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2013 Spring Meetings - Civil Society Policy Forum

Civil Society Policy Forum
Washington, DC
April 17 - 20, 2013

The Civil Society Policy Forum will be held from Wednesday, April 17 to Saturday, April 20, prior to, and during the 2013 Spring Meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank Group (WBG). It is being organized by the Bank and Fund Civil Society Teams. The Forum will bring together IMF and WBG staff, CSO representatives, government officials, academics, and others to exchange views and dialogue on a wide range of topics. 

The CS Forum will also include a CSO Reception and an expected 55 policy dialogue sessions on such issues as global economic recovery, climate change, consultation guidelines, post-MDGs agenda, and safeguards. These sessions will be organized by the Bank, Fund, and CSOs individually or jointly. CSOs will also be able to participate in numerous high level sessions being organized by the Fund and Bank such as a BBC Hard Talk and movie launch of “Girl Rising”. Several sessions are also being organized prior to the CS Forum including a capacity-building session on the IMF and an orientation session on the WBG.

Please find the schedule of policy sessions below. Please check back frequently, as we will be publishing additional information and sessions on an ongoing basis. For additional sessions which are still being planned visit our online draft schedule.   If you would like more information on these sessions, please contact John Garrison (jgarrison@worldbank.org) for WB-related sessions, and Tilla McAntony (tmcantony@imf.org) for IMF-related sessions.

Thanks
World Bank and IMF Civil Society Teams

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursday

Friday

Saturday


Pre-Civil Society Forum Events

Monday, April 15

9:30 am – 4:00 pm
Room: IMF HQ1
1-704  (Events Hall)

Capacity-Building Session on the IMF 

Sponsors: IMF

Panelists: IMF: Karla Chaman, Tilla McAntony (External Relations Department). 

This session will focus on IMF policies and programs.  

 * Coffee, tea, and cookies will be served

 

Tuesday, April 16

9:30 am – 12:00 pm
Room: IMF HQ1
1-704  (Events Hall)

Orientation Session on the World Bank

Sponsors: World Bank Group

Panelists: Jill Wilkins (External Affairs Department, WB), John Garrison (Civil Society Team, WB), Aaron Rosenberg (IFC), Rebecca Post (MIGA), Dina El Neggar (Institutional Integrity Unit/WB)

This session will focus on WBG (IBRD, IFC, MIGA) origins, organizational structure, major policies, and operational work. 

Coffee, tea, and cookies will be served 

 

CIVIL SOCIETY POLICY FORUM EVENTS
April 17 - 20

Wednesday, April 17

8:30  – 9:00
Room: MC C1-100

Welcome Breakfast

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund / World Bank Group

Panelists: Karla Chaman, Tilla McAntony (IMF),  John Garrison, Nneka Okereke (WB)

Come meet the Fund and Bank Civil Society Team staff, learn about Spring Meetings policy agenda and activities such as the CS Forum policy sessions, CSO Reception, and other high-level events, as well as discuss meeting logistics.

 

9:00 – 10:30
Room: TBC

Policy Discussion on IMF Lending Facilities to Low-income Countries

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

  

9:00 – 10:30
Room: TBC

Discussion of Results and Performance (RAP) Report

Sponsor:  Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) / WBG

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 – 10:30
Room: TBC

Update on Global Partnership on Social Accountability (GPSA)

Sponsor: World Bank (World Bank Institute)

Panelists: TBC

The Global Partnership for Social Accountability (GPSA) is a coalition of donors, governments and CSO partners launched by the World Bank in 2012 with the aim to improve development results by supporting capacity building for enhanced citizen feedback and participation. As part of its focus on providing strategic long-term support to civil society organizations that work on social accountability programs, the GPSA recently issued its first Call for Proposals to fund CSO projects in 12 countries.

The session will provide an update on the implementation of the GPSA so far and a discussion on the steps ahead. It will bring together a GPSA Steering Committee member and a representative of one of the GPSA Global Partners to share their perspectives on key issues and opportunities in the way GPSA supports social accountability across the world.

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: TBC

Combating Counterfeit Medicines

Sponsor: World Bank (Legal Vice Presidency), Global Forum on Law, Justice and Development

Panelists: Jan Kleijssen (Council of Europe / CoE), Marco Musumeci  (United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute / UNICRI), Aboubacar Sidiki Diakite (Guinea Ministry of Health), Hatem Ben Salem (WAITO International), Akiko Maeda, Andreas Seiter (World Bank). CHAIR: Michele Forzley (O'Neil Institute on National and Global Health Law)

Counterfeit Medicines (also referred to as spurious, falsely labeled, falsified, counterfeit medicines / SFFC) reached such a level of public health impact to become an obstacle to development, negatively affecting development of societies, and particularly the poor. Counterfeiting and similar crimes affect all medical products, whether they are generic or protected by intellectual property rights IPRs. Data from the Pharmaceutical Security Institute indicates that the illegal trade and manufacture of medicines affected at least 124 countries in 2011, and the burden is disproportionately felt in the developing world.

