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2013 Spring Meetings - Civil Society Policy Forum

Civil Society Policy Forum
Washington, DC
April 17 - 20, 2013

The Civil Society Policy Forum was held from Wednesday, April 17 to Saturday, April 20, prior to, and during the 2013 Spring Meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank Group (WBG). Organized by the Bank and Fund Civil Society Teams, the Forum brought together IMF and WBG staff, CSO representatives, government officials, academics, and others to exchange views and dialogue on a wide range of topics.

The CS Forum included a CSO Reception, some 60 policy dialogue sessions on such issues as global economic recovery, climate change, consultation guidelines, the post-MDGs agenda, and safeguards. These sessions were organized by the Bank, Fund, and CSOs individually or jointly. CSOs also participated in numerous high level sessions that were organized by the Fund and Bank during the Spring Meetings such as the Global Voices on Poverty roundtable featuring World Bank President Jim Yong Kim and UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, a BBC Hard Talk interview with Christine Lagardeand the Washington DC premiere of the documentary “Girl Rising”. Several sessions were organized prior to the CS Forum including a capacity-building session on the IMF and an orientation session on the WBG, and a CSO roundtable with Executive Directors

Please find below the schedule of policy sessions that were held and check back in the coming days for participant lists, presentations and photo gallery from the events.

Thanks
World Bank and IMF Civil Society Teams

2013 SMs CSOs Program Photo Gallery

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursday

Friday

Saturday


Pre-Civil Society Forum Events

Monday, April 15

9:30 am – 4:30 pm
Room: IMF HQ1
1-704 (Events Hall)

Orientation Session on the IMF

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: Sabina Bhatia, Rhoda Weeks-Brown, Karla Chaman, Tilla McAntony (External Relations Department), Bhaswar Mukhopadhyay, Serpil Bouza (Strategy and Policy Deparment), Alan MacArthur (Institute for Capacity Development)

This session will focus on IMF policies and programs.

Tuesday, April 16

9:30 am – 12:30 pm
Room: IMF HQ1
1-704 (Events Hall)

Orientation Session on the World Bank

Sponsor: World Bank Group

Panelists: Jill Wilkins (External Affairs Department, WB), John Garrison (Civil Society Team, WB), Aaron Rosenberg (Public Affairs Unit, IFC), Rebecca Post (Communications Team, MIGA), Dina El Neggar (Institutional Integrity Unit/WB)

This session will focus on the three major agencies of the World Bank Group -- IBRD, IFC, MIGA – and its four independent compliance mechanism: Inspection Panel, Compliance Advisor Ombudsman, Independent Evaluation Group, and Institutional Integrity Vice-Presidency. Presentations and ensuing discussion will focus on origins, organizational structure, major policies, and operational work for the WBG and each agency.

Presentations:

Garrison
Rosenberg
El Neggar 
Post

 

2:30 am – 4:30 pm
Room: IMF HQ1
1-704 (Events Hall)

Lessons Learned on Engaging the IFIs Around Development Policies

Sponsors: IMF, World Bank

Panelists: Lawrence McDonald (Vice President, Center on Global Development), Chad Dobson (Executive Director, Bank Information Center)

This will be a roundtable discussion between CSO based in Washington and those visiting from developing countries about the experiences and lessons learned on engaging the IMF and World Bank around key issues such as climate change, safeguards, and open development.

 

5:30 – 6:30
MC 12 - 700

Executive Directors Roundtable with CSOs

Sponsor: World Bank Group

Co-hosts: Merza Hasan (WB Executive Director, MENA Constituency), Ian Solomon (WB Executive Director, United States), Danny Sriskandarajah, (Secretary General, CIVICUS)

This will be a roundtable discussion between WBG Executive Directors and civil society representatives accredited to the Spring Meetings. The purpose of this event is to promote an exchange of views and discussion on 2013 Spring Meeting policy issues such as the Bank’s development strategy, poverty eradication policies, safeguards review, and climate change.

CIVIL SOCIETY POLICY FORUM EVENTS 
April 17 - 20

Wednesday, April 17

8:30 – 9:00
Room: MC C1-100

Welcome Breakfast

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund / World Bank Group

Panelists: Karla Chaman, Tilla McAntony (IMF), John Garrison, Nneka Okereke (WB)

Come meet the Fund and Bank Civil Society Team staff, learn about Spring Meetings policy agenda and activities such as the CS Forum policy sessions, CSO Reception, and other high-level events, as well as discuss meeting logistics.

 

9:00 – 10:30
Room: MC C1-100

Frameworks to support IMF Policy Advice to Low-income Countries

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: Catherine Pattillo (Advisor, Strategy, Policy, and Review Department), Paul Mathieu (Division Chief, Monetary and Capital Markets Department), Felipe Zanna (Senior Economist, Research Department).

The session will focus on the tools and frameworks that the Fund has developed to support the policy dialogue with low-income countries that focus on: strengthening financial sector surveillance, management of natural resource revenues, and assessing linkages between scaling up of public investment, growth and debt sustainability. The discussion will be illustrated with some country examples of the application of these tools and frameworks.

Participants List

Presentations:

Mathieu
Second
Third
Fourth

9:00 – 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 110

Roundtable Dialogue on Improving Institutional Capability and Financial Viability to Sustain Transport

Sponsor: Independent Evaluation Group (IEG) / WBG

Panelists: Midori Makino (Lead Evaluation Officer, IEG), Om Prakash Agarwal (Senior Urban Transport Specialist, WB), Jean-Noel Guillossou (Program Manager, WB)

Participants in this roundtable will discuss the findings and recommendations of IEG’s recent evaluation, “Improving Institutional Capability and Financial Viability to Sustain Transport.” The services provided by transportation investments are important contributors to poverty alleviation and economic growth. Over the past decade, the World Bank, International Finance Corporation (IFC), and Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) have committed about $50 billion for operations or guarantees in the transport sector, amounting to 12 percent of the World Bank Group’s total commitments and guarantee volumes. The performance of World Bank transport operations at project closure has been high—almost 89 percent are rated moderately satisfactory or better. Yet inadequate operations and maintenance after project closure —raised as an issue more than 20 years ago—continue to be a concern.

The evaluation assesses the extent to which the outcomes from transport investments supported by the World Bank Group over the past decade have been sustained, identifies the institutional and financial factors associated with sustained outcomes, and draws lessons from this experience.

 

9:00 – 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Update on Global Partnership on Social Accountability (GPSA)

Sponsor: World Bank (World Bank Institute)

Panelists: Jeff Thindwa (Manager, WBI Social Accountability Practice), Lindsay Coates (Executive Vice President, InterAction), Izabella Toth (Senior Corporate Strategist, Cordaid), Randson Mwadiwa (Secretary to the Treasury, Ministry of Finance, Malawi). CHAIR: Susan Wong (Sector Manager, Social Development, World Bank).

The panel will bring together representatives from civil society, government, and World Bank to share perspectives on key issues and opportunities in the implementation of the new Global Partnership for Social Accountability (GPSA), including progress made to date. Participants will gain an understanding of how this initiative could benefit civil society organizations working for greater transparency and accountability in developing countries. The discussion will provide an opportunity to generate insights that will shape the next steps for the GPSA as the first round of projects gets underway.

The Global Partnership for Social Accountability (GPSA) is a coalition of donors, governments and CSO partners launched by the World Bank in 2012 with the goal to improve development results by supporting capacity building for enhanced citizen feedback and participation. As part of its focus on providing strategic long-term support to civil society organizations that work on social accountability programs, the GPSA recently issued its first Call for Proposals to fund CSO projects in 12 participating countries. A Knowledge Platform on social accountability will be launched later in the year.

The session was web streamed live. Use link below to view the archived files:

Flash: http://streaming2.worldbank.org:8080/vvflash/extlive2
Streaming: mms://wbmswebcast1.worldbank.org/external-2

GPSA participants list

Presentation

11:00 – 12:30
Room: MC C1 - 110

Combating Counterfeit Medicines

Sponsor: World Bank (Legal Vice Presidency), Global Forum on Law, Justice and Development

Panelists: Jan Kleijssen (Council of Europe / CoE), Marco Musumeci (United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute / UNICRI), Aboubacar Sidiki Diakite (Guinea Ministry of Health), Hatem Ben Salem (WAITO International), Akiko Maeda, Andreas Seiter (World Bank). CHAIR: Michele Forzley (O'Neil Institute on National and Global Health Law)

Counterfeit Medicines (also referred to as spurious, falsely labeled, falsified, counterfeit medicines / SFFC) reached such a level of public health impact to become an obstacle to development, negatively affecting development of societies, and particularly the poor. Counterfeiting and similar crimes affect all medical products, whether they are generic or protected by intellectual property rights IPRs. Data from the Pharmaceutical Security Institute indicates that the illegal trade and manufacture of medicines affected at least 124 countries in 2011, and the burden is disproportionately felt in the developing world.

