGR), University of Warwick

Panelists: Jan Aart Scholte (University of Warwick), Sheela Patel (Slum Dwellers International), John Garrison (World Bank), Karla Chaman (International Monetary Fund), Jo Marie Griesgraber (New Rules for Global Finance)

In the absence of global parliaments and global elections, it is often hoped that civil society can be the force of democratic accountability in global governance. But how far is this promise realized? Where it falls short, what can be done to raise civil society's game? This session discusses conclusions reached on these questions by the Civil Society and Accountable Global Governance project. This project looked at the record of civil society engagements of the IMF, the World Bank and 11 other global institutions. Among other things, the session will consider what we can learn from civil society experiences with other global agencies that could maybe enhance civil society relations with the Bank and Fund.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

14:00 – 15:30
TIF
Hall D1 

Why and How Should Youth be Engaged in Addressing Societal Issues?

Sponsor:  Connect Lanka

Panelists: Patrick Wei (Youth-Diplomacy, FRANCE), Hakou Hermann (Youth Development and Peace Network / YDP-CI, CÔTE D'IVOIRE), Stephen Nkem Asek (International Governance Institute - Focal Integrity Team for Cameroon, CAMEROON), Kemi B. Fadojutimi (Dare2Dream - ALL EYES ON AFRICA), Andi Schubert (Young Researchers' Collective, SRI LANKA), Dr. Sakena Yacoobi (Afghan Institute of Learning / AIL, AFGHANISTAN), Edith Jibunoh (ONE / International), Herman Nyamunga (Africa Center CSO Accountability and Aid Effectiveness), Rosemary Anderson Akolaa (Participatory Action for Rural Development / PARDA), Daichi Hirose (Social Innovation Asia, JAPAN), Dr Nahid Toubia (Mentor Imagine, SUDAN), CHAIR: Fadhil Bakeer Markar (Connect Lanka,  Sri Lanka),

Youth around the world are seen as people who can make a difference in their society. Their passion, commitment and belief usually are the ingredients that drive them to make such differences and address societal issues. However, many see youth as a negative force, or they do not tend to take them seriously for variety of reasons. This roundtable session is for youth and others from around the world to engage in a discussion as to why and how should youth be engaged in addressing societal issues, and whether they really utilize their potential to the maximum.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

 

16:00 – 17:30
TIF
Hall: D1

Empowering Civil Society to Take Part in Governance

Sponsor:  Synergia Foundation

Panelists: Mandeep Tiwana (Policy and Advocacy Manager, Civicus), Bert Hoffman (Chief Economist, East Asia and the Pacific, WB), CHAIR:  Milwida Guevara (President, Syenrgeia)

The engagement of civil society can promote accountability and participatory governance.  Government programs can be more relevant to the needs of communities if civil society groups are involved in planning and decision-making.  However, the engagement of civil society in governance processes is often ad hoc, sporadic, and selective.  There are no formal mechanisms through which the participation of civil society in governance can be made more inclusive, systematic, and sustained.  Civil society groups often lack the capacity for meaningful political engagement, and they may need to have greater access to information so that their analysis and recommendations are evidenced-based. 

This session will engage the participants on best practices on how national and central governments have provided opportunities and programs to draw greater participation from civil society groups.  It will also focus on how civil society organizations have influenced their governments to make them partners in governance.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

 

16:00 – 17:30
TIF/CSO CENTER
Room: 253

Asian Land Investments - What Drives Them and What's Happening to Small Food Producers

Sponsors: Asian NGO Coalition for Agrarian Reform and Rural Development (ANGOC), Asian Farmers Association for Sustainable Rural Development (AFA), Asia Pacific Network for Food Sovereignty (APNFS)

Panelists:  Nathaniel Don E. Marquez (Asian NGO Coalition for Agrarian Reform and Rural Development / ANGOC, Philippines), Haoming Huang (China Association of NGOs / CANGO), Raul Socrates Banzuela (National Federation of Small Farmers in the Philippines / PAKISAMA), Arze Glipo (Asia-Pacific Network on Food Sovereignty)

The new wave of land investments in Asia are much larger in scale, and are spearheaded by more government-led investment than in the past. What further makes this new wave of investments different is that it seeks resources (land, water) rather than commodities and markets; it seeks production for repatriation rather than for commercial export; and it involves actual production rather than joint ventures or contract farming. While investors are typically large and wealthy transnational firms or rich governments, host countries are poor or embroiled in political conflict – thus raising questions about the terms and impacts of such acquisitions.

Small-holder farmers are now faced with more difficult challenges in dealing adequately with these large-scale and sometimes, foreign investors interested to use their lands. Over and above their issues of food insecurity and poverty, they now have to contend with technical contracts and erroneous terms that threaten the small farmers’ land ownership and other basic rights (e.g., health, just compensation, housing).

This session will discuss land investments in Asia from the lens of the small farmers.  Presentations will come from smallholder groups working on land and water issues and an overview of the issues and challenges with today’s land investments from ANGOC. A Chinese NGO, CANGO, will give an outlook of China’s investment policies, especially those put into agricultural lands in other Asian countries.

Participant List 

Presentations:

 

16:00 – 17:30
TIF/CSO CENTER
Room: 251

Results & Sustainability: Rights-based Perspectives

Sponsors: IBON International, Reality of Aid Asia Pacific, Japanese NGO Center for International Cooperation (JANIC)

Panelists: Emele Duituturaga (Executive Director, Pacific Islands Association of Non-Governmental Organizations /Steering Committee Member, Reality of Aid Asia Pacific), Jennifer Malonzo (Global Secretariat Coordinator, Reality of Aid Network), Masaaki Ohashi (Chairperson, JANIC),  CHAIR: Nurgul Djanaeva (President, Forum of Women's NGOs of Kyrgyzstan/Steering Committee Member, Reality of Aid Asia Pacific)

The session will look into results and sustainability assumptions, as well as expectations of current development programs and strategies through a rights-based lens. How are results identified and defined? What are the implications for communities, ecosystems and the commons? Will these foster genuine results for human rights and sustainable development? This session provides a space for a public conversation on these issues to draw lessons for a sustainable and inclusive development agenda.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

Presentations:

 

16:00 – 17:15

Hotel Okura Akebono

(Shuttle buses from TIF to Hotel Okura available)

PROGRAM OF SEMINAR SESSION: Good Management Of Natural Resources: Lessons and Opportunities for Low-Income Countries

Sponsor:  International Monetary Fund

Panelists: Miguel Castilla (Minister of Economy and Finance, Peru), Paul Collier (Professor of Economics, Oxford University, United Kingdom), Kwabena Duffuor  (Minister of Finance and Economic Planning, Ghana) Naoyuki Shinohara (Deputy Managing Director, International Monetary Fund), Clare Short  (Chair, Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, United Kingdom), CHAIR:  Andrew Stevens (Anchor and Correspondent, CNN, Hong Kong)

 

Many countries face challenges to realize the full potential of their exhaustible natural resources and avoid the pitfalls that have plagued resource-rich countries in the past. This is particularly the case for low-income countries, which have huge development needs but often weak institutions. Economic challenges include optimal resource taxation, fiscal policy design, exchange rate management, managing volatility, and promoting economic diversification. There are also significant political challenges, including establishing contracts that balance the country's interests with those of companies, building strong domestic institutions, etc. The seminar will discuss these challenges, drawing on lessons from successful countries and the opportunities that good management of natural resource can offer low-income.

 

Key questions to be addressed will include:

 

·         Economic policy: How to deal with the volatility and exhaustibility of resource revenue? How fast can spending be scaled up without compromising economic stability, economic diversification, and the efficiency of government spending? What role can sovereign wealth funds play in the management of resource revenues?

·         Tax policy: What tax regime best balances the benefits from natural resources for the country and the interests of the extractive companies?

·         Transparency: What is the role of transparency and good governance in ensuring that tax revenues from natural resources are being properly collected and put to good use?

·         Diversification: How to promote diversification of natural resource rich economies so to generate equitable growth and employment creation in the non-resource sector?

 

 

 

18:00 – 19:00
TIF
Hall: D5

Youth Dialogue with IMF Deputy Managing Director Nemat Shafik

Sponsor:  International Monetary Fund

Panelist: Nemat Shafik (Deputy Managing Director, IMF)  Moderator: Saki Yagi (Anchor, Nippon Television Network Corporation)

This will be a moderated conversation between Nemat Shafik with winners of the IMF Essay Contest 2012, as well as with students from universities in China, Korea, Singapore, and Thailand.


 

19:30 – 21:00
Sumida City Gymnasium
4-15-1 Kinshi,
Sumida-ward, Tokyo

Sport For Smile Square Special 2012

Sponsors: Sport For Smile, Japan Balloon Volleyball Association, Japan Blind Soccer Association, and Japan Floor Hockey Federation

Panelists: Katsuhiko Murasawa (Director of Japan Floor Hockey Federation), Eigo Matsuzaki (Secretary General of Japan Blind Soccer Association), Daisuke Hashimoto (Director of Japan Balloon Volleyball Association), CHAIR: Mie Kajikawa (Founder of Sport For Smile)

Sport is an effective tool for promoting social inclusion, and various stakeholders, including public, private, and citizen organizations have been actively involved in the process.  “Sport For Smile Square” (SFS Square) provides you with the opportunities to enjoy universal sports with diverse teams – kids to seniors; men and women; people with and without disabilities; orphans; refugees and foreign workers; among others – to learn how diversity and inclusion contributes to team work. 

This “SFS Square Special 2012” event is being specially organized for the Annual Meetings of the IMF / WBG, and you can enjoy blind soccer, floor hockey, and balloon volleyball with experienced coaches. The goal is to not only win, but also demonstrate that in sports all people, even those who usually need the support of others, can “lead.” Exercising sports with a “smile” will revitalize your brain and keep you healthy.