This panel will bring together government officials and donor agency representatives, CSO leaders to discuss the way forward in the fight against counterfeit medicines. A Community of Practice will be launched to continue the discussion after this event.

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: TBC

Turbocharging Development with Open Data

Sponsor: World Bank (External Affairs), Bank Information Center (BIC)World Bank (Open Data Institute, Open Government Data Working Group)

Panelists: Stela Mocan (Government CIO, Moldova), Timothy Grant Herzog (Development Data Group, WB), Craig Hammer (Open Data Demand Side and Media Engagement, WB), Oleg Petrov (Senior Program Officer, ICT Unit, WB), CHAIR: Amparo Ballivian (Lead Economist and Chair of the Open Government Data Group, WB)

‘Open Data’ is fundamentally about unlocking the value of data by lowering the barriers to its use, and making it freely available to a diverse audience of potential users who otherwise would not be able to benefit from it. Open Data—and in particular government/public data—can contribute significantly to a broad spectrum of public policy goals, including improved transparency and accountability, strengthened citizen participation in governance, more efficient public policy and provision of public services, as well as enhanced economic growth.

This useful resource is however largely untapped yet.
This session is geared to providing insight into the value Open Data initiatives. Expert presenters will deliver brief ‘lightning talks’ on the Social and Economic Value of Open Data using specific examples from the World Bank and global experience. Participants will then have the chance to share their experiences and to explore how ‘Open Data’ might be applied to their development priorities and challenges.
Participants will be asked to make 3-minute ‘Lightening Talks’ to address the following questions:

  • How do you use Open Data in your organization and what kind of data is the most popular?
  • What kind of data would you like to see opened?
  • What uses of data are happening in your country?

Please sign-up here if interested in making presentation

 

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: TBC

Gender Justice: An update on the World Bank’s Gender Work and Views from the Ground

Sponsors: Bank Information Center, World Bank (Gender Team)

Panelists: Jeni Klugman (World Bank Sector Director for Gender), Nelly Stromquist (University of Maryland, US), Timothy Opobo (Childfund International,Uganda), Titi Soentoro (Aksi - for Gender, Social and Ecological Justice, Indonesia), CHAIR: Sarah Aviel (US Alternate Executive Director)

How is the World Bank following up on the 2012 WDR on Gender Equality? A year after the WDR on Gender was released, panelists will discuss how this ground-breaking report has affected how the Bank works in practice.  This will include an update on activities since the annual meetings in Tokyo.  The panel will also consider the possible need for a gender safeguard to protect women from impacts and risks of WB investments.

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: TBC

Strengthening Citizens Voices for Improved Governance

Sponsors: Civicus, World Bank (World Bank Institute)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: TBC

Update on the Independent Evaluation Office’s Work

Sponsors: New Rules for Global Finance Coalition, Independent Evaluation Office (IMF)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: TBC

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Sponsors: Sierra Club

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: TBC

What Next for the Eurozone? Macroeconomic Policy and the Recession

Sponsor: Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: TBC

Coalition Building on LGBT Issues

Sponsor: World Bank (World Bank Group Employee Resource Group for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Gay Staff)

Panelists: Rev. Canon Albert Ogle (President of St. Paul’s Foundation for International Reconciliation), Bryan Choong (Director, Ooogachaga), Maxensia Nakibuuka Takirambule (Executive Director, Lungujja Community Health Caring Organization, Uganda), Rev. MacDonald Sembereka (Executive Director, MANRELA for Spirit of 76), CHAIR: Philip W. Moeller (Institutional and Social Development Consultant to the World Bank)

The focus of the session is on the need to forge stronger and more inclusive coalitions at the grass roots level to advocate for increased social services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations. Faith-based groups have a special role in such coalitions, and often they have been a major provider of services on the local level.  What are the positive and negative aspects of their role in service delivery relating to LGBT issues?  

CSOs addressing LGBT concerns serve a constituency that is often left out of development efforts. Sometimes they face special problems because of the focus of their mission. Yet the participation of LGBT constituencies in the development process is necessary in order for development to be inclusive and effective. CSOs should work to encourage the World Bank Group and other development agencies to include LGBT issues and constituents in social assessment and monitoring efforts during the appraisal, supervision, and evaluation phases of Bank-financed projects. The session will address how this can be best achieved and discuss good practices in this regard.