This panel will bring together government officials and donor agency representatives, CSO leaders to discuss the way forward in the fight against counterfeit medicines. A Community of Practice will be launched to continue the discussion after this event.

Participants lists

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Turbocharging Development with Open Data

Sponsor: World Bank (Open Government Data Working Group)

Panelists: Gavin Starks (CEO, the Open Data Institute (pre-recorded video http://www.slideshare.net/theODI/odi-overview-with-audio-narration#btnAudioPlay ), Timothy Herzog (Development Data Group, WB), Soren Gigler (Mainstreaming Open Data into Bank Operations, Innovation Labs, WB), Kaushal Jhalla (ICT-Enabled Citizen Feedback, Innovation Labs, WB), Samuel S. Lee (Open Data Demand in the context of Open Financial Data, WB), Craig Hammer (Open Data Demand Side and Media Engagement, WB), CHAIR: Amparo Ballivian (Lead Economist and Chair of the Open Government Data Group, WB)

‘Open Data’ is fundamentally about unlocking the value of data by lowering the barriers to its use, and making it freely available to a diverse audience of potential users who otherwise would not be able to benefit from it. Open Data—and in particular government/public data—can contribute significantly to a broad spectrum of public policy goals, including improved transparency and accountability, strengthened citizen participation in governance, more efficient public policy and provision of public services, as well as enhanced economic growth.

This useful resource is however largely untapped yet.
This session is geared to providing insight into the value Open Data initiatives. Expert presenters will deliver brief ‘lightning talks’ on the Social and Economic Value of Open Data using specific examples from the World Bank and global experience. Participants will then have the chance to share their experiences and to explore how ‘Open Data’ might be applied to their development priorities and challenges.
Participants will be asked to make 3-minute ‘Lightening Talks’ to address the following questions:

  • How do you use Open Data in your organization and what kind of data is the most popular?
  • What kind of data would you like to see opened?
  • What uses of data are happening in your country?

 For those unable to attend, you can watch the session live online

To access the online resources referenced in the presentations please follow this link

Participants List

Presentations:

Kaushal
Lee
Gigler
Herzog
Hammer

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

Gender Justice: An update on the World Bank’s Gender Work and Views from the Ground

Sponsors: Bank Information Center, World Bank (Gender Team)

Panelists: Jeni Klugman (World Bank Sector Director for Gender), Nelly Stromquist (University of Maryland, US), Timothy Opobo (Childfund International,Uganda), Titi Soentoro (Aksi - for Gender, Social and Ecological Justice, Indonesia), CHAIR: Sarah Aviel (US Alternate Executive Director)

How is the World Bank following up on the 2012 WDR on Gender Equality? A year after the WDR on Gender was released, panelists will discuss how this ground-breaking report has affected how the Bank works in practice. This will include an update on activities since the annual meetings in Tokyo. The panel will also consider the possible need for a gender safeguard to protect women from impacts and risks of WB investments.

Participants List

Presentations:

Klugman
Soentoro

 

11:00 – 12:00
WB – Main Complex
Preston Auditorium

Bending the Arc of Poverty

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelists: Jim Yong Kim (WB President), Kaushik Basu (WB Chief Economist), CHAIR: Lesley Wroughton (Journalist, Reuters)

The session will focus on the World Bank's development strategy, poverty eradication goals, global inequality, and the threat of climate change. You can also follow the event live via Twitter (#wblive) or via webcast.

 

12:30 – 2:00
Room: JB1 - 080
J Building
(701 18th St.)

Launch and Panel Discussion: Global Monitoring Report 2013: Rural-Urban Dynamics and the Millennium Development Goals

Sponsors: World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF)

Panelists: Maria Kiwanuka (Minister of Finance, Planning & Economic Development, Uganda); Kaushik Basu (Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, World Bank Group), Rogerio Studart (Alternative Executive Director for Brazil, World Bank Board), Seema Aziz (Founder, CARE, Pakistan), and Hugh Bredenkamp (Deputy Director, Strategy, Policy and Review, IMF)

Presenters: Jos Verbeek (Lead Author, Global Monitoring Report, The World Bank) and Lynge Nielsen (Co- author, Global Monitoring Report, IMF)

Reporting annually on progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the Global Monitoring Report details how the different regions of the developing world are doing on reducing poverty, making education accessible, improving gender disparities in education, reducing maternal and child mortality, and making safe water and sanitation facilities accessible to the poor. The report also contains new poverty estimates for 2010, and forecasts of poverty rates for 2015 (the year the MDGs expire).

The thematic focus of GMR 2013 is “Rural-Urban Dynamics and the MDGs’. With 1.3 billion additional people expected to live in the developing world’s cities by 2030, urbanization really matters. However, the vast majority of the world’s 1.2 billion poor reside in rural areas, with less access to life’s basic amenities than their urban counterparts.

During this session, the report’s lead authors will present key findings of the report, followed by a panel discussion on the role of urbanization in poverty reduction and the challenges of overcoming rural-urban disparities in development.

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 100

Citizen Voices: Taking the Agenda Forward

Sponsors: World Bank (World Bank Institute), CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation

Panelists: Caroline Anstey (Managing Director, WB), David Bonbright (Board Chair CIVICUS), Corinne Woods (Director, UN Millenium Challenge Campaign), Katrin Verclas (Manager of Innovation, National Democratic Institute), CHAIR: Mary McNeil (Senior Operations Officer, WB)

This session will discuss the findings of the recent global conference “Citizen Voices: Citizen Engagement for Enhanced Development Impact” held in Washington on March 18, 2013, co-organized by the World Bank, CIVICUS, InterAction, and Government of Finland. The conference brought together more than 160 participants from civil society, private sector, government, academia, Bank, and donor agencies to discuss the existing pool of knowledge on how to engage citizens in defining development priorities, deliver improved public services, and measure results. Of particular interest was how to incorporate the private sector’s experience in assessing consumer demand in meeting client needs, and the use of technology to scale up and transform citizen feedback mechanisms.

Participants List

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 200

Update on the Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) Work

Sponsors: New Rules for Global Finance Coalition, Independent Evaluation Office (IMF)

Panelists: Moises Shwartz (Director, IEO), Ruben Lamdany (Deputy Director, IEO), CHAIR: Jo Marie Griesgraber (Executive Director New Rules for Global Finance)

This session will follow a workshop format. We will review the IEO’s mandate, accomplishments and planned upcoming evaluations. This event will focus on how civil society organizations can provide constructive feedback and input toward the IEO's policies and activities – as a mechanism for improving and reforming the IMF. A member from the IEO External Review team will share their recent report and findings.

Presentation
Participants List

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 110

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Sponsor: Sierra Club

Panelists: Allison Archambauldt (President Earthspark International), Jigar Shah (Jigar Shah Consulting), CHAIR: Athena Ballesteros (World Resources Institute)

Today the world's population is growing at about the same rate as the population gaining access to electricity. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA) this means that in 2030 there will only be a decrease in the un-electrified population of 14% (a drop from 1.4 to 1.2 billion). What's worse, nearly 2.5 billion people today considered "electrified" receive only a few hours of electricity per day.

Unfortunately, today’s investments in energy access are heavily skewed toward traditional grid extension, with billions going to large scale centralized power projects which are often heavily polluting coal plants. Worse, according to the IEA, an over reliance on these investments at the expense of off grid clean energy investments will leave one billion of the world’s poor without energy access by 2030. Off-grid clean energy entrepreneurs are seeking up to $500 million in risk adjusted finance from the World Bank to support the growth of their sector.

This panel will discuss the state of the sector including its financial needs and the role of the World Bank.

Participants List

2:00 – 3:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

Upward Harmonization of World Bank Safeguard Policies with the Best Standards: Lessons Learned about Informed Consultations, Gender, and Financial Intermediaries

Sponsors: Aksi, Ulu Foundation, Solidaritas Perempuan, Urgewald, Friends of the Earth/US

Panelists: Titi Soentoro, Rio Ismail (Aksi), Stephanie Fried ('Ulu Foundation), Puspa Dewy (Solidaritas Perempuan), Petra Kejl (Bretton Woods Project), CHAIR: Jocelyn Medallo (Center for International Environmental Law)

At a meeting with CSOs during the World Bank’s Annual General Meeting in Tokyo in 2012, Bank President Kim made a commitment that the Bank’s review of its safeguard policies review will not result in any weakening or “dilution” of existing policies. This statement has been repeated on many occasions by other WB staff, including the safeguard policies review team. Furthermore, the Bank’s approach paper indicates the importance of considering the benefits of policy harmonization and coherence with relevant aspects of other sustainability frameworks and recognized global good practices. The review and update will take note of recent safeguard updates by other MDBs, particularly those that address both public and private sector borrowers.