How about taking a break on Wednesday night to get better prepared for the upcoming vital sessions while learning the core value of the world?
For details and registration, please visit: http://www.sport4smile.com/en/squaresp2012.html


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Thursday, October 11

 9:00 - 10:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 251

The World Bank Safeguards: Lessons from IEG Evaluation, Directions for Change

Sponsors:  Bank Information Center (BIC), Ugerwald, World Resources Institute (WRI), 11.11.11

Panelists: Korinna Horta (Urgewald), Stephen Lintner (World Bank), Dr. Thein Shwe, (Adjunct Professor at Chiang Mai University’s Center for Myanmar’s Economic Studies), CHAIR: Konstantin Huber  (World Bank Executive Director, Austria)

The World Bank is currently preparing to revise its safeguard policy framework. The Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) presented many of the key challenges for updating this framework in its 2010 evaluation report “Safeguards and Sustainability in a Changing World.” One of its key recommendations was the need to balance upfront risk assessment with implementation support to increase effectiveness; strengthen safeguards monitoring, evaluation, and completion reporting; and partner with clients, third parties, and local communities to enhance ownership and results. Beyond the safeguard policy framework, IEG also pointed to the Bank’s incentive structure as an important area for review. 

This session will review the central findings of the IEG evaluation, and discuss how lessons from the evaluation process might shape the safeguard review.


* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

Presentation:

 9:00 - 10:30
TIF
Hall: D1

Applying Lessons from Human Resources Development for TB Control in Japan to  International Health Systems

Sponsor: Stop TB Partnership Japan

Panelists: Tadao Shimao (Adviser, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association), Hideo Maeda (Deputy Director General for Technical Affairs, Tokyo Metropolitan Government Bureau of Social Welfare and Public Health), Shiro Konuma (Director, Global Health Policy Division, International Cooperation Bureau, Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Eiji Marui (Professor, University of Human Arts and Sciences), Reshad Khaled (Head of Board, Director in Chief, Medical Association KENSHIKAI Reshad Clinic Karez Health and Educational services), Rajendra Prasad Pant (Director, National Tuberculosis Centre,Thimi Bhaktapur Nepal), Richard D'Meza (Former Director, National Tuberculosis Control Programme, Ministry of Public Health and Population, Haiti), CHAIR: Toru Mori (Director Emeritus, Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association Board Representative, Stop TB Partnership Japan)

In addition to economic development, a stable society requires a high level of human security to promote sound development. For this reason, it is necessary to have adequate investments in order to strengthen national health services. The development of human resources is a central component in health policy, as noted recently by WHO. Health services worldwide are confronting complicated and diversified problems that have  emerged as a consequence of rapid changes in the: global economic situation; demographic and epidemiological transitions; environmental and climate changes; as well as changes in people's way of thinking. In order to properly address these issues, it is urgent that we ensure sufficient human resources with high capability in the health sector of every country.

This session will discuss the issue of developing human health resources from the viewpoint of how it should be achieved, based on the experience of the international training course for TB control in Japan.  The discussion will attempt to address the following questions:

  • What are the achievements and lessons learned from the one-disease-oriented, vertical program of the Japanese bilateral health cooperation experience?  What about the limitations of this approach, how can these be addressed?
  •  Japan has a long tradition and is recognized as the world's leader in developing human resources for Tuberculosis (TB) control. What are the impacts and lessons?
  •  Can technical know-how obtained from the experience in TB control, particularly human resources development, be applied to other health areas, or more comprehensively, to the overall health system?
  •  Is it possible for TB control and other health areas to communicate better so that they can enhance each other? If this is possible, what is the most effective approach?
  •  What were the achievements and lessons from the MDG strategy? What health policy is needed in the post-MDG era, and how should we approach human resource development in the latter? What roles can Japan play there?

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

Presentations: 

 

10:30  - 11:30
Hotel Okura Heian

PROGRAM OF SEMINARS SESSION:  Restoring Hope: Policy Options for Jobs & Growth

Sponsor:  International Monetary Fund

Panelists:  Montek Singh Ahluwalia (Deputy Chairman, Planning Commission, India), Anders Borg (Minister of Finance, Sweden), Sharan Burrow (General Secretary, International Trade Union Confederation, Belgium), Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala (Minister of Finance, Nigeria), Min Zhu (Deputy Managing Director, IMF), CHAIR:  Sara Eisen (Correspondent, Bloomberg Television, United States)

 

Over 200 million people worldwide are unemployed, with double-digit jobless rates in many European countries and in many emerging markets. Youth unemployment and long-term unemployment are at alarmingly high levels. At the same time, countries are searching for a new model of growth that is inclusive and not dependent on financial excesses.

 

The seminar will bring together economic leaders from various regions and global institutions to discuss policy options for fostering job creation and inclusive growth. The focus will be on the role of macroeconomic and labor market policies, and on the international coordination of polices to manage the effects of a global marketplace for jobs.  Key questions to be addressed will include:

 

·         In the near-term: what policies can move growth closer to potential? Would recovery in growth also promote recovery in labor markets? If growth prospects remain weak, what policies can ease the pain in labor markets?

·         Over the medium term: Does the world need a new growth model? Can inclusive growth provide a new growth framework for the post-global crisis era? Can finance be harnessed to serve the common good? How can countries avoid the resource curse? Can we avoid a global competition for jobs?

 

 

 

11:00 - 12:30
TIF/ CSO CENTER
Room:  251 

Halting the Global Land Rush: Protecting Land Rights and Promoting Food Security

Sponsor: Oxfam International

Panelists: 

Panelists: Hannah Stoddart (Head of Land Campaign, Oxfam International), Nathaniel Don E. Marquez (Executive Director, Asian NGO Coalition for Agrarian Reform and Rural Development / ANGOC), CHAIR: Zanny Minton-Beddoes (Economics Editor, The Economist)

In the past decade there has been a shocking acceleration of land sales: the equivalent to a soccer pitch is bought and sold every second. Globally, the amount of land acquired between 2000-2010 could have been used to grow food for more than one billion people. With food prices spiking for the third time in four years, interest in land is very likely to accelerate again as rich countries try to secure their food supplies, and investors reach for land as a good long-term bet. And all too often these land deals in developing countries result in forced evictions of poor farmers.

Developing country governments meanwhile are struggling to find a balance between investment in agriculture that can meet the growing food demands of their citizens, and respecting the rights and livelihoods of all who depend upon the land. This event will discuss how to invest in agriculture in a responsible way, including research on the scale of the global rush for land, and it will explore potential solutions to the problem, including the role that the World Bank  can and must play.

 

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

Presentations:

 

11:00 - 12:30
TIF
Hall: D1

New Values from Japan, From Money-Centered to Life-Centered Value: Past 50 Years and Next 50 Years

Sponsors: Earth Summit 2012Japan,  World Shift Network Japan

Panelists: Seiichiro Yonekura (Professor, Institute of Innovation Research, Hitotsubashi University), Tsuyoshi Yoshiwara (President, Johnan Shinkin Bank), Tetsu Hattori (Director, EarthSummit 2012 Japan), CHAIR: Tomoyo Nonaka (Gaia Initiative Corporation)

How can we balance sustainable society with economic development? This session will propose new features of an economic and social system from the experience of past half-century of Japan and 2,000 ideas for "the future we want". The last time the WB/IMF Annual Meetings were held in Japan in 1964, the country was in the midst of rapid economic growth. First, we'll overview economic development aspects, sharing lessons learned from Japan's economic and social development of the last 50 years.

Then, we'll overview sustainable development aspects, sharing ideas  from "Japan Voices for RIO+20" toward next 50 years,  based on the recognition that fundamental shift of economic and social system is required for us, since  we experienced the Megaquake and Fukushima nuclear accidents.  The shift from money-centered value to life-centered value is the development paradigm of modern Japan after the Meiji Restoration, an approach which is geared to valuing nature and human development.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

Presentations:

11:00 - 12:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 253

Global Financial Regulations and their Impact on Major Campaigns

Sponsor: New Rules for Global Finance Coalition

CHAIRS: Eric LeCompte (Jubilee Network USA), Jo Marie Griesgraber (New Rules)

The G20 through the Financial Stability Board (FSB), Standard Setting Bodies, and other institutions are seeking to harmonize financial standards.  What does the work in these arenas mean for food security (through derivatives and commodity speculation) or access to credit (banking regulations designed for advanced economies)?  What are they doing—or NOT doing!—to address sovereign indebtedness?  To address illicit financial flows and related problems of tax avoidance and tax evasion?   This is the moment for campaigners and financial regulation nerds to come together and strategize so all are more effective.  Also, the FSB says it’s more transparent and accountable.  Does your region know about its “Regional Consultative Group”?  When does it meet?  Who sets the agenda?  Who decides who attends?  What decisions do they make?  Even regional Central Bank Presidents don’t know!!  We have a lot to learn from one another and a lot of work to do!

Activists who campaign on debt, taxes, commodity price speculation, banks, and trade-and-financial services will be present and the linkages between financial regulations and grass roots campaigns will be explored.  This will be a collegial information-sharing and strategy session.

Participant List 

 

12:30 – 13:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 251

The Role of the Independent Evaluation Group

Sponsor:  Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) / World Bank Group

Panelists: Caroline Heider (Director-General and Senior Vice President IEG), Chad Dobson (Executive Director Bank Information Center), John Garrison (Senior Civil Society Specialist, WB), CHAIR: Vivian R. Jackson (Communications Officer, IEG)

Independent evaluation is an important function for development effectiveness.  Audience members will have the opportunity to have an exchange with IEG's Director-General and Senior Vice President. Panelists will discuss the role of the World Bank Groups Independent Evaluation Group and invite questions from CSOs.