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: TBC

Discussion on IMF Jobs and Growth Policies

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: TBC

Upward Harmonization of World Bank Safeguard Policies with the Best Standards: Lessons Learned about Informed Consultations, Gender, and Financial Intermediaries

Sponsors: Aksi, Ulu Foundation, Solidaritas Perempuan, Urgewald, Friends of the Earth/US

Panelists: Titi Soentoro, Rio Ismail (Aksi), Stephanie Fried ('Ulu Foundation), Puspa Dewy (Solidaritas Perempuan), Petra Kejl (Bretton Woods Project), CHAIR: Korinna Horta (Urgewald)

At a meeting with CSOs during the World Bank’s Annual General Meeting in Tokyo in 2012, Bank President Kim made a commitment that the Bank’s review of its safeguard policies review will not result in any weakening or “dilution” of existing policies. This statement has been repeated on many occasions by other WB staff, including the safeguard policies review team. Furthermore, the Bank’s approach paper indicates the importance of considering the benefits of policy harmonization and coherence with relevant aspects of other sustainability frameworks and recognized global good practices. The review and update will take note of recent safeguard updates by other MDBs, particularly those that address both public and private sector borrowers.

This session will discuss key issues for upward harmonization for the safeguard policies review –drawing from lessons learned from achievements of other MDBs in their safeguard policy update such as ADB, from assessments of the World Bank own operations and of the CSOs engaged in monitoring the World Bank. The key issues to be explored are: informed consultation, gender, forest and the impact of recent findings regarding financial intermediaries.

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: TBC

Briefing on IFC Agribusiness and Private Sector Window of the GAFSP Program

Sponsor: IFC

Panelists: Laura Mecagni (Head, Agriculture and Forestry Department), and Mark Constantine (Principal Strategy Officer, Agriculture and Forestry Department)

IFC Staff will discuss the objectives of the Private Sector Window of the Global Agriculture and Food Security (GAFSP) Program, describing the investments and advisory services programs made to date, as well as a description of the use of blended finance as an innovative financial solution, and the unique opportunity for collaboration of public sector projects and private sector projects under the program.

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: TBC

Health Effects on Coal

Sponsor: Physicians for Social Responsability

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

5:30 – 7:00
Room: MC 10-512 (Inspection Panel Office)

Inspection Panel Reception

Sponsor: Inspection Panel (WB)

As part of the World Bank/IMF Spring Meetings 2013, the Inspection Panel is pleased to welcome you to its traditional Open House. Come meet Panel Members and Secretariat staff, learn how the Panel works, and exchange views with us. Refreshments will be served.

The Inspection Panel is an independent complaints mechanism for people who believe that they have been, or are likely to be, adversely affected by a World Bank-funded project. The Panel provides for accountability through assessment of Bank's compliance with operational policies. The process is designed to provide redress to affected people and address issues of policy non-compliance and harm.

 

5:30 – 6:30
Room: TBC

Reception for Launch CIVICUS State of Civil Society Report

Sponsors: CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation

Panelist: Danny Sriskandarajah (Secretary General)

Join the new Secretary General of CIVICUS, Danny Sriskandarajah, for the launch of this year’s State of Civil Society report. With around 40 contributions from leading experts from around the world, this year’s report will provide a comprehensive account of the challenges and opportunities facing civil society. The launch event will include a short presentation about the report, including its special thematic focus on the enabling environment for civil society.


        * Refreshments will be served.

 

Thursday, April 18

9:00 - 10:30
Room: TBC

Managing Risk for Development: Discussion of the World Development Report 2014 (under preparation)

Sponsors:  World Bank (World Development Report 2014 Team)

Panelists: Norman V. Loayza (Director WDR 2014),  Izabela Toft (Sr Corporate Strategist CordAid, Netherlands), Sasanka Thilakasiri (Policy advisor, Oxfam International).

It is said that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Why does the development community act as if it doesn’t know this?  Too often, we fight the consequences of risk and vulnerability rather than addressing their causes. Far too many risks and vulnerabilities remain ignored, until it’s too late.

The team working on the World Development Report 2014 on Managing Risk to Development hopes to see this change. The report, currently under preparation, considers many risks prevalent in developing countries, and asks: why is it that families, communities, firms, and countries so often fail to prevent and prepare for risk? What can be done to change that? How can better risk management unleash opportunity?

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: TBC

Revising IMF Guidelines on Consultations

Sponsors: IMF

Panelist: Dr. Bessma Momani (Associate Professor, University of Waterloo, Canada, and Non-Resident Fellow, Brookings Institution, United States)

This session will provide an IMF Consultant, tasked with revising the IMF Guide for Staff Relations with Civil Society, the opportunity to listen and incorporate the feedback of CSOs on their perceptions for improving the IMF Guidelines. In order to frame the discussion, the Consultant will present findings from a study of good consultation practices in other organizations, preliminary findings from interviews with IMF staff on their perceptions about their consultation approaches, and reflections from a desk research.

The session will be a candid information gathering exercise geared to: learn about how CSO want to be engaged in IMF missions; what form of engagement with CSOs is deemed successful and effective; hear reflections about effective means of engagement with other international organizations; and to learn how the IMF can improve the format, timing, and substance of consultations with CSOs. This session will be a key source for incorporating CSO ideas and reflections in revising the guidelines.