This session will discuss key issues for upward harmonization for the safeguard policies review –drawing from lessons learned from achievements of other MDBs in their safeguard policy update such as ADB, from assessments of the World Bank own operations and of the CSOs engaged in monitoring the World Bank. The key issues to be explored are: informed consultation, gender, forest and the impact of recent findings regarding financial intermediaries.

Participants List

Presentations:

Soentoro
Fried
Ismail
Dewy

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: MC C1 - 110

Coalition Building on LGBT Issues

Sponsor: World Bank (World Bank Group Employee Resource Group for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Gay Staff)

Panelists: Rev. Canon Albert Ogle (President of St. Paul’s Foundation for International Reconciliation), Maxensia Nakibuuka Takirambule (Executive Director, Lungujja Community Health Caring Organization, Uganda), Rev. MacDonald Sembereka (Executive Director, MANRELA for Spirit of 76), Victor Mukasa (Human Resource Development Specialist, from Uganda), CHAIR: Philip W. Moeller (Institutional and Social Development Consultant to the World Bank)

The focus of the session is on the need to forge stronger and more inclusive coalitions at the grass roots level to advocate for increased social services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations. Faith-based groups have a special role in such coalitions, and often they have been a major provider of services on the local level. What are the positive and negative aspects of their role in service delivery relating to LGBT issues?

CSOs addressing LGBT concerns serve a constituency that is often left out of development efforts. Sometimes they face special problems because of the focus of their mission. Yet the participation of LGBT constituencies in the development process is necessary in order for development to be inclusive and effective. CSOs should work to encourage the World Bank Group and other development agencies to include LGBT issues and constituents in social assessment and monitoring efforts during the appraisal, supervision, and evaluation phases of Bank-financed projects. The session will address how this can be best achieved and discuss good practices in this regard.

Participants List

Summary Note

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Discussion on IMF Jobs and Growth Policies

Sponsors: IMF, Oxfam International

Panelists: Ranil Salgado, Hans Weisfeld (IMF), Kevin Watkins (Brookings), Emma Seery (Oxfam). Chair: Jeremy Mark (IMF)

With over 200 million people out of work and global output subdued, inclusive growth and job creation are imperatives that resonate today in every country. While world growth remains well below pre-recession levels, global employment is at its lowest in two decades, with young people and the long-term unemployed particularly hard hit. At the same time, many countries also face changing trends affecting growth and income inequality, including technological advances, globalization, and shifting demographics. This panel will bring together IMF staff and CSO leaders to discuss these global trends and what governments can do to support inclusive growth.

Participants List

Presentation:

Salgodo
Seery
Watkins

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

What Next for the Eurozone? Macroeconomic Policy and the Recession

Sponsor: Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)

Panelists: Mark Weisbrot (Co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research), Prakash Loungani (Advisor at the International Monetary Fund's Research Department), CHAIR: Jo Marie Griesgaber (Executive Director, New Rules for Global Finance Coalition)

The Eurozone is mired in its second recession in three years, and the most recent IMF projections show a decline in GDP for 2013. Unemployment has hit a record level of 11.9 percent for the region, with Greece and Spain having jobless rates of 26 percent. The risks of a serious financial crisis in the Eurozone have subsided considerably since last year, but remain significant enough to possibly affect world economic growth and employment. This forum will look at macroeconomic policy in the Eurozone, and the challenges to restoring employment and growth.

Presentations:

Weisbrot
Loungani

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Health Effects of Coal

Sponsor: Physicians for Social Responsibility

Panelists: Dr. Gazmend Zhuri (University Clinical Centre/Clinic for Lung diseases, Kosovo); Dr. Ilirjana Bajraktari (Physicians for Peace and Social Responsibility, Kosovo Affiliate); Dr. Alan Lockwood (Emeritus Professor of Neurology at the University at Buffalo, NY), Lauri Myllyvirta (Greenpeace International); Nezir Sinani (KOSID), Chair: Barbara Gottlieb (Physicians for Social Responsibility)

The World Bank is considering funding a new coal-fired power plant located just a few miles from Pristina, Kosovo’s capital city with a population of over half a million residents. In 2012 the World Bank published a paper which addresses the health impacts of Kosovo’s current pollution levels. According to the paper’s findings, 835 premature deaths, €100 million of expenditures, and over 23,000 new cases of respiratory illnesses among children are reported annually as a result of pollution, 50% of which are attributed to coal burning.

Panelists will present new research on the health impacts of coal, as well as on-the-ground experiences from physicians who work in communities affected by the current coal-fired power plants near Pristina. Greenpeace will present a new study which has found that building the proposed new power plant in accordance with the current EU standards, as planned, will result in more deaths, than building in accordance with US or Chinese standards. The panel will also discuss use of available water resources, and water pollution issues associated with the new coal plant.

Participants List

Presentations:

Bajraktari
Myllyvirta
Lockwood

5:30 – 7:00
Room: MC 10-512 (Inspection Panel Office)

Inspection Panel Reception

Sponsor: Inspection Panel (WB)

As part of the World Bank/IMF Spring Meetings 2013, the Inspection Panel is pleased to welcome you to its traditional Open House. Come meet Panel Members and Secretariat staff, learn how the Panel works, and exchange views with us. Refreshments will be served.

The Inspection Panel is an independent complaints mechanism for people who believe that they have been, or are likely to be, adversely affected by a World Bank-funded project. The Panel provides for accountability through assessment of Bank's compliance with operational policies. The process is designed to provide redress to affected people and address issues of policy non-compliance and harm.

 

5:30 – 6:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

Reception for Launch CIVICUS State of Civil Society Report

Sponsor: CIVICUS: World Alliance for Citizen Participation

Speaker: Danny Sriskandarajah (Secretary General, CIVICUS)

Join the new Secretary General of CIVICUS, Danny Sriskandarajah, previewing the launch of this year’s State of Civil Society report. With around 40 contributions from leading experts from around the world, this year’s report will provide a comprehensive account of the challenges and opportunities facing civil society. The session will include a short presentation on the report, including its special thematic focus on the enabling environment for civil society.



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Thursday, April 18

8:30 – 9:30
Room: TBC

Opportunities and Challenges to Sustainable Development - Discussion with World Bank VP for Sustainable Development

Sponsor: World Bank (Office of the VP for Sustainable Development)

Join Rachel Kyte, World Bank Vice President for Sustainable Development, for a conversation about the opportunities and challenges to sustainable development. Hear about latest developments in sustainable development at the Bank and share your perspectives.

If you are interested in participating, please respond by noon on Wednesday, April 17 to Karolina Ordon at: kordon@worldbank.org. Given limited space, priority will be given to developing country civil society representatives. One individual per organization please.

 

8:30 – 11:00
Room: MC C4 - 100 

Oil, Money & Secrecy in East Africa

Sponsors: Committee to Protect Journalists (CJP)

Panelists: Mohamed Keita (Africa Advocacy Coordinator, CPJ), Peter Wandera (Transparency International Uganda), World Bank Expert from Oil and Gas Unit (TBC), CHAIR: Steve LeVine (Washington Correspondent for Quartz and Schwartz, Fellow at the New America Foundation)

The discoveries of natural resources across East Africa have brought opportunities and challenges for the media in this region. The prospect of new oil and natural gas reserves in eastern DRC, Kenya, Uganda, South Sudan, and Tanzania has led to increasing foreign interest in Africa. However, independent international and local journalists have faced challenges in piercing official opacity surrounding critical issues, including the terms of deals with multinationals, the environmental impact of exploitation, and the extent to which social programs benefit from the reinvestment of proceeds accrued. Can these emerging oil and gas markets avoid the troubles that have long accompanied natural resource exploitation in Africa? Is it possible to fully embrace transparency and accountability without a free press?

Blog entry on the subject by Mohamed Keita

Praticipants List

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Managing Risk for Development: Discussion of the World Development Report 2014 (under preparation)

Sponsor: World Bank (World Development Report 2014 Team)

Panelists: Norman V. Loayza (Director WDR 2014), Izabela Toth (Sr Corporate Strategist CordAid, Netherlands), Sasanka Thilakasiri (Policy advisor, Oxfam International).

It is said that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Why does the development community act as if it doesn’t know this? Too often, we fight the consequences of risk and vulnerability rather than addressing their causes. Far too many risks and vulnerabilities remain ignored, until it’s too late.

The team working on the World Development Report 2014 on Managing Risk to Development hopes to see this change. The report, currently under preparation, considers many risks prevalent in developing countries, and asks: why is it that families, communities, firms, and countries so often fail to prevent and prepare for risk? What can be done to change that? How can better risk management unleash opportunity?