Participant List 

 

13:30 – 14:30

TIF
 Hall C

What Will It Take?  Restoring Growth, Spreading Prosperity in Times of Crisis

 

Sponsor:  Wall Street Journal

 

Panelists:  Jim Yong Kim (WB President), Jake Schlesinger  (Japan Editor-in-Chief, Wall Street Journal)

 

World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim participates in a discussion about key development challenges around the globe and on the Bank’s recently launched poverty eradication initiative “Whatwillittake”.  The session is hosted by the Wall Street Journal as part of their The Big Interview online video series.

 

 

 

 14:30 – 16:00
TIF
 Hall: D1

Youth Unemployment

Sponsors: Plan International, World Bank

Panelists:  Armida Alisjahbana (Minister of National Development Planning, Indonesia), Peter van der Pols (Partner, DeCarpo), Kazuo Tsurumi (Executive Managing and National Director, Plan Japan), Tjipke Bergsma (Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Plan International), Arup Banerji (Director for Social Protection & Labor, World Bank),  Tariq Sewbaransingh (Representative, Youth in Action, Netherlands), Resa Aprianengsich Syahniezt (Youth representative, Indonesia)

Youth unemployment is one of the most pressing issues of current times. Across the globe 75 million youth are currently unemployed and it is expected that more than a billion new youth will enter the workforce over the next decade. Most live in developing countries and their prospects are not promising. The International Labour Organization (ILO) warns that if the unemployment trend is not reversed there is a risk of a ‘lost generation’ of disenfranchised youth.

This session explores the issue of youth unemployment from different angles starting with the scope of the problem and why it matters. Representatives from governments, the World Bank and private sector will share information about what is currently being done and what is working from their perspective. Youth need to be part of the solution so we will also hear what the issue means to them and how they are responding. All will be challenged to identify what more can be done to reverse the trend of youth unemployment.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered
 

Participant List  

Presentation:

14:30 - 16:00
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 251

From Country Systems to DPLs: Understanding the World Bank’s Approach to Social and Environmental Risk Assessment

Sponsors: Global Witness, Bank Information Center (BIC), AKSI

Panelists: Vince McElhinny (Bank Information Center), Rick Jacobsen (Global Witness), Titi Soentoro (AKSI), Stephen Lintner (World Bank), CHAIR: TBC

Proper risk assessment and management are critical to achieving intended development results. The World Bank’s approach to risk assessment and management varies depending on the lending instrument and is currently evolving in the case of Investment Lending.  The Bank began revising its risk assessment approach to Investment Lending in 2010 in order to consider risks more comprehensively and better support implementation and target results.  This shift is expected to expand to cover other instruments such as Development Policy Loans (DPLs) and Program for Results (P4R).

This session will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Bank’s approaches with respect to different financial instruments and evaluate the challenges of ensuring coherence in environmental and social sustainability outcomes across instruments.  It will examine specific examples from traditional Investment Lending, including Use of Country Systems and Financial Intermediary projects, as well as programmatic, sector-wide lending through DPLs and P4Rs. It will also discuss the Bank’s recently adopted risk-based approach - the Operational Risk Assessment Framework - and its implications for the upcoming Safeguards Review.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

Presentations:

 

14:30 – 16:00
TIF / CSO CENTER
 Room 253

IMF Consultation Meeting on Engagement with Civil Society: Review and Way Forward

Sponsor: International Monetary Fund

Panelists: Jo Marie Griesgraber (Executive Director, New Rules for Global Finance), Jan Aart Scholte (Professor, University of Warwick) CHAIR: Karla Chaman (Head, Civil Society Team, IMF)

Civil society representatives are now more vocal than the past and their influence expands to parliaments and governments of their countries, especially in industrialized nations. Therefore, the international organizations are paying increasing attention to CSOs voices and adjusting their engagement plans accordingly. In the upcoming months, the IMF will begin the revision of the Fund’s “Guide for Staff Relations with Civil Society Organizations (CSOs),” which provides recommendations on how to engage with civil society. The existing Fund guide, prepared in 2006, provides the staff with general principles on how to engage with CSOs; however, it lacks recommendations for institutional procedures like consultation processes. The guide needs to be updated and expanded. This session aims to gather CSO views, suggestions, and concerns on how to improve the current guidelines, including IMF consultation processes on policies, strategies, and Art. IV consultations.

Participant List

 

16:00 - 17:30
TIF/CSO CENTER
 Room: 253 

Leveraging CSO - Government Collaboration to Empower the Poor

Sponsor: Voices of the Poor Group, World Bank

Panelists: Baquer Namazi (Voices of the Poor Group), Sheela Patel (Chair, Slum Dwellers International), John Garrison (World Bank), Nobuhiko Katayama (National Director, World Vision Japan)

All stakeholders – governments, business sector and civil society – and the rich and poor must work together to respond to the common human threat. We need new narratives, new development paradigms, and new pro-poor resource allocation mechanisms to be able to respond effectively to common challenges. The World Bank, an institution with the proclaimed goal of creating a world free from poverty, has a major role to play. It is governed by state shareholders with diverse political and economic systems. The Bank has produced considerable policy statements on centrality of people in development management. Yet, in practice there is often a gap between rhetoric and practice. Major decisions that get through the decision making process are basically government-centered. The evolving relationship of the Bank with CSOs shows a trend moving from confrontation to cooperation. Where the Bank has given space to CSOs, protesters have joined the discourse and are making rich contributions based on their comparative advantage and affinities with communities.

The developing world, particularly countries of the South East Asia have now people based social movements with memberships in the millions. Drawing on visions and creativity and people power of the poor communities, these social movements, such as SDI and SEWA in India and BRAC in Bangladesh, have succeeded in putting in place large scale community based programs that have proved sustainable and cost effective. Most important these programs have created an enormous reservoir of social capital, solidarity and legitimacy. Where local state authorities have facilitated space for community decision making and accorded respect and understanding of the partnership potentials of CBOs, affinities have deepened and state legitimacy has been enhanced and potential conflict and violence averted.

This session will discuss the challenges, opportunities, good practices, and role of stakeholders in promoting government – civil society - community collaboration. In addition participants will be invited to deepen the discourse and suggest concrete steps for moving the agenda forward.

Participant List

Presentation:

Summary Note

 

 

 16:00 - 17:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
 Room:  251

Beyond HIPC - Towards a Fair and Transparent Debt Workout Mechanism

Sponsors: erlassjahr.de, EURODAD, AFRODAD, EED, Jubilee USA, SLUG Norway, South Centre, 11.11.11 Belgium

Panelists: Heikki Holmås (Minister of Development Norway), Ludger Schuknecht (Department Head, Ministry of Finance Germany), Øygunn Brynnildsen (EURODAD), Yuefen Li (UNCTAD Debt and Development Branch), Martin Khor (South Centre), CHAIR: Eric LeCompte (JubileeUSA).

The looming sovereign debt crisis in the Eurozone has revived debates around a comprehensive and fair mechanism for resolving sovereign debt crises. However, not only are industrialized countries in Europe suffering from high debt indicators, so are  small island developing states (SIDS) and even some post-completion point HIPC countries.  A broad range of proposals for sovereign “insolvency” mechanisms have been proposed over recent years, from the IMF's SDRM and CSO proposals for ad hoc arbitration on debt, to proposals from academia for a standing debt court. Progress, however, has been limited, not due to a lack of urgency or of soundness of the various policy proposals, but because political debates have not yet led to a coherent and focused reform process.

This session will encourage an exchange of views among representatives from government, civil society, and the private sector regarding the implementation of reform proposals. The discussion will focus on the political process, its challenges and next steps, as well as on the substance of the various proposals for a fair and transparent debt workout mechanism.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

 

16:00 - 17:30
TIF
 Hall: D1

How Natural Capital Accounting and Innovative Financing Mechanisms Can Achieve Aichi Biodiversity Target No.20?

Sponsors: Earth Summit 2012 Japan, CEPA Japan

Panelists: Tetsu Hattori (Director of Earth Summit 2012 Japan), Masahiro Sato (Associate Professor, Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University), Takashi Hongo (Mitsui Global Strategic Studies Institute), Dr. Masaru Yarime (Associate Professor Graduate Program in Sustainability Science, University of Tokyo), Yoichi Mori (Vice-chair for Sustainability information Disclosure, Japanese Institute of Certified Public Accountants)

This session will overview and discuss proposals of practical strategies for biodiversity conservation at the national, corporate, projects, and products & services levels to achieve Aichi Biodiversity Target No.20.  The panelists will overview ideas of natural capital accounting and innovative financing mechanisms geared to: protecting biodiversity at the national level; provided integrated report and sustainability information disclosure at the corporate level; finance guidelines for finance sector and offset programs at the project level (for business sector); and to  change consumption and  lead consumers to shift to a more natural friendly lifestyle (for consumers), including the difficulty of inducing a "fair discount rate"?