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: TBC

Defining the Boundaries of a Project:  Where does Bank Accountability Stop?


Sponsor: Inspection Panel (WB)


Panelists: Alf Jerve (Chair of the Inspection Panel), Glenn Morgan (Regional Safeguards Advisor, Latin America and the Caribbean Region, World Bank ), Joshua Klemm (Africa Program Manager, Bank Information Center),  CHAIR: Peter Lallas (Executive Secretary of the Inspection Panel)

 

The World Bank is accountable for impacts of projects it supports. This assumes that one can both determine the area of influence of a project as well as the causal relationship between a project and impacts. When impacts are negative, affected people may complain to the Inspection Panel. The Panel has had many cases where the ‘area of influence’ and ‘causal relationship or link’ have been key issues. Some may be inclined to take a restrictive approach, while others would like the Bank to take a more comprehensive approach to be able to leverage broader development efforts.

 

The Bank’s safeguard policies provide guidance on how to define area of influence for projects that have a physical footprint, but boundaries are often contested. Today, it is expected that an increasing share of Bank’s lending will be contributions to larger programs and budgets of governments, such as through the new Program for Results (PforR) lending instrument. What would be the area of influence and impacts attributable to such projects?

 

The Panel will share its experiences on these matters from recent cases, and the speakers will deliberate on how Bank policies help define boundaries of a project and Bank’s accountability. The discussion is relevant in the context of the review of Bank’s Safeguard Policies and management of project risks more broadly. This session would be of particular interest to CSOs and other development practitioners interested in issues of accountability of IFIs, and to those following the World Bank’s operational policy reform.

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: J 1 – 050
(701 18th St.)

Towards an Improved Project Design: Insights from Along the Nile

Sponsors: Bank Information Center

Panelists: Abdelmawla Ismail (Egyptian Association for Collective Rights)

Many factors should be considered during project design in order to produce sustainable and successful development projects, This panel will focus on one important step toward determining the best project possible: having a robust study of alternatives. The panel will discuss employing a holistic vision when selecting project sites and goals, taking into account all critical sectors including agriculture and food security, and accounting for the social and environmental impacts in the cost-benefit analysis. The North Giza power plant, co-funded by the World Bank and built on the fertile land of Egypt, will be used to illustrate the broader issues at hand.

 

11:00 - 12:30
Room: TBC

The World Bank’s Access to Information Policy & Open Initiatives– Leading the Way Forward.

Sponsors: World Bank (External Affairs), Bank Information Center

Panelists: Paul Bermingham (Director, Operations Policy and Country Services Unit), Chad Dobson (Executive Director, Bank Information Center), Gregory Adams (Director of Aid Effectivenss, Oxfam America), CHAIR: Sumir Lal (Manager, Bank External Affairs)

Since the launch of its Access to Information policy and the Open Data Initiative in 2010, the World Bank has adopted a three pronged approach to make strides towards greater openness.  The World Bank is open about:

  • What we know (data, tools and development knowledge)
  • What we do (operations, projects, finances and commitments)
  • How we work (knowledge, partnerships, engagement platforms and solutions)

The session will provide civil society interlocutors and advocacy groups with an update on the AI Policy implementation progress since July 2010; and the direction the Bank is taking on transparency and open data initiatives, including leading roles in the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI), Open Aid Partnership, Aidflows among others.

  

11:00 - 12:30
Room: TBC

Learning and Equity in the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Sponsors: Save the Children, Women Thrive Worldwide, Center for Universal Education (Brookings Institution)

Panelists: TBC

With the 2015 MDGs deadline fast approaching, Save the Children, Women Thrive Worldwide, and the Center for Universal Education at Brookings are working collectively and with partners around the world to learn the lessons of the Millennium Development Goals and contribute to the evolution of an ambitious new global development framework.

This session provides an opportunity for high-level representatives from multiple arenas—including the Government of Nigeria, United Nations, World Bank, African civil society, and Center for Universal Education at Brookings—to discuss education priorities for the post-2015 framework. Though the specific targets and indicators have yet to be determined, there is strong consensus emerging that a global learning goal must be one critical component of the post-2015 development agenda. It will also be critical that any goal and targets ensure a stronger focus on the most marginalized children and youth and achieving more equitable school systems.