Participants List

Presentations:

Loayza
Thilakasiri

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 110

Reforms to Debt Limit Policy

Sponsor: IMF

Speaker: Laurence Allain (IMF)

The IMF is studying ways to strengthen the focus of its debt limits policy on debt sustainability while allowing countries to manage debt in a more flexible way. The purpose of this session is to consult with stakeholders—civil society organizations, academics, think-tanks, youth leaders, government authorities, lenders, other multilateral institutions—to get input on the design of the debt operational reforms. All this input will inform the policy reform proposal, which we intend to put to the IMF Executive Board by the end of the year.

Participants List

9:00 - 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

Defining the Boundaries of a Project: Where does Bank Accountability Stop?


Sponsor: Inspection Panel (WB)


Panelists: Alf Jerve (Chair of the Inspection Panel), Glenn Morgan (Regional Safeguards Advisor, Latin America and the Caribbean Region, World Bank ), Joshua Klemm (Africa Program Manager, Bank Information Center), CHAIR: Peter Lallas (Executive Secretary of the Inspection Panel)

 

The World Bank is accountable for impacts of projects it supports. This assumes that one can both determine the area of influence of a project as well as the causal relationship between a project and impacts. When impacts are negative, affected people may complain to the Inspection Panel. The Panel has had many cases where the ‘area of influence’ and ‘causal relationship or link’ have been key issues. Some may be inclined to take a restrictive approach, while others would like the Bank to take a more comprehensive approach to be able to leverage broader development efforts.

 

The Bank’s safeguard policies provide guidance on how to define area of influence for projects that have a physical footprint, but boundaries are often contested. Today, it is expected that an increasing share of Bank’s lending will be contributions to larger programs and budgets of governments, such as through the new Program for Results (PforR) lending instrument. What would be the area of influence and impacts attributable to such projects?

 

The Panel will share its experiences on these matters from recent cases, and the speakers will deliberate on how Bank policies help define boundaries of a project and Bank’s accountability. The discussion is relevant in the context of the review of Bank’s Safeguard Policies and management of project risks more broadly. This session would be of particular interest to CSOs and other development practitioners interested in issues of accountability of IFIs, and to those following the World Bank’s operational policy reform.

 

Presentations:

 

Morgan
Jerve
Klemm

 

11:00 - 12:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

The World Bank’s Access to Information Policy & Open Initiatives– Leading the Way Forward.

Sponsors: World Bank (External Affairs), Bank Information Center

Panelists: Paul Bermingham (Director, Operations Policy and Country Services Unit), Gregory Adams (Director of Aid Effectivenss, Oxfam America), Sophie Sirtaine (Director, Corporate Reform and Strategy, OPCS), Neil Fantom (Manager, Development Data Group), CHAIR: Sumir Lal (Manager, Bank External Affairs)

Since the launch of its Access to Information policy and the Open Data Initiative in 2010, the World Bank has adopted a three pronged approach to make strides towards greater openness. The World Bank is open about:

  • What we know (data, tools and development knowledge)
  • What we do (operations, projects, finances and commitments)
  • How we work (knowledge, partnerships, engagement platforms and solutions)

The session will provide civil society interlocutors and advocacy groups with an update on the AI Policy implementation progress since July 2010; and the direction the Bank is taking on transparency and open data initiatives, including leading roles in the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI), Open Aid Partnership, Aidflows among others.

Participants List

11:00 - 12:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

Learning and Equity in the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Sponsors: Save the Children, Women Thrive Worldwide, Center for Universal Education (Brookings Institution)

Panelists: Maker Mwangu Famba (Minister of Education, The Democratic Republic of the Congo), Christine Dranzoa (Executive Committee Board Member, Forum for African Women Educationalists), Will Paxton (Director of Education Policy and Advocacy, Save the Children UK), Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala (Minister of Finance, Federal Republic of Nigeria; Member of UN High-Level Panel on the Post-2015 Development Agenda - TBC), Elizabeth King (Director of Education, World Bank - TBC), Chernor Bah (Youth Representative to the United Nations Education First High Level Steering Committee – TBC), CHAIR: Kevin Watkins (Non-resident Senior Fellow, Center for Universal Education at Brookings)

With the 2015 MDGs deadline fast approaching, Save the Children, Women Thrive Worldwide, and the Center for Universal Education at Brookings are working collectively and with partners around the world to learn the lessons of the Millennium Development Goals and contribute to the evolution of an ambitious new global development framework.

This session provides an opportunity for high-level representatives from multiple arenas—including the Government of Nigeria, United Nations, World Bank, African civil society, and Center for Universal Education at Brookings—to discuss education priorities for the post-2015 framework. Though the specific targets and indicators have yet to be determined, there is strong consensus emerging that a global learning goal must be one critical component of the post-2015 development agenda. It will also be critical that any goal and targets ensure a stronger focus on the most marginalized children and youth and achieving more equitable school systems.

Participants List


11:00 - 12:30
Room: MC C1 - 110

Preventing Mass Atrocities Through Development Policies: A Round Table on Economic, Social and Legal Aspects

Sponsors: Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation, Bellagio Forum for Sustainable Development (US), Budapest Centre for the International Prevention of Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Panelists: Enzo M. Le Fevre Cervini (Representative of the Budapest Centre for the International Prevention of Genocide and Mass Atrocities), Dr. Juan Mendez (Professor of Law, American University and UN Special Rapporteur on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment or Punishment), Troy Alexander (Project Finance Partner, White & Case, LLP), Prof. Emilio Viano (Representative of Bellagio Forum for Sustainable Development), CHAIR: Dr.James Waller (Academic Programs Coordinator, Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation)

Mass atrocities and genocide present an ongoing threat to global development, prosperity, and stability. The movement to end mass atrocities is a nascent one that arose from the outrage after the Holocaust and the conflicts in Bosnia, Rwanda and Sudan. This movement encourages governments to mobilize to protect vulnerable populations, and to find ways to interrupt the processes that can lead to genocide or mass atrocities. Recent advancements in genocide prevention policy provide a climate for concerted action amongst international, regional, and national institutions, including development institutions.

Development processes address the structural causes of mass atrocities, including poverty and exclusion, but prevention goes beyond enforcement of non-discrimination laws. The question we hope to answer is how development programs may further contribute to the prevention of genocide and mass atrocities.

This session seeks to facilitate a dialogue on what a genocide prevention “lens” for development policy might look like when implemented in societies at risk of mass atrocity, especially in post-conflict and fragile states. The discussion will be supported by the experience of the Auschwitz Institute’s governmental and civil society partners, complemented by private attorneys familiar with development projects in the public and private sectors.

Participants List

 

12:45 - 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 200

IDA: Results and Replenishment


Sponsors: World Bank (Concessional Financing and Partnerships Vice Presidency)


Panelists: Joachim von Amsberg (Vice President for Concessional Finance and Global Partnerships, WB), Antonella Bassani (Director, IDA Resource Mobilization)

 

Join this session for a background discussion on IDA, the Bank's fund for the world's poorest countries. Hear what has been achieved so far in IDA16 (the period July 1, 2011-June 30, 2014). Discuss the road ahead for IDA and the 17th replenishment, which comes amid a rapidly changing global aid landscape and evolving developing country financing needs.

 

Participants List

 

 

12:45 - 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 100

Beyond REDD - Safeguards for Forests

Sponsors: Greenpeace and Bank Information Center (BIC)

Panelists: Bruce Jenkins (Independent Consultant & Safeguards Expert), Kenn Rapp (Forest Carbon Partnership Facility, WB), Niranjali Amerasinghe (Center for International Environmental Law), Joshua Lichtenstein (Bank Information Center), CHAIR: Susanne Breitkopf (Greenpeace)

The Cancun Agreements in 2010 set the stage for upward harmonization of social and environmental safeguards for REDD+. However, financing for REDD+ and forests is becoming increasingly fragmented, making donor safeguard harmonization more urgent than ever. The World Bank has a long history financing programs in the forest sector and is today the largest source of multilateral funding for forests. Through programs such as FCPF and FIP, the Bank has been at the forefront of supporting REDD+ efforts in tropical forest countries.

This panel will explore civil society and World Bank proposals for forest safeguards harmonization, examine ongoing efforts by the Bank to address these issues, and assess to what extent current MDB safeguards are aligned with requirements under international agreements.