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List 

Presentations: 

16:45 PM - 6:00

Hotel Okura Heian

PROGRAM OF SEMINAR SESSION:  Global Health 2: Universal Health Coverage – Opportunities and Lessons 

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists:  Keizo Takemi (Senior Fellow at the Japan Center for International Exchange / JCIE),  Nisha Agrawal  (Chief Executive Officer, OxFam India), Margaret Chan (Director General, World Health Organization), CHAIR:   Richard Horton (Editor-in-Chief, The Lancet)

Most developing countries aspire to attain universal health coverage, while those countries that have attained universal coverage face challenges in sustaining it amidst mitigating fiscal and country competitiveness risks. The challenges of expanding and maintaining health coverage have become greater during the financial crisis. National leaders are increasingly being reminded by their citizens to exercise strong leadership and political commitment, ensure greater accountability and be more strategic in making better use of the limited resources so that the people's wellbeing can be achieved. This session will focus on how countries across the globe (including Japan) have achieved, or are making progress in improving health coverage in an inclusive and fiscally sustainable manner in the face of a very difficult financial and political environment. The panel will discuss the various perceived benefits and risks of Universal Health Coverage (UHC) among the different stakeholders, and the lessons learned from countries that have achieved and are sustaining UHC.

 

Key questions to be addressed will include:

·         What are the driving forces (including leadership) behind a country's decision to commit to Universal Health Coverage? Are they economic, political, or social? Are these forces linked to the country's perspective on the importance of people's health and wellbeing as an integral part of development agenda?

·         What are some of the major political challenges in setting Universal Health Coverage as a goal, and how have countries/political leaders managed to overcome them? What are the perceived benefits and risks of UHC among the key stakeholders - national government, civil society, business leaders and professional groups - and how are these different interests being addressed?

·         What is viewed as the Government's role in promoting and implementing programs for UHC? What is the role of the private sector and how can it contribute to the UHC goals?

·         How can the global community support and encourage country leaders in pursuing UHC and promote exchange of knowledge and experiences to help countries strengthen their UHC strategies?

·         How are countries managing to find fiscal space and balancing trade-offs within the existing fiscal constraints? 

 

 

 

 18:00  - 19:30
TIF
 Hall: B5

Civil Society Townhall Meeting

Sponsors:  International Monetary Fund, World Bank Group

Panelists: Christine Lagarde (Managing Director, IMF), Jim Yong Kim (President,WBG),  CSO Chair (TBD), and two CSO Discussants (TBD)

This townhall is for CSO representatives accredited to the Annual Meetings.  The CSO Discussants will make initial remarks on Fund and Bank policies, to be followed by comments from Mr. Kim and Ms.Lagarde.  This will be followed by a general discussion on issues of concern to CSO representatives.

* Interpretation will be offered in English, Japanese, French, and Spanish


 

 19:15  - 20:30
TIF
Outside Hall B5

Civil Society Reception

Sponsors:  International Monetary Fund, World Bank

The event will be hosted by Gerry Rice (Acting Director of the External Relations Department, IMF) and Cyril Muller (Vice President for External Affairs,  World Bank).

 

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Friday, October 12

9:00 - 10:30
TIF/CSO CENTER
Room: 253

Environmental Flows and Downstream Impacts: The Bank's Record and Lessons for the Safeguards Review

Sponsors:  International Rivers, World Resources Institute (WRI)

Panelists: Khanh Nguy Thi (Green ID, Vietnam), Satomi Higashi (Mekong Watch, Japan), Stephen Lintner (World Bank), CHAIR: Zachary Hurwitz (International Rivers)

Environmental flows, largely defined as a river's flow regime, provide valuable ecosystem services to livelihoods and freshwater biodiversity.  Dams modify flow regimes, which can present great risks to river ecosystems and their users.  Meanwhile, climate change is reducing the flow regime in some river basins, placing greater strain on water demand.  The World Bank has renewed its commitment to dams, especially to large, multipurpose storage.  How can the Bank successfully balance its goals and a commitment to protecting e-flows and avoiding downstream impacts?

The panel will examine the Bank's record using a number of case studies, and will discuss how the Bank can strengthen its commitment to protecting environmental flows during the Safeguards Review.

Participant List 

Presentations:

9:00 - 10:30
TIF/ CSO CENTER
 Room: 251

Creating Opportunities for Youth Employment

Sponsor: Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) / World Bank Group

Panelists: Emmanuel Jimenez (Director Public Sector Evaluation, IEG),
Arup Banerji (Sector Director, HDNSP, World Bank), Steen Jorgensen (Sector Director, MNSHD, World Bank), Fadhil Bakeer Markar (Connect Lanka, Sri Lanka), CHAIR: Delores MchLaughlin (Senior Advisor, Plan International)

IEG’s recently disclosed evaluation – World Bank and IFC Support for Youth Employment Programs - will stimulate a lively discussion on potential solutions for the global issue of  youth employment which is a major concern for many countries.  Youth unemployment may negatively affect the welfare of young people,  economic performance, and social stability.

The World Bank Group’s support for youth employment is relatively small. Evidence on what works in youth employment is scarce.  In this session, IEG’s evaluation will catalyze a discussion on what the Bank Group, the development community, governments, the private sector, and other stakeholders can do to generate opportunities for youth employment.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List 

Presentation:

9:00 - 10:30
TIF
Hall D1 

Role of the IMF on Low-income Countries: Results of the Facilities and Conditionality Review

Sponsor:  IMF

Panelists: Hugh Bredenkamp (Deputy Director for Strategy, Policy, and Review Department, IMF), Nuria Molina (Director of Policy & Research, Save the Children UK), Elizabeth Stuart (Washington Program Director, Oxfam International), CHAIR: Karla Chaman (Head of Civil Society Team, IMF)

The session will provide a platform to discuss the work done by the IMF in low-income countries (LICs), and especially to provide an update on the results of the latest reviews of both the Fund Facilities and Conditionalities for low-income countries (LICs). On the Facilities review, the different products that respond to the financial needs of the LICs were assessed. On the Conditionality review, the assessment focused not only on content and application of conditionalities, but also broader issues such as design, implementation, and program outcomes. The funding for the Poverty and Growth Trust (PRGT) for LICs will be also addressed. CSO commentators will provide their views regarding the latest update of IMF work on low-income countries.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List 

 

 11:00 – 12:30
TIF/CSO CENTER
Room: 251

Post-Disaster Environmental Recovery

Sponsors:  OISCA International

Panelists: Masatoshi Sato (Chairman, KEIDANREN Committee on Nature Conservation), Kunihiro Seido (Ex-Executive Director, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Yamanashi Prefecture),Takehiko Ohta (Professor Emeritus, the University of Tokyo), Ryo Kanayama (Senior Vice President, Walmart/Seiyu), Eiji Suzuki (President, Association of Costal Forest Restoration in Natori City, Miyagi Prefecture), CHAIR: Yoshihiko Kono (Ex- Executive Board Member, Japan Bank for International Cooperation)

During the East Japan Great Earthquake, many coastal forests were severely damaged. The restoration of coastal forests is an important task for Japan. CSOs, private companies, and citizens are working together and complementing government action to promote forest restoration.  This session will include a discussion of the challenges being faced by Japanese CSOs and share lessons learned for future disaster-prevention measures in Japan and other countries.

                            * Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List 

Presentations:

 

 11:00 – 12:30
TIF/CSO CENTER
Room: 253

Doing Business Report Rankings

Sponsors: CAFOD, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), Bretton Woods Project, Center of Concern

Panelists: Bin Han (Alternate WB Executive Director for China), Peter Bakvis (ITUC), Geoffrey Chongo (Jesuit Center for Theological Reflection, Zambia), Augusto Lopez-Claros (IFC / World Bank)

The Doing Business Rankings are one of the best-selling and most hotly debated publications of the World Bank. They tackle the important topic of how to guide countries to create a better enabling environment for business. Whilst some topics seem uncontroversial – who would argue that new businesses should face long and complex registration procedures – they are increasingly criticised as irrelevant for the majority of businesses and the economic development prospects especially of poor countries.  They are also seen as harmful in critical areas such as tax, land and labour; and for discouraging discussion of what is the right kind of regulation for broader policy objectives.

This session will bring together experts from labour, development and business organizations to highlight issues and perspectives that need to be part of the review of these influential rankings. 

Participant List 

Presentations:

 

 11:00 - 13:00
TIF
Hall: D1

Facilitating International Adjustment Through Timely Debt Resolution

Sponsors: United Nations Department for Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA), Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), Canada

Panelists:  Dr. Shamshad Akhtar (Assistant Secretary General, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations), Jose Antonio Ocampo (Professor of Professional Practice in International and Public Affairs, Columbia University), Sergei Storchak (Deputy Finance Minister, Russian Federation),  Barry Eichengreen (Professor of Economics and Political Science, University of California, Berkeley), Willem Buiter (Chief Economist, Citigroup),  Robert Gray (Chairman, Debt Financing & Advisory Group, HSBC Bank), Amar Bhattacharya (Director of the Secretariat, Intergovernmental Group of Twenty-Four on International, IMF), CHAIR: Benu Schneider (Chief of Debt, Finance, and Systematic Issues Unit, UNDESA)

This session will bring the perspectives of finance ministers, policy makers, and academics on the need to ensure timely, effective international adjustment in a manner consistent with sustained global growth and continued adherence to the system of open, dynamic international trade and payments constructed over the past 65 years. The global financial and economic crisis has underscored the need for exchange rate and fiscal adjustment as well as measures to enhance labour market flexibility. The panel's starting point, however, is the recognition that, in a world of capital account liberalization, effective, timely external adjustment entails the possibility of sovereign debt restructuring.

This issue is central to the role of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in assisting its members strike a judicious balance between financing and adjustment. The danger is that, faced with the prospect of draconian fiscal adjustment or disorderly default, governments will prevaricate, increasing the eventual costs of adjustment to debtor country citizens as painful but necessary adjustments are deferred. Private creditors, whose asset values will deteriorate through the subordination of their claims, may also be made worse off. In this situation, the IMF experiences a potential loss of credibility and legitimacy, as its members are ultimately required to undertake painful adjustments that are inconsistent with the Fund’s basic mandate.