 

11:00 - 12:30
Room: TBC

Preventing Mass Atrocities Through Development Policies: A Round Table on Economic, Social and Legal Aspects

Sponsors: Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation, Bellagio Forum for Sustainable Development (US), Budapest Centre for the International Prevention of Genocide and Mass Atrocities, Office of the World Bank Executive Director for Germany, Office of the World Bank Executive Director for Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay

Panelists: Enzo M. Le Fevre Cervini (Representative of the Budapest Centre for the International Prevention of Genocide and Mass Atrocities), Dr. Juan Mendez (Professor of Law, American University and UN Special Rapporteur on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment or Punishment), Troy Alexander (Project Finance Partner, White & Case, LLP), Prof. Emilio Viano (Representative of Bellagio Forum for Sustainable Development), CHAIR: Dr.James Waller (Academic Programs Coordinator, Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation)

Mass atrocities and genocide present an ongoing threat to global development, prosperity, and stability. The movement to end mass atrocities is a nascent one that arose from the outrage after the Holocaust and the conflicts in Bosnia, Rwanda and Sudan. This movement encourages governments to mobilize to protect vulnerable populations, and to find ways to interrupt the processes that can lead to genocide or mass atrocities. Recent advancements in genocide prevention policy provide a climate for concerted action amongst international, regional, and national institutions, including development institutions. 

Development processes address the structural causes of mass atrocities, including poverty and exclusion, but prevention goes beyond enforcement of non-discrimination laws.  The question we hope to answer is how development programs may further contribute to the prevention of genocide and mass atrocities. 

This session seeks to facilitate a dialogue on what a genocide prevention “lens” for development policy might look like when implemented in societies at risk of mass atrocity, especially in post-conflict and fragile states.  The discussion will be supported by the experience of the Auschwitz Institute’s governmental and civil society partners, complemented by private attorneys familiar with development projects in the public and private sectors.

 

12:45 - 2:00
Room: TBC

Briefing on IDA 17 Replenishment


Sponsors: World Bank (Concessional Financing and Partnerships Vice Presidency)


Panelists: TBC


Session description forthcoming

 

 

12:45 - 2:00
Room: TBC

Safeguards for Forests - Beyond REDD

Sponsors: Greenpeace

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:45 - 2:00
Room: TBC

From Vision to Action: Youth Engagement

Sponsors: World Bank (External Affairs)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 - 3:30
Room: TBC

World Bank Group Re-engagement in Myanmar

Sponsors: World Bank, IFC

Panelists: Kanthan Shankar (WB Country Manager for Myanmar), Sergio Pimenta (Hong Kong Office Director, IFC), Catherine Martin (Principal Strategy Officer, East Asia and Pacific Region, IFC), CHAIR: Maria Ionata (WB Country Program Coordinator for Myanmar).

World Bank and IFC staff will share findings from a recent trip by World Bank Group leadership to Myanmar, and discuss plans on future engagement in the country. This will be followed by a general discussion.

 

2:00 - 4:00
Room: TBC

Mobilizing International Resources for Financing Africa's Agriculture

Sponsors: African Business Roundtable

Panelists: TBC

Agriculture continues to be a major growth driver in many countries of the world. This is particularly true in the case of developing countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America where food production provides the bulk of personal and national income as well as employment for a sizeable percentage of the population. With the world economy now on a fragile recovery from the global financial and economic crisis, the call for additional ‘growth poles’ for the world has never been louder and Africa has been recognized to play that important role.

With growth rates far beyond the global average in the last ten years and a projected GDP growth of 5% in 2013, Africa is expected to be a growth driver for the global economy. For that to happen, there is the need to bring Africa’s agriculture on a more meaningful and sustainable path with a view to unleashing the potential of that sector. A major challenge is the need to scale up the financing of agricultural projects and programs. In that regard, there is the need to develop effective innovative financing mechanisms to complement existing instruments for agricultural financing.

Since domestic resources have proven to be inadequate, there is the need to complement it with resources from the international system, particularly those designed to outlive the current financial challenges in the global economic system. This may be a huge challenge, however, given the Eurozone crisis and the weak US economic recovery.

It is against this background that the African Business Roundtable is hosting this high level panel which will bring together key stakeholders such as policy makers, agriculture practitioners, and business leaders to discuss and propose solutions for agricultural financing in Africa. Specifically, panelists will assess the progress made, reaffirm goals and commitments, share best practice and lessons learned, and identity actions and initiatives to overcome them.

 

2:00 - 3:30
Room: TBC

Debt Limits 

Sponsors: IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 - 5:30
Room: MC C2 - 142

The Power of Openness

Sponsors: World Bank (External Affairs), Bank Information Center (BIC)

This in-depth learning event will address how the World Bank’s Open Development initiative – part of the business modernization and reforms process – is fostering the World Bank’s commitment to transparency, accountability, and results.

Various Bank data platforms and databases will be presented including: Open Development Data; Open Access Policy & Open Knowledge Repository; Open Projects & Operations; World Bank Finances; Mapping for Results and Citizen Engagement; and Open Government Data. CSOs attending this session will gain a better understanding of Open Development approach, linkages between various open initiatives, and the Bank’s role in it. The session will feature guided demos and interactive presentations. Registration is required.