Participants List

Presentations:

Jenkins
Lichtenstein
Niranjali

 

12:45 - 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 110

From Vision to Action: Youth Engagement

Sponsor: World Bank (External Affairs)

Panelists: Gary Barnabo (President of Young Professionals in Foreign Policy and Associate at Booz Allen Hamilton), Rohit Bhargava (Professor of Marketing at Georgetown University and Author of "Likeonomics"), Jacqueline Sibanda (Social Media Strategist, Results-Based Financing for Health, WB), CHAIR: Victoria Flamant (Civil Society Team, WB)

This session brings together three panelists for a conversation about the opportunities for youth leadership in a fast changing landscape, what it takes to become a respected and impactful leader, and how to leverage social media for social impact from the local to the global levels. The session will also explore how to attract funding for grassroots initiatives via online platforms.

Participants List

Presentations:

Barnabo
Sibanda

 

2:00 - 3:00
Room: MC 13 - 121

Security, Justice and Jobs: Practical approaches to link the rule of law and development in fragile situations

Sponsor: World Bank

Panelist: Jan Eliasson ( Deputy Secretary General, United Nations), Emilia Pires (Minister of Finance, Timor Leste), Anne-Marie Leroy (World Bank Senior Vice President and General Counsel)

Moderator: Caroline Anstey (World Bank Managing Director)

Fragile and conflict affected countries are a key priority for the World Bank Group’s poverty-fighting mission. Given the Post-2015 MDGs discussion and the World Bank Group's focus on fragile and conflict affected states, this session aims to highlight examples of successful programs that link rule of law and development in such countries, and to find ways to strengthen UN/WBG collaboration in these areas.

 

2:00 – 4:00
Room: MC C1 - 200

IFI Re-Engagement and Aid Coordination in Myanmar

Sponsors: IFI Watch Myanmar, Burma Environmental Working Group, Bank Information Center, World Bank, International Finance Corporation

Panelists: Liz Hlaing (Community Resource Group and IFI Watch, Myanmar), Paul Sein Twa (Karen Environmental and Social Action Network), Maw Htun Aung (Cornell University), Sean Turnell (Macquarie University), Kanthan Shankar (Myanmar Country Manager, WB) and Sergio Pimenta (East Asia and Pacific Director, IFC), Alessandro Pio (North America Regional Director, Asian Development Bank), CHAIR: Maureen Aung-Thwin (Director, OSI Burma / SE Asia Initiative)

The year 2012 marked the official re-engagement of the donor community members in Burma. Requirements have been met that enabled the World Bank Group and the Asian Development Bank to resume their normal country assistance after 25 years. Although the IMF has never stopped its formal relationships with the government, the Fund began to intensify its technical assistance such as on exchange rates and financial management. While the IFIs continue doing a range of diagnostic work and started designing projects and other reform support to the government, what constraints and opportunities do they encounter in their interim operations? In what way are they championing the effective coordination and safeguards in the flow of official aid and the engagement of the non-state actors and ethnic communities?

The discussion will address these issues by drawing on the experiences of grassroots leaders and subject matter specialists. The World Bank and IFC staff will share findings from a recent trip by World Bank Group leadership to Myanmar, and discuss plans on future engagement in the country. Discussion will follow.

Participants List

Presentation:

Htun Aung

 

2:00 - 4:00
Room: MC C1 - 100

Mobilizing International Resources for Financing Africa's Agriculture

Sponsors: African Business Roundtable

Panelists: Amara M. Konneh (Minister of Finance, Liberia), Gnounka Toure Diouf (Minister of Economic Affairs, Senegal), Sanusi Lamido Sanusi (Governor, Central Bank of Nigeria), Dr. Kanayo F. Nwanze (President, International Fund for Agricultural Development), Jean Louis Ekra (President, Afrexim), Errico "Rick" Angiuoni (Director for Africa, United States Export-Import Bank)

Agriculture continues to be a major growth driver in many countries of the world. This is particularly true in the case of developing countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America where food production provides the bulk of personal and national income as well as employment for a sizeable percentage of the population. With the world economy now on a fragile recovery from the global financial and economic crisis, the call for additional ‘growth poles’ for the world has never been louder and Africa has been recognized to play that important role.

With growth rates far beyond the global average in the last ten years and a projected GDP growth of 5% in 2013, Africa is expected to be a growth driver for the global economy. For that to happen, there is the need to bring Africa’s agriculture on a more meaningful and sustainable path with a view to unleashing the potential of that sector. A major challenge is the need to scale up the financing of agricultural projects and programs. In that regard, there is the need to develop effective innovative financing mechanisms to complement existing instruments for agricultural financing.

Since domestic resources have proven to be inadequate, there is the need to complement it with resources from the international system, particularly those designed to outlive the current financial challenges in the global economic system. This may be a huge challenge, however, given the Eurozone crisis and the weak US economic recovery.

It is against this background that the African Business Roundtable is hosting this high level panel which will bring together key stakeholders such as policy makers, agriculture practitioners, and business leaders to discuss and propose solutions for agricultural financing in Africa. Specifically, panelists will assess the progress made, reaffirm goals and commitments, share best practice and lessons learned, and identity actions and initiatives to overcome them.

Participants List

 

2:00 - 3:30
Room: MC C1 - 110

Revising IMF Guidelines on Consultations

Sponsors: IMF

Speaker: Dr. Bessma Momani (Associate Professor, University of Waterloo, Canada, and Non-Resident Fellow, Brookings Institution, United States)

This session will provide an IMF Consultant, tasked with revising the IMF Guide for Staff Relations with Civil Society, the opportunity to listen and incorporate the feedback of CSOs on their perceptions for improving the IMF Guidelines. In order to frame the discussion, the Consultant will present findings from a study of good consultation practices in other organizations, preliminary findings from interviews with IMF staff on their perceptions about their consultation approaches, and reflections from a desk research.

The session will be a candid information gathering exercise geared to: learn about how CSO want to be engaged in IMF missions; what form of engagement with CSOs is deemed successful and effective; hear reflections about effective means of engagement with other international organizations; and to learn how the IMF can improve the format, timing, and substance of consultations with CSOs. This session will be a key source for incorporating CSO ideas and reflections in revising the guidelines.

 

2:00 - 5:30
Room: MC C2 - 142

The Power of Openness

Sponsors: World Bank (External Affairs), Bank Information Center (BIC)

This in-depth learning event will address how the World Bank’s Open Development initiative – part of the business modernization and reforms process – is fostering the World Bank’s commitment to transparency, accountability, and results.

Various Bank data platforms and databases will be presented including: Open Development Data; Open Access Policy & Open Knowledge Repository; Open Projects & Operations; World Bank Finances; Mapping for Results and Citizen Engagement; and Open Government Data. CSOs attending this session will gain a better understanding of Open Development approach, linkages between various open initiatives, and the Bank’s role in it. The session will feature guided demos and interactive presentations. Registration is required.

Space is limited and preference will be given to non-Washington based participants. Please RSVP to Sahana Roy (ssenroy@worldbank.org) by Friday, April 12, 2013. Please include your full name, the name of your organization, and the country where you are based. We will inform registered participants at least two days before the event.

 

4:00 - 5:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

Justice for Forests: A Call to Action

Sponsors: Ugerwald, Ulu Foundation

Panelists: Rio Ismail (AKSI, Indonesia), Puspa Dewi (Solidaritas Perempuan, Indonesia), Stephanie Fried (Ulu Foundation, U.S.), Korinna Horta (Urgewald, Germany), Jean Pesme (World Bank), CHAIR: Titi Soentoro (AKSI, Indonesia)

This Policy Session will emphasize the importance of following the money in the forest sector. Speakers of the Panel will present the recommendations of the World Bank’s Justice for Forest Report concerning the need for integrating criminal justice efforts in forest strategies, provide specific examples of the FIP (Forest Investment Program) and Anti-Money Laundering measures in Indonesia and summarize the need for the World Bank to adopt a new approach to forests.

Participants List

Presentation:

Jean Pesme

 

4:00 - 5:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

The new .NGO and .ONG Domains: The Future of the Internet and the Global NGO Community

Sponsors: AMGlobal Consulting

Panelists: Brian Cute (CEO of the Public Interest Registry, Andrew Mack (Principal and Founder of AMGlobal Consulting )

The upcoming years of 2013 and 2014 will see major changes in the Internet space, as ICT infrastructure and access across the globe continue to improve and as over a thousand new “Top Level Domains” will be introduced. Among them will be two new extensions – .NGO and .ONG – designed specifically to serve the global NGO/CSO community.

Join Brian Cute, CEO of the Public Interest Registry – the non-profit that runs .ORG and is launching .NGO – and Andrew Mack for a wide-ranging discussion on the changes and the significant opportunities for NGOs in an expanding online world. The session will explore three issues:

  • How NGOs can leverage these changes to better connect with partners, improve visibility, attract new funding and generally foster a greater sense community;
  • The benefits and challenges of creating an NGO-focused/NGO-only online space; and,
  • The opportunities for NGOs/CSOs themselves to play a leadership role in helping develop and manage these new online communities.