Panelist will explore the calculus of economic and political factors influencing debt default decisions to assess the extent to which voluntary or statutory rules-based approaches can contribute to an orderly and timely framework for the restructuring of claims that reduces costs to debtors and private creditors alike. Key questions are whether steps can be taken to improve upon the prevailing ad hoc, voluntary approach that has dominated the restructuring of sovereign debt over the past decade, or whether a more formal system for dealing with situations of fundamentally unsustainable debts is needed.

                   * Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

 

11:30 - 13:00

Hotel Okura Heian

PROGRAM OF SEMINAR SESSION:  Can Government Policies Lead to Good Jobs for Development? 

Sponsor: Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), World Bank

Panelists:  Akihiko Tanaka (President, JICA),  Laura Alfaro (Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School, United States), Newai Gebre-Ab (Chief Economic Advisor to the Prime Minister, Ethiopia), Mahabub Hossain (Executive Director, BRAC, Bangladesh), Yasuyuki Sawada (Professor of Economics, Graduate School of Economics, University of Tokyo), CHAIR:  Hafez Ghanem (Brookings Institute, United States)

 

For the last 30 years, despite rapid economic growth, several Asian countries still face economic disparities, which may block their road to sustainable development. The developing world's challenge is not just how to achieve growth, but how to achieve inclusive growth.

 

Jobs are hugely important to this challenge, as they serve as the linchpin connecting living standards, productivity, and social cohesion - all vital factors for achieving inclusive growth. Countries differ in the job-creation possibilities realistically available to them at any particular point in time. For example, Mexico and Korea 30 years ago were at roughly the same stage of development. Yet, based on differences in demographics, investments, policies, and a host of other factors, each country's outlook on jobs today is drastically different. Therefore, it's easy to see that jobs agendas are country and context specific.

 

Teasing out how policies might affect job creation, especially in low-income countries, is a particularly interesting challenge. This session will draw on experiences from across regions to shed new light on the interactions between jobs (creation as one perspective) and inclusive development.

 

Key issues to be addressed will include:  

·         Can jobs be a medium for more inclusive and sustainable growth in agrarian economies and what policy measures can improve the development impact of jobs?

·         How can policies contribute to job creation and inclusive growth through value chain development?

·         What does the private sector think the role of public policies should be vis-a-vis job creation?

 

12:30 - 14:00
TIF/CSO CENTER
Room: 251

Donor Perspectives on Myanmar’s Economic Transitions

Sponsors:  Bank Information Center (BIC),  Burma Partnership,  Mekong Watch,  Burma Information Network

Panelists:  Dr. Thein Shwe ( Professor, Chiang Mai University, Former official at Myanmar’s Finance Ministry), Khin Ohmar (Coordinator, Burma Partnership), Kunio Senga (Director General, Southeast Asia Department, Asian Development Bank), Annete Dixon (Country Director for Myanmar, World Bank)

As Myanmar embarks on socioeconomic and political reforms, the international aid community has begun re-engaging and has renewed support for economic reconstruction and development. Donor countries raised their aid pledges, with some governments waiving their trade and investment restrictions. Meanwhile, bilateral and multilateral development agencies increased their staff presence, re-established country missions, and designed interim assistance strategies to deepen re-engagement.

This session is timely as the World Bank Group and Asian Development Bank are near the final stage in writing their Interim Strategy Note (ISN) and Interim Country Partnership Strategy (ICSP), respectively, in Myanmar. Last April, the Government of Japan announced a review of its Overseas Development Aid (ODA) policy towards Myanmar and outlined its projected economic cooperation with the government in addition to plans to address debt issues, support to ethnic minorities and national races, and establish one special economic zone. Such plans in part evolve from the institutions’ economic assessments and what they consider as their roles and comparative advantage in helping move the transitions forward.


As such, the discussion will focus on the challenges (fiscal, trade, and investment policies as the government signals a shift from centrally-directed economy to market-oriented reforms), priorities (donor agency medium term strategic priorities),  donor coordination ( how can donors increase coordination, and what lessons from operations in other post-conflict economies apply in Myanmar), and public participation (what is the progress (if any) in the engagement strategy of donors with non-state actors including the ethnic, civil society and labor communities during re-engagement and normal operations phases). 

Participant List

Presentation:

 12:30 - 14:00
TIF
Room: 701

Investing in Health: for Whom?

Sponsors:  Japan CSO Network on Global Health, Civil Society Consultative Group on Health, Nutrition, and Population, Oxfam, Save the Children, Results, World bank

Panelists: Samura Kamara (Minister of Finance and Development, Siera Leone), Liz Stuart (Head of Washington DC Office, Oxfam International) Nicole Klingen (Acting Director for HNP, World Bank), Samson Kironde (Co-chairperson, Health Systems Action Network, Uganda), CHAIR: Aiko Doden (Senior Commentator (NHK)   

The economic crises of recent years have severely depleted the political will and public financial resources for poverty reduction and global health. The new discourse that is dominating the development scene instead is “inclusive growth”, and it seems as though the pros and cons of investing in health seem to be discussed against the extent to which health is a contributor to such growth.  While it is critical that the development community and finance ministers duly place health at the heart of growth strategies, the implication of such a drive on the rights of the poorest and marginalized populations to access quality healthcare is not yet clear.

This session will elicit the perspectives of national governments, World Bank, and civil society on the impacts of the crisis on health advocacy and the opportunities and risks associated with the inclusive growth agenda.  Panelists will also discuss a vision of health services that aim for a rights-fulfilling “inclusive growth” model, and how to overcome potential trade-offs between cost-related constraints and fulfilling rights.

                 * Japanese language interpretation will be offered

13:00 - 14:00

TIF

Hall C

BBC WORLD DEBATE - Rescuing the Global Economy: What Needs to be Done? 

Sponsor:  British Broadcasting Company (BBC) 

Panelists: Christine Lagarde (Managing Director, IMF), Peter Orszag (Vice Chairman, Global Banking, Citigroup, United States), Wolfgang Schäuble (Federal Minister of Finance, Germany), CHAIR: Nik Gowing (BBC News)

 

 

The global recovery has suffered more setbacks and risks remain high. Growth has disappointed around the globe in 2012. A key reason appears to be that policies in major economies are not sufficiently rebuilding confidence and uncertainty continues. The euro area economy contracted as the crisis intensified; while activity decelerated too in other major advanced economies (e.g., the United Kingdom and United States), as fiscal consolidation proceeds and balance sheets are also being repaired. Major emerging economies have not been immune to slower growth. Notably, China, Brazil and India have slowed - reflecting not only external weakness but home-grown problems. What will it take to get the global recovery back on track? The debate will focus on policy requisites and global action to end the crisis, boost recovery and rebalance growth.

 

Key questions to be addressed include:

·         Is the world economy going through another "soft patch" or headed towards a deeper downturn? Are policy mistakes or inaction mainly to blame?

·         What specific policies in advanced and emerging economies are needed now to reignite recovery? Who needs to do more or change course? With unemployment stubbornly high in many corners, how can we translate economic growth into concrete gains for people on the street?

·         What are the major risks at this juncture? Can domestic political constraints be overcome to make the necessary policy choices that can address the challenges the world economy is facing now? In Europe, what will it take to get ahead of the crisis and allay fears about the euro's future? Can the U.S. effectively manage its "fiscal cliff" and raising the debt ceiling? What are the prospects for agreement on a credible U.S. medium-term fiscal roadmap after the elections?

·         Can emerging market countries achieve a soft landing or are they headed for more serious problems of their own? How worrisome are higher food prices and inflation; and what challenges do they present?

·         At the global level, can countries cooperate/coordinate on policies better to boost recovery and rebalance growth?

 

 

* This session will be broadcast (at a later date); audience members should be in their seats no later than 12:45 p.m/ when the doors will close.

 

 

  

14:00 – 15:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 253

IMF Consultation Meeting on Engagement with Civil Society: Review and Way Forward

Sponsor:  International Monetary Fund

Panelists: Jo Marie Griesgraber (Executive Director, New Rules for Global Finance), Jan Aart Scholte (Professor, University of Warwick) CHAIR: Karla Chaman (Head, Civil Society Team, IMF)

Civil society representatives are now more vocal than the past and their influence expands to parliaments and governments of their countries, especially in industrialized nations. Therefore, the international organizations are paying increasing attention to CSOs voices and adjusting their engagement plans accordingly. In the upcoming months, the IMF will begin the revision of the Fund’s “Guide for Staff Relations with Civil Society Organizations (CSOs),” which provides recommendations on how to engage with civil society. The existing Fund guide, prepared in 2006, provides the staff with general principles on how to engage with CSOs; however, it lacks recommendations for institutional procedures like consultation processes. The guide needs to be updated and expanded. This session aims to gather CSO views, suggestions, and concerns on how to improve the current guidelines, including IMF consultation processes on policies, strategies, and Art. IV consultations.


 

 14:00 – 15:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 251

Citizen-Led Accountability at the World Bank Group: Experiences of Independent Recourse Mechanisms

Sponsors: Inspection Panel (WB), Compliance Adviser and Ombudsman (IFC)

Panelists: Alf Jerve (Chair of the World Bank Inspection Panel), Meg Taylor (Vice President and Compliance Advisor Ombudsman for IFC and MIGA, World Bank Group), Chad Dobson (Executive Director, Bank Information Center)

The 1990s saw creation and further proliferation of independent accountability and recourse mechanisms with the IFIs, with the World Bank Group being a pioneer in this field. The World Bank Board of Directors established the Inspection Panel in 1993 with a mandate to address complaints of people negatively affected by the projects funded by IBRD and IDA. The Compliance Advisor Ombudsman (CAO) was established in 1999 to address concerns of individuals and communities affected by the private sector operations of the WBG, namely those supported by IFC and MIGA.