Space is limited and preference will be given to non-Washington based participants. Please RSVP to Sahana Roy (ssenroy@worldbank.org) by Friday, April 12, 2013. Please include your full name, the name of your organization, and the country where you are based. We will inform registered participants at least two days before the event.

* Refreshments will be served

Power of Openness - Session Agenda

 

4:00 - 5:30
Room: TBC

Justice for Forests: A Call to Action

Sponsors: Ugerwald, Ulu Foundation

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 - 5:30
Room: TBC

The new .NGO and .ONG Domains: The Future of the Internet and the Global NGO Community

Sponsors: AMGlobal Consulting

Panelists: Brian Cute (CEO of the Public Interest Registry,  Andrew Mack (Principal and Founder of AMGlobal Consulting )

The upcoming years of 2013 and 2014 will see major changes in the Internet space, as ICT infrastructure and access across the globe continue to improve and as over a thousand new “Top Level Domains” will be introduced. Among them will be two new extensions – .NGO and .ONG – designed specifically to serve the global NGO/CSO community. 

Join Brian Cute, CEO of the Public Interest Registry – the non-profit that runs .ORG and is launching .NGO – and Andrew Mack for a wide-ranging discussion on the changes and the significant opportunities for NGOs in an expanding online world. The session will explore three issues:

  • How NGOs can leverage these changes to better connect with partners, improve visibility, attract new funding and generally foster a greater sense community;
  • The benefits and challenges of creating an NGO-focused/NGO-only online space; and,
  • The opportunities for NGOs/CSOs themselves to play a leadership role in helping develop and manage these new online communities.

 

4:00 - 5:30
Room: TBC

IFIs and Aid Coordination in Burma’s economic Transition 

Sponsors: US Campaign for Burma, Paung Ku

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

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Friday, April 19

9:00 - 10:30
Room: TBC

Consultation on Fiscal Transparency Policy of IMF

Sponsors:  IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: TBC

Update and Discussion with CAO Staff

Sponsor: Compliance Advisor Ombudsman / CAO (IFC)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: TBC

Turning Ideas Into Action: Responsible Business Conduct and the First Year of Implementing the Updated OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises

Sponsors: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

Panelists: Sharan Burrow (General Secretary, International Trade Union Confederation), Shaun Donnelly (Vice President, Investment and Financial Services, U.S. Council for International Business), Marie-France Houde (Senior Economist, OECD Secretariat), Joseph Wilde-Ramsing (Senior Researcher, OECD Watch), CHAIR: Alan Yu (United States National Contact Point for the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises)

The OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises (the Guidelines) are the only government-backed set of recommendations on responsible business conduct in existence today. Addressed by governments to multinational enterprises (MNEs) operating in or from adhering countries, the Guidelines cover all areas of business ethics, including employment and labour, human rights and environment. 44 countries that account for a large majority of world's foreign direct investment currently adhere to the Guidelines. The Guidelines are also the only international corporate responsibility instrument with a built-in conflict resolution mechanism. Adhering countries are obliged to set up National Contact Points (NCPs) that are tasked with furthering the effectiveness of the Guidelines by undertaking promotional activities, handling inquiries and providing a mediation and conciliation platform for resolving issues that arise from the alleged non-observance of the Guidelines.

The Guidelines were last updated in 2011 through a consensus-based multi-stakeholder process. Main changes include a new human rights chapter, adoption of risk-based due diligence as the baseline responsibility of MNEs in many areas of business ethics, extended application to global supply chains and business relationships, clearer and reinforced procedures to strengthen the role of NCPs, and inclusion of a proactive agenda to assist MNEs in identifying and responding to risks in their global operations and supply chains that have the potential for adverse impacts if not addressed.  This session will encompass several key themes from the first year of implementation of the updated Guidelines, including lessons learned, efforts to improve NCP mediation capacities, proactive agenda projects in the financial and extractive sectors, and engagement with non-adherent countries.

Reference documents:

  • OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises
  • Flyer on the Guidelines

 

10:00 – 12:00
Room: U 12 – 400
(1800 G St, NW) 

Open House by MIGA Managers

Sponsors:  Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA)

This session will provide an opportunity for CSO representatives to meet with MIGA staff to learn more about MIGA and to discuss any issues of concern. Any questions may be directed to Cara Santos Pianesi at csantospianesi@worldbank.org.

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: TBC

Dissecting the IMF/FSB Early Warning Exercise

Sponsors: Centre for International Governance Innovation, New Rules for Global Finance

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: TBC

The Human Rights Policy in German Development Cooperation & the World Bank’s Safeguard Review 

Sponsors:  Ugerwald, German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)

Panelists: Ralf Wyrwinski (Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development / BMZ), Anders Zeijlon (Nordic Trust Fund at the World Bank), Jessica Evans (Human Rights Watch), CHAIR: Korinna Horta (Urgewald)

In 2011 the BMZ adopted a new Human Rights Strategy that is binding for bilateral cooperation. While it recognizes that the World Bank and other multilateral agencies consider it to be problematic to explicitly adopt a human rights approach, the BMZ’s Human Rights Strategy is committed to promote such an approach at these institutions.