Participants List

Presentation:

Cute

 

6:30 – 9:00
WB – Main Complex
Wolfensohn Atrium

Girl Rising

Sponsor: World Bank

Conversation with UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, film director Richard Robbins, actress Freida Pinto, and other guests, and moderated by CNN's Jake Tapper. This will be followed by screening of the “Girl Rising” film which tells the stories of 9 extraordinary girls from 9 countries, written by 9 celebrated writers, and narrated by 9 renowned actors including Cate Blanchett, Salma Hayek, Liam Neeson, and Meryl Streep.

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Friday, April 19

9:00 - 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Revitalizing the Fiscal Transparency Agenda

Sponsors: IMF

Panelists: Timothy Irwin, Richard Hughes (IMF)

The IMF launched on December 7, 2012, a consultation with governments, civil society, academics, and private sector stakeholders to gather ideas for the revision of its Code of Good Practices on Fiscal Transparency. The on-line and face-to-face consultations process took place in February 2013. After this first round of consultation, the IMF has prepared a revised draft of the Code of Good Practices and Manual on Fiscal Transparency, which will form the basis for a second round of consultation in CSOs Policy Forum, 2013. The IMF plans to submit final versions of the new Code and Manual to its Executive Board for approval and publication in late 2013.

Participants List

Presentation:

Hughes

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 110

Update and Discussion with CAO Staff

Sponsor: Compliance Advisor Ombudsman / CAO (IFC)

Panelists: Meg Taylor (Vice President and the CAO team)

The CAO team will provide an update on issues trending in their casework, related to land, labor, and financial intermediaries, among others, followed by an open discussion with CSOs on topics of interest.

Participants List

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

Turning Ideas Into Action: Implementing the Updated OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises

Sponsors: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

Panelists: Sharan Burrow (General Secretary, International Trade Union Confederation), Adam Greene (Vice President, Labor Affairs/Corporate Responsibility & Governance, U.S. Council for International Business), Marie-France Houde (Senior Economist, OECD Secretariat), Joseph Wilde-Ramsing (Senior Researcher, OECD Watch), CHAIR: Alan Yu (United States National Contact Point for the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises)

The OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises (the Guidelines) are the only government-backed set of recommendations on responsible business conduct in existence today. Addressed by governments to multinational enterprises (MNEs) operating in or from adhering countries, the Guidelines cover all areas of business ethics, including employment and labour, human rights and environment. 44 countries that account for a large majority of world's foreign direct investment currently adhere to the Guidelines. The Guidelines are also the only international corporate responsibility instrument with a built-in conflict resolution mechanism. Adhering countries are obliged to set up National Contact Points (NCPs) that are tasked with furthering the effectiveness of the Guidelines by undertaking promotional activities, handling inquiries and providing a mediation and conciliation platform for resolving issues that arise from the alleged non-observance of the Guidelines.

The Guidelines were last updated in 2011 through a consensus-based multi-stakeholder process. Main changes include a new human rights chapter, adoption of risk-based due diligence as the baseline responsibility of MNEs in many areas of business ethics, extended application to global supply chains and business relationships, clearer and reinforced procedures to strengthen the role of NCPs, and inclusion of a proactive agenda to assist MNEs in identifying and responding to risks in their global operations and supply chains that have the potential for adverse impacts if not addressed. This session will encompass several key themes from the first year of implementation of the updated Guidelines, including lessons learned, efforts to improve NCP mediation capacities, proactive agenda projects in the financial and extractive sectors, and engagement with non-adherent countries.

Reference documents:

Participants List

 

10:00 – 12:00
Room: U 12 – 400
(1800 G St, NW)

Open House by MIGA Managers

Sponsor: Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA)

This session will provide an opportunity for CSO representatives to meet with MIGA staff to learn more about MIGA and to discuss any issues of concern. Any questions may be directed to Cara Santos Pianesi at csantospianesi@worldbank.org.

 

11:00 – 12:10
WB – Main Complex
Preston Auditorium

Global Voices on Poverty

Sponsors: World Bank, United Nations

Panelists: Jim Yong Kim (WB President), Ban Ki-moon (UN Secretary-General)

This will be an interactive conversation with the Bank President, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, other opinion makers, and a global online audience to discuss the post-MDGs agenda and what #ittakes to end poverty. You are encouraged to submit questions via Twitter (#ittakes) or watch the event via webcast.

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Dissecting the IMF/FSB Early Warning Exercise

Sponsors: Centre for International Governance Innovation, New Rules for Global Finance

Panelists: Dustyn Lanz, Skyler Brooks, Warren Clarke, and Michael Cockburn (CIGI), Nathan Coplin (New Rules for Global Finance), CHAIR: Dr. Bessma Momani (CIGI)

At the end of the London summit in April of 2009, the G20 saw fit to enhance the scope and powers of the Financial Stability Forum and to rename the organization as the Financial Stability Board. The objective of the board is to 'coordinate the work of national authorities and address financial vulnerabilities.’ To this end, Article 2 (h) states that the FSB is to work in conjunction with the IMF in conducting early warning exercises. Given its systemically sensitive nature, little is known of the processes and outputs of the exercise.

This session is meant to dissect the FSB and the early warning exercise, discuss with CSOs the challenges inherent in the process, highlight areas of concern, and seek CSO feedback on proposed recommendations to streamline and improve the efficacy of the exercise.

Participants List

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

The Human Rights Policy in German Development Cooperation & the World Bank’s Safeguard Review

Sponsors: Ugerwald, German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)

Panelists: Ralf Wyrwinski (Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development / BMZ), Anders Zeijlon (Nordic Trust Fund at the World Bank), Jessica Evans (Human Rights Watch), CHAIR: Korinna Horta (Urgewald)

In 2011 the BMZ adopted a new Human Rights Strategy that is binding for bilateral cooperation. While it recognizes that the World Bank and other multilateral agencies consider it to be problematic to explicitly adopt a human rights approach, the BMZ’s Human Rights Strategy is committed to promote such an approach at these institutions.

This Panel will present and discuss the BMZ’s Human Rights Strategy, the Nordic Trust Fund’s efforts in promoting a human rights debate at the Bank, an NGO perspective on the need for a human rights approach at the World Bank, and why this discussion matters for the Bank’s ongoing Safeguard Review.

Participants List

Presentation:

Wyrwinski

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 200

IFI Policies & Practice: How to Fill the Gender Gaps

Sponsors: Aksi!, Gender Action, and the Heinrich Boell Foundation

Panelists: Liane Schalatek (Heinrich Boell Foundation), Titi Soentoro (Aksi!), Elaine Zuckerman (Gender Action), CHAIR: Claire Lauterbach (Gender Action)

Gender equality is a core IFI development objective to achieve poverty eradication. However, grassroots reports and testimonies show that women too often do not benefit from IFI-financed development efforts. Many IFI projects still neglect and often violate women’s rights.

This Panel explores gaps between IFI gender policies and realities faced by women and men in IFI client countries. It examines ways to overcome challenges to improving and implementing gender policies.

The Panel also assesses the gender implications of the current World Bank safeguard policies review. It asks how the safeguard policies can protect women’s rights from operational impacts and risks. Moreover, the panel considers fundamental IFI approaches necessary to achieve genuine gender equality and make IFI interventions gender-responsive.

Participants List

Presentation:

Soentoro

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 100

Mobilizing Climate Investment: The Role of Climate Finance in Scaling-up Low-carbon Investment

Sponsor: World Resources Institute

Panelists: Louise Brown (World Resources Institute), John Morton (Overseas Private Investment Corporation), Claudio Alatorre (Inter-American Development Bank), Alan Miller (International Finance Corporation), Irfa Ampri (Ministry of Finance Indonesia), Hoai Huynh (ICF International), Migara Jayawardena (World Bank), CHAIR: Cliff Polycarp (World Resources Institute)

This panel will explore how the international community can scale-up climate related investments in developing countries. It will discuss how, through “readiness” activities, climate finance can help create an enabling environment for investment, and how public finance instruments can be effectively targeted to leverage private sector investments.

Panellists representing government, industry, financial institutions, and civil society will discuss the role of climate finance in catalyzing climate investment, and provide recommendations for providers of international climate finance, most pertinently the Green Climate Fund. The discussion aims to raise awareness among national policy makers and international development finance institutions of the role of climate finance in creating attractive investment conditions and leveraging private funds.

Participants List 

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 110

An Update and Briefing on GAFSP

Sponsor: IFC

Panelists: Geeta Sethi (Head of the Coordination Unit of GAFSP), Laura Mecagni (Head of Private Sector Window of GAFSP),
Soc Banzuela (Alternate Asian CSO Representative on the GAFSP)

The session will provide an update on the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program (GAFSP) with a particular focus on recent private sector window projects.