 

The key mission of these mechanisms reflects the principle of citizen-led accountability, and they are designed specifically to give voice and right of recourse to people with respect to actions that affect them. Another important goal is to ensure that the World Bank Group policies and procedures are complied with by the institution.

 

The session will provide an overview of the Inspection Panel and CAO, and will discuss their processes, trends and lessons learnt since their establishment. This session would be of particular interest to CSOs and other development practitioners interested in issues of bottom-up accountability of IFIs, and ways of providing recourse and redress for project affected people. 

 

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

 

Participant List  

 

Presentations:

 

14:00 - 15:30
TIF / CSO CENTER Room: 701

Universal Health Coverage: What, Why, and How?

Sponsors:  Japan CSO Network on Global Health, Civil Society Consultative Group on Health, Nutrition, and Population, Oxfam, Save the Children, Results, World Bank

Panelists:  Dr. Rob Yates (Senior Health Economist, World Health Organization), John Mahama (Coordinator, People's Health Movement, Ghana), Simon Wright (Head of Child Survival, Save the Children UK), Dr. Arata Kochi (Former WHO Director for STOP TB,HIV/AIDS, Global Malaria Programme), CHAIR: Masaki Inaba (Programme Coordinator, Executive Director, G-CAP Japan)  

Universal health coverage (UHC) is quickly gaining visibility in the global health agenda, and is indeed one of the themes of the Annual Meetings this year. The World Health Organization states that UHC is when all people have access to health services without fear of falling into poverty. However, there seems to be confusion of what it actually means as an increasing number of stakeholders begin to reference this term. As devils are often in the details, the question of how to approach the UHC agenda is of strategic importance for civil society health strategy. While the focus of the international financial institutions will inevitably be on financial dimensions, civil society needs a rights-based vision of UHC in which to locate the financial question.

This session will address an optimal vision of universal health coverage and the approach the civil society should take with a view to influencing the post-2015 development framework. Panelists will also discuss the experiences and lessons of countries which have made meaningful strides in expanding health coverage, the proactive engagement of the community as change agents, and the related impacts with the existing MDGs.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

 

14:00 - 15:30
TIF
Hall: D1

The Road to 2015: Africa Accessing Global Finance for Infrastructure Development

Sponsors: Africa Business Roundtable, ONE

Panelists: Donald Kaberuka (President, African Development Bank), Jean-Louis Ekra (President, African Export Import Bank), Edith Jibunoh  (Director, Multilateral Institution, ONE), Kadré Désiré Ouedraogo (President, ECOWAS Commission), Sanusi Lamido Sanusi (Governor, Central Bank of Nigeria), Bisi Onasanya (Group Managing Director/CEO, First Bank of Nigeria)

As the countdown to the 2015 date for meeting the Millennium Development Goals begins, Heads of State and Governments across the globe have expressed deep concern that progress made so far falls short of what is need. At the heart of this problem is the need to mobilize and retain global capital flows. This is particularly true for many African Countries where domestic resources mobilization has proven to be inadequate in financing both investment and development needs. That clearly suggests that for most African economies, their economic difficulty on the road to 2015 is bound to grow in complexity and intensity, which explains why many of them are lagging behind or totally off track on the MDG’s drive.

Thankfully, some encouraging initiatives are emerging from Africa, its development partners, and the International business community, to address this issues but the challenge now is to strengthen these initiatives and crystallize them for effectiveness with a view to redirecting a major share of global investments, trade and capital flows, as well as development finance to Africa.  The complexities involved here directly suggest that policy makers and business executives must work together and more importantly, do a rethink of the effectiveness of traditional instruments in this regard. How can we come up with innovative financing mechanisms and make them work for Africa? How can African Businesses increase their participation in the global economic system? What is the way forward for Africa to access global finance?

This high-level roundtable will build on the previous work done by OSAA, the MDG steering committee for Africa, and other organizations and provide an opportunity to move the discussion forward. The discussion is expected to focus on the following issues: establishing a global framework for mobilizing international resources for financing the MDGS in West Africa; review of progress made in implementing the recommendations of previous initiatives, including the Commission on Capital Flows to Africa; identification of the main barriers to investment in Africa; identification of the main steps to attract foreign capital and encourage private sector to invest in West Africa; creation of partnerships between African private sector and foreign private sector; identification of success stories and innovative approaches; discussion on how to improve Africa’s image as an attractive investment destination; and long term strategy for increasing capital flows to West Africa.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

 

 16:00 – 17:30
TIF/ CSO CENTER
 Room:  251

Achieving Improved Health through Social Accountability Initiatives

Sponsors:  World Vision Japan, World Bank

Panelists: Dr. Lynn Freedman (Professor, Columbia University), Dr. Fletcher Tembo (Research Fellow, Overseas Development Institute), Rudo Kwaramba (Southern Africa Regional Leader, World Vision), Mr. Steen Jorgensen (Sector Director,  World Bank), Dr. Shiro Konuma (Director, Global Health Policy Division, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan) CHAIR: Mr. Jeff Hall (World Vision)

This panel discussion will focus on the relationship between social accountability and better health governance and outcomes. Panelists will explore the theory of change which connects increased civic engagement with better health.  We will also examine compelling evidence from impact evaluations demonstrating the effectiveness of social accountability approaches.  For example, one such evaluation demonstrated a 33% drop in under-five child mortality as a result of these approaches. 

World Vision will contribute an overview of its experience scaling its social accountability approach to over 200 programs in 29 countries.  We will explore how these programs have contributed to improve maternal and child health. In light of this theory and practice, we will hear from the World Bank about the new Partnership Facility and the reasons the Bank has taken this step.  Finally, a representative of the government of Japan will describe the Japanese government’s perspective on demand-led governance more generally.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List 

Presentations:

 16:00 – 17:30
TIF 
 Hall: D1

The Role of the Post-2015 Framework in Addressing Worsening Inequality

Sponsors: Save the Children / UK

Panelists: Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala (Minister of Finance, Nigeria), Otaviano Canuto (Vice President, World Bank), Jessica Espey (Senior Researcher, Save the Children), CO-CHAIRS: Heidi Hautala (Minister for International Development, Finland), Nuria Molina (Director of Policy and Research, Save the Children)

During this panel discussion and the subsequent debate we will explore new evidence on the nature of within country inequalities based on income, consumption, age, and gender. A new report from Save the Children will show the particular effects of these different forms of inequality for future generations. Several speakers will unpack the specific inequalities affecting their country and tease out the implications of this for national development, now and in the future.

This session will focus on identifying the forms of inequality that need due consideration in the post-2015 development framework. It will also address ways to measure different forms of inequality and highlight successful policy responses from across a range of countries.

           * Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List 

Presentations:

 

16:00 – 17:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
 Room: 253

Youth, Asia, and the Role of the IMF

Sponsor:  International Monetary Fund

Panelists: Anthony Annett (External Relations Department, IMF) Karla Chaman (Head of Civil Society Team, IMF)

This is a follow up session on the Youth Dialogue with IMF DMD Nemat Shafik, in which youth representatives can discuss some issues that were not addressed in the dialogue or that need more in-depth analysis. Japanese finalists of the IMF essay contest, as well as students from universities in China, Korea, Thailand, and Singapore will present their views, concerns, and suggestions in a dynamic and energetic discussion.

Participant List 

Presentations:

16:00 - 18:30
Tokyo Kaikan Hotel - Gold Room
(Two blocks from TIF)

Promoting Development through Trust Funds: Japan's Frontier Role

Sponsors: PHRD, JSDF

Panelists: Nobumitsu Hayashi (President, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance, Japan), Axel van Trotsenburg (Vice President, Concessional Finance and Global Partnerships, World Bank), Michael Koch (Director, Global Partnerships and Trust Fund Operations, World Bank), Roberto Tarallo (Manager, Global Partnerships and Trust Fund Operations, World Bank), Hironobu Shibuya (CEO, Save the Children Japan), Arvind Kumar Choudhary (CEO, Bihar Rural Livelihood Promotion Society, Government of India), Nani Zulminarni (National Coordinator, Women-headed Household Empowerment Program, Indonesia), Sujana Royat (Deputy Coordinating Minister for People’s Welfare, Government of Indonesia)

A panel will discuss how two prominent Japanese trust funds — the  Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) and the Japan Policy and Human Resources Fund (PHRD) — established and financed by the government of Japan and administered by the World Bank, have yielded significant development results through a wide range of cutting-edge activities over more than two decades of partnership.  The session will be followed by the launch of a book entitled “A Call to Dignity: How Indonesia’s Women-Headed Household Empowerment Program (PEKKA) is Transforming Lives and Changing Development Paradigms.”

*RSVP required by Oct. 10, 2012: TokyoEvent@worldbank.org

 

16:15  - 17:45

Hotel Okura Heian

PROGRAM OF SEMINAR SESSION: Avoiding A Lost Generation: The Challenges and Opportunities for Expanding Youth Employment 

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists:  Tjipke Bergsma (Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Plan International, United Kingdom), Heikki Holmås (Minister of International Development, Norway), Kathy Matsui  (Chief Japan Equity Strategist and Co-head of Asia Investment Research, Goldman Sachs), CHAIR: Zanny Minton-Beddoes (Economics Editor, The Economist, United States)

 

 

The global economic downturn has led to soaring youth unemployment in many parts of the developed and developing world - in some countries higher than 50 percent. The majority of the 200 million unemployed adults looking for work worldwide are young people. Frustrated, educated but un- or under-employed young people were at the forefront of last year's Arab Spring revolutions, Occupy Wall Street, and elsewhere, and youth bulges in many developing countries, particularly in the Middle East and Africa, threaten to worsen the problem in the near future. If the issue is not addressed soon, many countries face a "lost generation" of discouraged young workers that could lead to years of low productivity, low earnings, slower growth, and social unrest. This session will examine the main factors, development impacts, and potential solutions to the growing youth employment crisis.