This Panel will present and discuss the BMZ’s Human Rights Strategy, the Nordic Trust Fund’s efforts in promoting a human rights debate at the Bank, an NGO perspective on the need for a human rights approach at the World Bank, and why this discussion matters for the Bank’s ongoing Safeguard Review.

 

 

1:00 – 2:00
Room: TBC

BBC Hard Talk on Global Economy

Sponsors: British Broadcasting Company (BBC)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: TBC

Consultations: Learning from Practice

Sponsors: World Bank (Operations Communications Team)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: TBC

Comparative Safeguard Policies at the other IFIs 

Sponsors: Aksi for Gender, Social and Ecological Justice

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: TBC

Land investments:Tenure and Transparency

Sponsor: Oxfam

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 4:00
Room: TBC

Discussion of CAO Financial Markets Audit

Sponsors: International Finance Corporation (IFC)

Panelists: Henrik Linders (Consultant, Compliance Advisor / Ombudsman), James Scriven (Director, Financial Markets Department, IFC), and Bill Bulmer (Director, Environment, Social, and Governance Department, IFC)

This session will focus on the CAO's recent audit of IFC financial intermediary investments. Panelists from the CAO and IFC's Financial Markets and Environment, Social, and Governance Departments will present their perspectives on the report, implications for IFC’s future work, and report recommendations. This will be followed by a general discussion.

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: TBC

Dialogue on Managing Forests for Sustainable Development:  Lessons Learned from a Decade of World Bank Group Experience

Sponsors: Independent Evaluation Group / IEG (World Bank)

Panelists: Stoyan Tenev (Manager, IEG), Lauren Kelly (Researcher, IEG, WB), CHAIR: Marvin Taylor-Dormond (Director, IEG)

This session invites participants to discuss the findings of IEG’s forest evaluation, “Managing Forests for Sustainable Development: Lessons Learned from a Decade of World Bank Group Experience,” in the context of the evolving state of forests, forest management, and the role of the World Bank Group.  In 2002, the World Bank Group shifted its approach in the forest sector by putting poverty alleviation and sustainable economic development on equal footing with conservation. A decade into its implementation, IEG evaluated the progress made and the results of its approach.  

This highly participatory evaluation involved a complete portfolio review of 289 World Bank projects, 56 IFC investments, 44 advisory service operations, and three MIGA projects. The evaluation team also interviewed international and national nongovernmental organizations, and conducted field visits with civil society organizations and project beneficiaries in 13 countries including Brazil, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Indonesia. In addition, the team gathered feedback from tropical timber associations, certification entities, independent monitoring groups, forest enterprises, and conducted interviews at the Racewood Conference in the Republic of Congo.

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: TBC

Discussion on New World Bank Framework


Sponsors: World Bank (Change Management Team)


Panelists: TBC

 

Session description forthcoming

 

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: TBC

IMF Reform in Developing Country Perspective: Legitimacy, Policy and Roles of the Fund 

Sponsors: Bretton Woods Project, REBRIP, Public Services International

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

6:00 – 7:30
Room: MC Atrium 

CSO Reception

Sponsors: IMF (External Relations), World Bank (External Affairs)

Co-hosted by External Affairs (WB) and External Relations (IMF) Departments, and remarks by Caroline Anstey (Managing Director, WB) and Gerry Rice (EXR Director, IMF).

Come meet with Bank and IMF staff, and mingle with other CSO representatives.


Saturday, April 20

 9:00 - 10:30
Room: TBC

G7+ New Deal Discussion on Resilience

Sponsors:  Alliance for Peacebuilding, Cordaid

Panelists: Georges Tshionza Mata (Coordonnateur Régional, Projet de Renforcement des Capacités de la Société Civile dans la Prévention et la Gestion des Conflits, Congo DRC), Erin McCandless (Executive Editor, Journal of Peacebuilding and Development, United States), Jasper Cummeh (Senior Policy Director, Actions for Genuine Democratic Alternative, Liberia), Mahbouba Seraj (Chairperson, Afghan Women Network, Afghanistan), Rita Martin (Director, EVE Organization, South Sudan), Larry Attree (Acting  Head of Policy, Saferworld, United Kingdom), CHAIR: Melanie Greenberg (President and CEO, Alliance for Peacebuilding,  United States)

A central challenge in the post-2015 debates is how to weave concepts of inclusive governance, peace building, and violence reduction into the post-MDG framework. The New Deal offers valuable lessons for all countries in how to build peace, develop strong institutions, and how to measure progress in these areas. Rooted in communities, civil society groups have unique expertise in building resilience from the ground up, and engaging with their governments in these processes. Since Busan, CSOs have been active in New Deal implementation, including fragility assessments and the development of shared and country-specific indicators.