Participants List

 

1:00 – 2:00
IMF HQ2
Room: TBC

BBC Hard Talk on Global Economy

Sponsor: British Broadcasting Company (BBC)

Featuring Christine Lagarde (Managing Director, IMF); to be moderated by Stephen Sackur (BBC HARDtalk)

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: MC C1-110

Consultations: Learning from Practice

Sponsors: World Bank (Operations Communications Team)

Panelists: Sumir Lal (Manager, Operational Communications), Ida Mori (Consultations Team Lead, Operational Communications), Chad Dobson (Executive Director, Bank Information Center), CHAIR: Cyprian Fisiy (Director, Social Development)

Ongoing dialogue between the World Bank and stakeholders - government, civil society, media, academia, private sector, and citizens - is a critical aspect of the Bank’s work. Consultations are being held at all levels of World Bank engagement and it is through this multi-stakeholder dialogue that the Bank finds and helps implement more effective solutions to local, regional, and global development challenges. The World Bank is developing a number of products that will improve the quality and consistency of World Bank-led consultations.

A Consultation Practice Note will define principles, processes, and practices that the World Bank commits to when conducting consultations. This Practice Note will be the basis of an internal staff toolkit that will help Bank staff to carefully plan effective consultations. A Consultation Web Hub will serve as a one-stop access point for stakeholders to learn about all past, ongoing, and future consultations, and to participate in those consultation that they want to contribute to.

The purpose of this session is to introduce the efforts being undertaken by the Bank and the products it is developing to improve consultation practice. Participants are invited to comment on these products and discuss how they should be designed to be most useful. We especially welcome the experiences participants have had with Bank consultations to inform this discussion.

Participants List

2:00 – 3:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

Drawing Lessons from the Safeguard Standards of other Multilateral Development Banks

Sponsors: American University-College of Law, AKSI-Indonesia, World Resources Institute, Bank Information Center, ‘Ulu Foundation

Panelists: Alessandro Pio (Asian Development Bank), Reidar Kvam (International Finance Corporation), Gaia Larsen (World Resources Institute), Charles Di Leva (World Bank (TBC), CHAIR: David Hunter (American University)

This discussion will focus on the emerging lessons from the safeguard policies of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the International Finance Corporation (IFC) and the World Bank. The conversation will pay attention to three important areas of safeguard standards 1) applicability of the policy; 2) clarity on Bank and client responsibilities; and 3) approach to the use of country systems. By exchanging the comparative perspectives on both the strengths and challenges of different safeguard standards, this session seeks to further inform the current review process of the World Bank’s social and environmental policies.

Participants List

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Land Investment Reforms at the World Bank Group – Opportunities to Strengthen Tenure and Transparency of Land Deals.

Sponsor: Oxfam, Inclusive Development International (IDI), Human Rights Watch, Rights and Resources Initiative.

Panelists: David Pred (IDI), Jessica Evans (HRW), Hannah Stoddart (Oxfam), World Bank / IFC (TBC), CHAIR: Andy White (RRI)

The increasing global land rush and the implications on food security are well documented, as many rich countries try to secure their food supplies and investors see land as a good long-term bet. All too often, forced evictions of poor farmers are a consequence of large-scale land acquisitions in developing countries, where poor standards have caused involuntary displacement, dispossession, and suffering.

The World Bank Group (WBG) has an important role to play as an investor in land, as an advisor to developing country governments through land administration programs and other investment climate advice, and as a standard setter for others in land governance, community consent, and transparency. This event will discuss the potential for a reform agenda at the World Bank that can help to ensure the highest standards in relation to land governance, administration, and acquisition. It will cover:

  • Safeguards Review – the opportunity for a ‘land’ safeguard
  • Voluntary Guidelines on land tenure – the role of the World Bank in implementation
  • Land administration – how to review the Bank’s portfolio
  • Transparency – upholding the most rigorous standards for agribusiness and land-related investments

Participants List

 

2:00 - 4:00
Room: MC 4 - 800

Discussion on Independent Review of Doing Business Report

Sponsors: Independent Panel on Doing Business Report Review

Panelists: Chairman Trevor Manuel and Members of the Independent Panel

On the 10th Anniversary of the Doing Business Report, World Bank Group President Jim Kim, appointed an independent panel, chaired by South African Minister Trevor Manuel, to review the report and provide recommendations on the value and effectiveness of the Report as well as its methodology. The Panel has conducted a consultation process and wishes to hear comments and views from those attending the Spring Meetings to inform their work. The Panel is particularly interested in hearing views on the purpose and contribution of the DBR, its methodology and the impact and influence of the Report.

 

2:00 – 4:00
IFC
(2121 Pennsylvania Ave.)
Room: L-106

Discussion of CAO Financial Markets Audit

Sponsors: International Finance Corporation (IFC)

Panelists: Henrik Linders (Consultant, Compliance Advisor / Ombudsman), James Scriven (Director, Financial Markets Department, IFC), and Bill Bulmer (Director, Environment, Social, and Governance Department, IFC)

This session will focus on the CAO's recent audit of IFC financial intermediary investments. Panelists from the CAO and IFC's Financial Markets and Environment, Social, and Governance Departments will present their perspectives on the report, implications for IFC’s future work, and report recommendations. This will be followed by a general discussion.

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: MC C1 - 110

Dialogue on Managing Forests for Sustainable Development: Lessons Learned from a Decade of World Bank Group Experience

Sponsors: Independent Evaluation Group / IEG (World Bank)

Panelists: Stoyan Tenev (Manager, IEG), Lauren Kelly (Evaluation Officer, IEG, WB), CHAIR: Marvin Taylor-Dormond (Director, IEG)

This session invites participants to discuss the findings of IEG’s forest evaluation, “Managing Forests for Sustainable Development: Lessons Learned from a Decade of World Bank Group Experience,” in the context of the evolving state of forests, forest management, and the role of the World Bank Group. In 2002, the World Bank Group shifted its approach in the forest sector by putting poverty alleviation and sustainable economic development on equal footing with conservation. A decade into its implementation, IEG evaluated the progress made and the results of its approach.

This highly participatory evaluation involved a complete portfolio review of 289 World Bank projects, 56 IFC investments, 44 advisory service operations, and three MIGA projects. The evaluation team also interviewed international and national nongovernmental organizations, and conducted field visits with civil society organizations and project beneficiaries in 13 countries including Brazil, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Indonesia. In addition, the team gathered feedback from tropical timber associations, certification entities, independent monitoring groups, forest enterprises, and conducted interviews at the Racewood Conference in the Republic of Congo.

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Developing a World Bank Group Strategy


Sponsors: World Bank (Change Management Team)


Panelists: Christian Grossmann (Director, Corporate Strategy, IFC),
Jaime Saavedra (Director, Poverty Reduction and Equity, WB), Linda Van Gelder (Director, Strategy and Operations, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network, WB), Marcus Williams (Chief Officer, Strategy, Communications, and Partnerships, MIGA), Chair: Maninder Gill (Director of Operations and Strategy, Senior Vice Presidency for Change Management).

 

One of the items for discussion at this Saturday's meeting of the Development Committee is the paper, titled "A Common Vision for the World Bank Group," which outlines the direction of the World Bank Group going forward. The paper proposes for endorsement of the Development Committee two goals to guide the World Bank Group in its mission: ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity, pursuing both of these goals in an environmentally, socially and fiscally sustainable way.

 

It also seeks the endorsement of the Development Committee of the building blocks underpinning the development of a Strategy for the World Bank Group and the change process to support it, which builds on ongoing modernization and reform initiatives in IBRD/IDA, IFC and MIGA.


During this session, participants will have an opportunity to learn more about both the goals and the work around the development of the WBG strategy and contribute their views and questions to the team.

 

Presentation
Participants List

 

 

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

IMF Reform in Developing Country Perspective: Legitimacy, Policy And Roles of the Fund

Sponsors: Bretton Woods Project, REBRIP, Public Services International

Panelists: Paulo Nogueira Batista (IMF Executive Director for Brazil), Daniel Bradlow (Head of International Economic Relations, Reserve Bank of South Africa), Amar Bhattacharya (Director, Intergovernmental Group of Twenty Four / G-24 on International Monetary Affairs and Development), CHAIR: Lesley Wroughton (Senior Correspondent, Reuters)

We will explore the IMF governance reform process through the perspectives of developing countries and examine the extent to which the Fund’s existing asymmetrical governance structure, favouring rich countries and in particular allowing European nations to be over-represented, is not only a problem of legitimacy but crucial to understanding problems with Fund lending, policy positions and its global role in the aftermath of an international financial crisis and economic recession whose effects have been highly uneven and persistent. Legitimacy of the Fund is not simply a question of enhancing its efficacy as the Fund’s management asserts; correcting the democratic deficit in the IMF’s governance by meaningfully increasing the voice, representation and voting power of developing countries is critical to the democratization of global economic governance.