 

Key questions to be addressed will include:

·         What are some successful examples of governments and communities helping young people transition into the formal labor market?

·         What are the roles and incentives for the for-profit private sector to create more job opportunities for young people? Not-for-profits?

·         What are the skills that young people need most in today's changing job market, and are these best learned in or out of formal school settings?

·         How can the international community best support countries in expanding opportunities for youth employment?

 

top 

Saturday, October 13

9:00 - 10:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 253

Think Tanks:  Promoting Local Solutions, Influencing Global Thinking

Sponsors:  International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

Panelists: Prof. Debapriya Bhattacharya (Centre for Policy Dialogue / CPD, Bangladesh), Prof. Samuel Wangwe (Policy Research for Development / REPOA, Tanzania), Andrea Ordóñez (Grupo FARO, Ecuador), CHAIR: Dr. Peter Taylor (IDRC)

As knowledge generators and analyzers of local challenges, independent policy research organizations or “think tanks” are well-positioned to inform and strengthen national policies and practices, leading to a positive impact on society. As key civil society actors in the global South, think tanks can also contribute to global debates, for example helping to shape a post-MDG agenda, or by participating in the development of country-level and regional goals and targets that feed into global development goals.

This session brings together representatives of three leading policy research organizations from Bangladesh, Tanzania and Ecuador, to share their experiences and analysis of the potential of think tanks to promote local solutions and influence global thinking.  All three organizations are part of the Think Tank Initiative, a multi-donor program dedicated to strengthening think tanks in developing countries. The vision of the Think Tank Initiative is that policymakers in participating countries consistently use objective, high-quality research to develop and implement policies that lead to more equitable and prosperous societies. Drawing on extensive practical experience of research and policy engagement, the panel aims to highlight opportunities that can arise from more systematic learning between think tanks and a wide range of key development actors about both successes and failures of policy research.  

Participant List

Presentations:

 

 9:00 – 10:30
TIF
Hall: D1

World Bank Inspection Panel at 19: Some Lessons for Safeguard Policy Review

Sponsors: Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), Bank Information Center (BIC)

Panelists: Alf Jerve (Chairperson, World Bank Inspection Panel),  Matsuo Ichikawa (Professor, Center for African Area Studies, Kyoto University), Others (TBC)

Spanning two decades of operation as one of the primary oversight mechanisms at the World Bank, the Inspection Panel has reviewed approximately 70 complaints of alleged non-compliance with Bank operational policies.  Although the World Bank often sets the standard for safeguarding development finance to protect people and the environment, the implementation of safeguard policies have faced numerous challenges. The Inspection Panel’s case history offers a unique perspective on the challenges and potential solutions for the most effective application of Bank policies looking forward. 

This panel discussion will center on the possible policy lessons for the Safeguard Review of learning from the emblematic or most frequently registered cases of non-compliance with Bank safeguard policies, particularly project supervision, environmental assessment, and involuntary resettlement. 

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List 

Presentations:


 

9:00 – 10:30
TIF/ CSO CENTER
Room:  251

Strengthening Partnership Between Africa and Japan

Sponsor:  Congo Justice Japan

Panelists: Kuniharu Ishijima (NGO), Shigetsugu Komine (Professor), Shiro Otsu (Journalist), Mukengeshayi Matata (Professor)

Japan and Africa's relationship used to be merely characterized as donor and recipient. However, the relationship between Japan and Africa is changing dramatically over recent years. African countries have today become significant partners for Japan. The time has certainly arrived for Japan to act more on its own initiative to improve relations with Africa.  The Japanese people and civil society should contribute to this global effort by also strengthening their relations with African civil society.  This session will discuss what kind of stance the Japanese people and CSOs should take to improve relations with Africa.

                * Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List 

Presentations:

 

11:00 – 12:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 251

World Bank and IMF Tax Policies: What Tax Policies are the IFIs Advocating and Practicing in Developing Countries?

Sponsors:  European Network on Debt and Development (EURODAD), Latin American Network on Debt and Development (LATINDADD)

Panelists: Pooja Rangaprasad  (Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability, India), Tirivangani Mutazu (African Network and Forum on Debt and Development / AFRODAD), Jorge Trefolgi (Latin American Network on Debt, Development and Rights /  LATINDADD), Eric LeCompte (Jubilee USA), Øygunn Sundsbø Brynildsen (European Network on Debt and Development / EURODAD), CHAIR: Antonio Gambini (CNCD, Belgium)

Tax policy has been at the heart of policy advice from the World Bank and the IMF to developing countries for the last decades. Through policy advice, loan conditions and defining indicators for ”good business environment”, the institutions have been influential in defining developing countries’ tax policies. While the IMF has shown a positive change in its analysis including recognizing the need to assess the equity effects of taxation, both institutions continue having a strong say in the design of tax policies where promotion of private investments are often at the core. Despite its development mandate, the World Bank’s International Finance Corporation (IFC) also continues to channel investments through tax havens.  The purpose of this session is to present regional perspectives and recommendations on the above issues, and their impacts on policy space and domestic resource mobilization.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

Presentations:

11:00 – 12:30
TIF
Hall: D1

World Bank Safeguard Review and CSOs Approaches in their Engagement

Sponsors: Aksi, ‘Ulu Foundation, JACSES, Urgewald

Panelists: Yuki Tanabe (JACSES, Japan), Titi Soentoro (Aksi, Indonesia), Stephanie Fried (‘Ulu Foundation, Hawaii), Korinna Horta (Urgewald, Germany)

The World Bank has launched a review of its safeguard policies with the main objective of enhancing the development effectiveness of Bank’s operations. Projected outcomes of the review include renewing Bank partnership with borrowers; helping to address environmental and social risks of the next decade; increasing effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness; and achieving policy harmonization, coherence and alignment.

A number of CSOs are jointly consolidating their thoughts based on the Bank’s Approach Paper for the safeguards review and CSO experiences in monitoring WB operations.  Interaction between the Bank and CSOs on the approach paper through this panel is meant to provide an opportunity for the Bank and CSOs to highlight areas of importance and provide input about the direction of the review.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

Presentations:

11:00  - 12:30

TIF

 Hall C

PROGRAM OF SEMINAR SESSION:  Post-2015 Global Development Framework: Is There A Role for a Next Generation of Millennium Development Goals? 

Sponsor:  World Bank

Panelists:  Gunilla Carlsson (Minister of International Development Cooperation, Sweden), Helen Clark (Administrator, United Nations Development Programme),

Homi Kharas (Senior Fellow and Deputy Director for the Global Economy and Development Program, Brookings Institute, United States), Jim Yong Kim (President, World Bank Group), Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (President, Republic of Liberia), Akihiko Tanaka (President, JICA, Japan), CHAIR:  Kaushik Basu (Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, World Bank Group)

 

 

The Millennium Development Goals have been successful in attracting much needed attention to development, particularly human aspects of development. As the deadline of 2015 draws closer, calls for preparing goals and targets for the post-2015 period are being made with greater frequency and new enthusiasm. This session will explore how effective current goals have been to improving the lives of people around the world, and provides a critical examination of the goals in light of the development challenges going forward.

 

Key questions to be addressed include:

 

·         How did the MDGs make a difference in people's life? What are its successes and failures?

·         Should one continue with the same set of development goals, add or subtract, or should one focus on a new theme that is relevant for the next decade, say sustainability and or equity? Should the goals become truly universal as e.g. 70 percent of the poor live in middle-income countries and planetary boundaries affect us all? Should the international community also monitor enablers for development such as governance and economic growth?

·         With development taking place at the country level, would it not be more appropriate to have country specific goals and targets that are globally comparable and monitorable by all? Or are globally defined goals and targets still most relevant?

·         Today, we are living in a very different world compared to 10 - 15 years ago, with a different aid architecture emerging. Considering the decreasing weight of ODA, surging increase of south-south cooperation, more engagement of private sectors, and renewed awareness of the importance of domestic resource mobilization, what would the desirable relationship and partnership among different stakeholders be this time around?

 

Follow #wblive during this event and join the conversation

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered


 

12:30 – 14:00
TIF / CSO CENTER
 Room: 253

Addressing Community Grievances Related to World Bank Group Private Sector Projects

Sponsor: Compliance Advisor Ombudsman (CAO) for IFC and MIGA

Panelists: Meg Taylor, Vice President and CAO staff

The CAO is the independent recourse and accountability mechanism for World Bank Group private sector projects financed by IFC and MIGA.  Reporting to the World Bank Group President, the CAO addresses complaints from project affected communities through dispute resolution with parties at the project-level and compliance investigations of IFC's/MIGA's environmental and social due diligence.  This year has been the busiest for the CAO since the office was established in 1999, with 33 cases in 19 countries across a variety of sectors including extractive industries, agribusiness, infrastructure, education, the financial sector, and advisory services to governments. 

Who is using the CAO and why? What issues are being raised in complaints?  What are the predominant trends CAO is seeing in its work?  What are the major challenges? What can be improved?  This session is a conversation to discuss current cases, activities, and issues, including the CAO's accessibility and outcomes in the Asia region.
 