Lessons from this experience can benefit the development of the Post-2015 Goals. Viable indicators, for example, can set incentives for reducing violence and fuel drivers of peace. Civil society experts from DRC, South Sudan, Liberia, and Afghanistan will explain how the lessons from New Deal pilot states can inform Post-2015 processes in support of peaceful, resilient societies.

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: TBC

Financial Stability Board-Views from Insiders and From Campaigners

Sponsors: New Rules for Global Finance

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: TBC

After Recent Court Decisions: How can Sovereign Debt Workouts become Fair, Comprehensive and Reliable

Sponsors: Jubilee USA, Bred for the World (Germany)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

 

9:30 - 1:00
Room: JB1 – 080
(701 18th St.)

Report Out on the Safeguards Review Consultation Process

Sponsor:  World Bank (Safeguards Team)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: TBC

Arab Countries and IMF Loans and Policies

Sponsors: Third World Network, Arab NGO Network

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: TBC

Oil, Money & Secrecy in East Africa

Sponsors: Committee to Protect Journalists, Africa Region (WBG)

Panelists: TBC

The discoveries of natural resources across East Africa have brought opportunities and challenges for the press in this region. The discovery of new oil and natural gas reserves in eastern DRC, Kenya, Uganda, South Sudan and Tanzania has led to increasing foreign interest in the region. However, independent international and local journalists have faced challenges in piercing official opacity surrounding critical issues, including the terms of the deals with multinationals, the impact of exploitation on the environment, and the extent of reinvestment of proceeds accrued from exploitation into social programs. Can these emerging oil and gas markets avoid the troubles that have long accompanied natural resource exploitation in states like Nigeria and Angola? This session will bring together various perspectives for a general discussion on this topic.

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: TBC

Measuring the Performance of African Think Tanks

Sponsors: Africa Region (World Bank)

Panelists: Frannie Léautier (Executive Secretary, African Capacity Building Foundation (Zimbabwe), Julie LaFrance (Senior Program Specialist, International Development Research Centre, Canada), Julia Clarke (Policy Analyst, Center for Global Development, United States), CHAIR: Shanta Devarajan (Chief Economist, Africa Region, WBG)

Think tanks are important civil society organizations from both a demand and supply side perspective. On the supply side, think tanks are thought to generate independent policy research that produces proposals and recommendations which decision-makers can use as inputs in the process of developing public policy. On the demand side, think tank products – studies, reports, policy briefs – can help improve the level and quality of public discourse around key policy issues affecting society, thereby giving voice to advocacy groups and ultimately making governments more accountable for their policy choices. Think tanks, therefore, can exert a strong influence over both the debate and eventual policy choices.

As the development sector moves towards a culture of results, the measurement of think tank performance, effectiveness, and impact assumes greater significance. However, it remains a challenge. The interesting but controversial Global Go-To Think Tanks Report, published annually by the University of Pennsylvania, is a ranking of think tanks globally on a number of criteria, including discipline and region. It has been criticized for its methodology, among other things, and described as a “beauty contest” that merely lists rather than ranks think tanks using contested criteria. The relevance of these criteria to the African context - where over 500 think tanks exist but only few arrive at a level of impact and global excellence – are called into question.

This session brings together two key institutions that support African think tanks – the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) and the Canadian International Development Research Centre / Think Tank Initiative (IDRC/TTI) – and others who have been working on the measurement of think tank performance, to consider what metrics make sense when applied to African think tanks, given the complex and sometimes opaque nature of the policy process in many African countries.

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: TBC

The Challenges of Advancing Sustainability at the World Bank

Sponsors: World Resources Institute (WRI)

Panelists: TBC

This panel aims to reflect on some of the major sustainability challenges facing the World Bank through an exploration of two WRI research areas: a portfolio analysis on 2012 projects, and the interaction between country systems and World Bank safeguard approaches. This discussion will build upon evidence from World Bank projects, approaches, and policies as they have been applied in developing countries. It will also provide an opportunity to discuss different perspectives on how the World Bank will play a role in advancing core concepts of sustainability in developing economies. 

As the issue of sustainability – through the management of social and environmental risks to populations and the advancement of climate issues – has become even more central and complementary to the core Bank mandate of reducing poverty, this panel will serve as a timely look at some of the ways in which sustainability is advanced by the institution, and the challenges therein.

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: TBC

Discussion on Review of Doing Business Report

Sponsors: Independent Panel on Doing Business Report Review

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: TBC

The Role of Climate Finance in Scaling-up Investments in Low-carbon Energy

Sponsors:  World Resources  Institute

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: TBC

Civil Society Strategy Session on Doing Business Report

Sponsors: Oxfam, CAFOD, Center of Concern, ITUC, Bretton Woods Project

Panelists: TBC


Session description forthcoming

 


Last updated: 2013-04-08




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