Participant List

Presentations:

12:30 – 14:00
TIF
Hall D1

Post Fukushima: The Role of the Financial Sector in Energy Future

Sponsor:  Takagi Fund for Citizen Science

Panelists: Masafumi Yokemoto  (Associate Professor, Graduate School of Business, Osaka City University), Jan Beranek (Team Leader Energy Campaign, Greenpeace International), Takejiro Sueyoshi (Special Advisor to the UNEP for the Asia Pacific Region), Tsuyoshi Yoshiwara (President, Johnan Shinkin Bank), CHAIR: Yurika Ayukawa (Professor, Chiba University of Commerce)

How to deal with the rapidly growing energy demands in developing nations has become a key global issue. In the face of global challenges such as climate change and biodiversity loss, great efforts have been made to build sustainable solutions. Just 18 months ago, Japan experienced the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident which has triggered a series of major debates and serious review of Japan's energy future.

This session will introduce the audience to an overview of the global energy issues and specific analyses of the economic and environment impacts of Fukushima nuclear power accident, and discuss the roles of the financial sector for a viable global energy future.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

 13:30 – 15:00
TIF/CSO Center
Room 251

Gender, Jobs, and Women’s Rights

Sponsors: Bank Information Center, World Bank

Panelists: Jeni Klugman (Director of Gender and Development, World Bank), Nurgul Dzhanaeva (President of Forum of women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan ), Ana Maria Nemenzo (National Coordinator, Woman Health Philippines), CHAIR: Ian Solomon ( US Executive Director, World Bank)

One year after the World Bank launched its World Development Report on Gender Equality, has anything changed? Speakers will discuss the World Bank’s recent work on gender issues, with a focus on Jobs and Women’s rights.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List 

 

14:00 – 15:30
TIF
Hall D1

MDG1 and Post-2015 Development Agenda

Sponsors: Japan NGO Center for International Cooperation (JANIC), Ugoku / Ugokasu (GCAP Japan),

Panelists: Masaki Inaba (Ugoku/Ugokasu, Japan), Vinod Raina (All India People's Science Movement Network, India), Shinji Yamamoto (Pal-System Consumers' Cooperative Union, Japan), Asako Osaki (Gender Action Platform, Japan), Lau Kin-Chi (Lingnan University, Hong Kong)

The purpose of this seminar is twofold.  First, to share and learn from CSOs and local communities about their experiences related to achieving the reduction of poverty and hunger (MDG1).  Second, to attempt to give some real-life definition to the concept of "inclusive growth and employment” which is one of the new “buzz words” dominating the development discourse and one that could shape the Post-2015 agenda.

The World Bank recently stated that MDG1 has been achieved at the global level, but in low income countries enormous segments of the population are still left behind in extreme poverty and hunger. Even in middle income countries, wider economic disparity and unemployment plague their prospects for broad-based growth and social cohesion. It is  therefore appropriate that the goals of "inclusive growth and employment" are being highlighted in the development, even though the term seems to be endorsed by many actors without a precise understanding or definition. 

This session will showcase existing civil society and local community experiences from North and South that seem to offer practical insights into and policy implications for "inclusive growth and employment". The examples presented will include "NREGA", the Indian public system designed to secure employment in rural contexts, efforts of cooperative unions in East Asia, and activities for gender equality.

                 * Japanese language interpretation will be offered
 
Participant List 

Presentations:

 

14:00 – 15:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
 Room: 253

G-20Y Generation Building long-term Economic Prosperity

Sponsor:  G-20Y Summit IOC

Panelist:  Kseniia Khoruzhnikova (Founder/Chair, G-20Y Summit IOC)

The G-20Y Generation of young and successful business and financial leaders is the first generation for which the participation of 20 countries in a global economic processes is normal. The G-20Y Generation wishes to concentrate its efforts on producing, in the twenty-first century, an unprecedented period of sustainable worldwide economic growth. Mid- and long- term prosperity is the mandate of the G-20Y Generation. It is our responsibility to put it on today’s international agenda.

Participant List

Presentations:

 

16:00 – 17:30
TIF
Hall: D1

Youth Conference “Envisioning the World in 20 Years” Sponsors: Development Japan

Sponsors: Development Japan

Panelists: Yuka Matsushima (Cross Fields), Minami Maeda (Development Japan),  Kazuya Tanaka (Co-CEO, Development Japan), Misa Maeda (Co-CEO, Development Japan), CHAIR: Erina Sudo (Development Japan)

In twenty years, youths today will be facing challenges that are more complicated than ever before. With an unpredictable global economy and a fast changing environment, interdisciplinary leaders who can connect different fields, people, and knowledge, would become the key leaders in solving the future global issues.

This session will bring together Japanese youths, studying and working in different fields and backgrounds, to vision the world in 20 years and propose the important skills that youths believe will be critical in the near future. Through this conference, youths will speak out their voices on how to get young talents more involved in development, and make a commitment as the possible leaders of tomorrow.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List 

 

16:00 – 17:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 253

Green Climate Fund (GCF) and  Lessons Learned from the Forest Investment Fund (FIP)

Sponsors: Ulu Foundation, Aksi, Global Witness

Panelists: Titi Soentoro (Aksi, Indonesia), Rick Jacobsen (Global Witness, FIP CSO Observer), Stephanie Fried (‘Ulu Foundation, Hawai’i)

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) was launched in 2011 with goal of providing support for developing countries to limit or reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt to the impacts of climate change.  The World Bank serves as the interim trustee of the GCF. Meanwhile, the World Bank, IFC, and Asian Development Bank have been involved with the Forest Investment Program (FIP), a targeted program of the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF), which is one of two funds within the framework of the Climate Investment Funds (CIF).  FIP financing, with US$ 639 million in pledges, was meant to complement large-scale investments in developing countries and to leverage additional climate finance resources, including from the private sector with a goal of promoting the protection of forest ecosystem services, and helping countries strengthen forest governance, protect the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities, and implement poverty reduction measures.

One of the crucial questions facing the GCF is the manner by women and men from communities where adaptation or mitigation funds are needed will be empowered to direct (or defend themselves from) processes associated with these funds, processes which affect their lives and livelihoods. These questions take on an urgency in countries under authoritarian or military regimes or where corruption is an important concern.  Lessons learned from the process of initiating the FIP in Indonesia would be important for the GCF to draw on in its development stage.

Participant List

Presentations:

 

16:00 – 17:30
TIF / CSO CENTER
Room: 251

Disaster Response & ICT -  A Case Study of Multi-stakeholder Partnership

Sponsors: Japanese Institute of Social Emergence, NPO Support Center for Program Development 

Panelists: Shintaro Goto (Professor, Rissho University), Takuya Kanda (Managing Director,  Mobile Creators Summit), Tomohiro Fujita  (Information Processing Specialist, Hewlett-Packard Japan), Lena Ryuji (External & Community Affairs Manager,  Microsoft Japan), CHAIR: Kan Suzuki (Principal Japanese Institute of Social Emergence)

Upon the outbreak of East Japan Great Earthquake, many CSOs were at the front line of relief efforts. Through their strengths of connecting multiple stakeholders, their knowledge of the issues, and their capability to collect information on where there is most need, the support provided was valuable to many who suffered the tragedy of the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear plant explosion.

The session will be divided into two sections. First, to introduce multi- stakeholder partnership developed at the initial stage of the disaster by the Government, CSOs, Academics, and the ICT Industry. We will also share lessons learned and recommendations which we believe can be applied globally and help us be prepared for the next natural disaster of this nature.  Second, we will describe the partnerships which still exist as we approach almost 2 years after the March 11 event. These new initiatives have been developed to address societal issues which have appeared during the recovery phase.  They aim to empower each individual and ensure the long term sustainability of the recovery effort.

* Japanese language interpretation will be offered

Participant List

Presentation

16:15 - 17:15

TIF

Hall C

PROGRAM OF SEMINAR SESSION:  The Role of Asia in a Changing World

Sponsor:  International Monetary Fund, Bank of Japan 

Panelists:  Barry Eichengreen (Professor, Department of Economics, University of California-Berkeley, United States), Chanda Kochhar (Managing Director, Chief Executive Officer, ICICI Bank, India), Christine Lagarde (Managing Director, International Monetary Fund), David Daokui Li (Professor of Economics, School of Economics and Management Tsinghua University, China), Masaaki Shirakawa (Governor, Bank of Japan), CHAIR: Maria Bartiromo (Anchor, CNBC, United States)

 

Over the past decades, Asia has grown faster than any other region and by some estimates contributed more than half to global growth in the last few years. While Asia's growth outlook remains bright, the global landscape is rapidly changing, with difficulties in Europe and the United States likely to constrain growth and cross-border flows. At the same time, Asia is evolving with several economies facing pressures from population aging and the need to transition to higher value-added industries. Against this background, Asian economies are in search of new growth model that is more inclusive, driven by domestic demand, and dependent on closer regional ties. As the global economy is managing the difficult transitions, Asia will also have an important role to play in supporting global growth and influencing global economic policies. The seminar will bring together economic leaders from the region and global institutions to discuss the challenges facing Asia to sustain growth forward in the next decade and beyond as well as its new role in this changing world.

 

Key questions to be addressed include:

 

·         Can Asia become rich before it grows old and continue to support global growth? When and where will the demographic growth slowdown begin, and will it be gradual or abrupt? How can Asia be better prepared to cope with demographic changes?

·         Can Asia avoid the "Middle Income Trap" and continue to support global growth? Can Asian economies move up the value-added production ladder while rebalancing growth toward domestic and regional demand?

·         How can Asia contribute to a more stable regional and global economy? How can Asia advance regional economic and financial integration to better cope with global shocks? How effective are regional financial safety nets in mitigating risks to the region and beyond?

·         What will be the role of Asia in a changing world? What challenges does Asia face in the context of the current "global shift"? 

 

  
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Last updated: 2013-03-04




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