The panel will examine the record of recent IMF policies, the extent to which they are beholden to the prevailing governance structure which privileges rich nations and whether realistic reform goals will be sufficient to build IMF credibility and sustain its relevance in the eyes of its membership and stakeholders. Our panellists will consider whether the IMF’s unprecedented role in the Troika of eurozone lenders, its apparent shift to more accommodating positions on capital flows management or austerity policy (in the ‘fiscal multipliers debate), and even the recent accusations of anti-China bias evidenced in a recent Independent Evaluation Office report would have played out differently in a reformed governance environment.

Participants List

 

5:00 – 6:30
Room: MC C2 - 800

The Resilience Dialogue - Disaster And Climate Resilience In The Post-2015 Development Framework

Sponsor: World Bank (Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery)

Disasters and climate risks were not addressed as part of the original framework of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). However, the painful experience of the past years has shown that resilience is a necessary ingredient for the achievement of poverty reduction and sustainable development goals, and should therefore be integrated in the development framework that will replace the MDGs. At the 2013 WBG-IMF Spring Meetings, the European Union, the Government of Japan, USAID, and the World Bank/GFDRR are hosting the fourth round of the Resilience Dialogue series to explore how disaster and climate resilience can feature in the post-2015 development framework.

 

6:00 – 7:30
WB Main Complex
Wolfensohn Atrium

CSO Reception

Sponsors: IMF (External Relations), World Bank (External Affairs)

Co-hosted by External Affairs (WB) and External Relations (IMF) Departments, and remarks by Cyril Muller (EXT Vice President, WB) and Gerry Rice (EXR Director, IMF).

Come meet with Bank and IMF staff, and mingle with other CSO representatives.


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Saturday, April 20

9:00 - 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

G7+ New Deal Discussion on Resilience

Sponsors: Alliance for Peacebuilding, Cordaid

Panelists: Georges Tshionza Mata (Coordonnateur Régional, Projet de Renforcement des Capacités de la Société Civile dans la Prévention et la Gestion des Conflits, Congo DRC), Erin McCandless (Executive Editor, Journal of Peacebuilding and Development, United States), Jasper Cummeh (Senior Policy Director, Actions for Genuine Democratic Alternative, Liberia), Mahbouba Seraj (Chairperson, Afghan Women Network, Afghanistan), Rita Martin (Director, EVE Organization, South Sudan), Larry Attree (Acting Head of Policy, Saferworld, United Kingdom), CHAIR: Melanie Greenberg (President and CEO, Alliance for Peacebuilding, United States)

A central challenge in the post-2015 debates is how to weave concepts of inclusive governance, peace building, and violence reduction into the post-MDG framework. The New Deal offers valuable lessons for all countries in how to build peace, develop strong institutions, and how to measure progress in these areas. Rooted in communities, civil society groups have unique expertise in building resilience from the ground up, and engaging with their governments in these processes. Since Busan, CSOs have been active in New Deal implementation, including fragility assessments and the development of shared and country-specific indicators.

Lessons from this experience can benefit the development of the Post-2015 Goals. Viable indicators, for example, can set incentives for reducing violence and fuel drivers of peace. Civil society experts from DRC, South Sudan, Liberia, and Afghanistan will explain how the lessons from New Deal pilot states can inform Post-2015 processes in support of peaceful, resilient societies.

Participants List

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Financial Stability Board-Views from Insiders and From Campaigners

Sponsor: New Rules for Global Finance

Panelists: Turalay Kenc (Deputy Governor, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey), H.E. Dr. Hasan (Deputy Governor, Central Bank of Jordan), Michael Taylor (FSB Secretariat Staff), Grant Spencer (Deputy Governor, Reserve Bank of New Zealand), Ajith Nivard Cabraal (Governor, Central Bank of Sri Lanka), Michael Taylor (FSB Secretariat Staff), Lori Wallach (Director, Global Trade Watch, Public Citizen), CHAIR: Jo Marie Griesgraber (Executive Director, New Rules for Global Finance Coalition)

The objective of this event will be to bring together the FSB secretariat staff, government representatives, think-tanks, and civil society organizations to discuss the major challenges in global financial reform and its relationship with development goals. Specifically to discuss derivatives reform, banking regulations, financials services (macro-prudential policies), sovereign debt (secondary bond markets), and transparency/accountability of the G-SIBs and the financial system. In addition, this event will examine the functions and responsibilities of the FSB and its Regional Consultative Groups (RCG).

Participants List

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: MC C1 - 110

After Recent Court Decisions: How can Sovereign Debt Workouts become Fair, Comprehensive and Reliable

Sponsors: Jubilee USA, Bred for the World (Germany)

Panelists: Ana Gelpern (American University), Adrian Cosentino (Ministry of the Economy Argentina), Sean Hagan (IMF Legal Department – TBC), Eric LeCompte (Executive Director, Jubilee USA),
CHAIR: Eva Hanfstaengl (Bread for the World, Germany)

While the spectacular European sovereign debt crisis has, once again, highlighted the need for more comprehensive and efficient sovereign debt workouts, some recent developments seem to indicate that crisis resolution is rather becoming even more complex and fragmented. For a long time, sovereign immunity has protected sovereigns from having their assets seized after debt workouts they have agreed with or enforced upon their creditors. The NML Capital Ltd vs. Argentina case may allow the attachment of regular payment streams to majority creditors who had agreed to a restructuring of their claims in order to pay holdouts and vulture investors.

A tribunal of the International Center for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) at the World Bank, which usually arbitrates disputes between direct foreign investors and host governments, recently decided it had jurisdiction to hear claims by purchasers of Argentine bonds, considering the bonds as investments under ICSID's rules and regulations. Beginning to arbitrate creditor claims at ICSID or even ad hoc arbitration panels under bilateral investment treaties seems a challenge to possible other initiatives from some governments and international bodies to resolve external debt difficulties by establishing comprehensive debt workout procedures.

Such developments would reduce policy space for resolving debt crises in the public interest in the debtor and often also in creditor countries. The deficiencies of the current sovereign debt regime have delayed resolution of sovereign debt crises through the last decades. Will these decisions make it worse? Which new challenges do they pose for the various approaches towards establishing a sovereign debt workout mechanism that allows for a fair burden-sharing, taking into account the needs of social development in the debtor countries?

 Participants List

 

9:00 - 12:00
Room: JB1 – 080
(701 18th St.)

Preliminary Report Out on Phase I of the Safeguards Review Consultations

Sponsor: World Bank (Operations Policy and Country Services, Safeguards Team)

Panelists: Kyle Peters (Vice President, Operations Policy and Country Services, WB), Paul Bermingham (Director, Operational Risk Management, WB), Motoko Aizawa (Advisor to the Sustainable Development Network, WB), Stephen Lintner (Senior Technical Advisor on Operational Risk Management, WB), Charles di Leva (Chief Counsel, Environmental and International Law, WB), Colin Scott (Lead Social Development Specialist on Operational Risk Management, WB). CHAIRS: Sumir Lal (Manager, Operations Communications, WB), Richard Burrett (Cambridge University Programme for Sustainability Leadership)

Please join members of the Safeguards Review and Update team to discuss what they have been hearing through the course of the first phase of the consultation process. The team has consulted with a wide range of external stakeholders in more than 30 countries and has received extensive and valuable input online. The Safeguards Review Team members will be joined by some of the experts who have participated in the emerging areas expert focus group meetings. These include meetings on: land tenure and natural resources management; free, prior, and informed consent of Indigenous Peoples; labor and occupational health and safety; disability; climate change; human rights; and gender.

* Simultaneous Interpretation was provided in French, Arabic and Spanish

For meeting agenda, video recording, participants list, presentations and other materials, visit the Safeguard website.

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

From the Arab Revolutions to Global Austerity Trends

Sponsors: Third World Network (TWN) and the Arab NGO Network for Development

Panelists: Mahinour El Badrawi (Egyptian Center for Economic and Social Rights / ECESR, Cairo, Egypt), Isabel Ortiz (Initiative for Policy Dialogue, Columbia University, New York), Manuel F. Montes (Senior Advisor on Finance and Development, The South Centre, Geneva), Kinda Mohamadieh (Arab NGO Network for Development / ANND, Beirut, Lebanon), IMF Representative (TBC), CHAIR: Bhumika Muchhala (TWN).

The world has been shaken by outbreaks of civil unrest in response to the combined and lingering effects of high unemployment, worsening living conditions, and eroding confidence in governments. In the aftermath of the Arab revolutions, many countries in the region are facing serious balance of payments problems, mounting external debt, and countries such as Egypt are facing record-low foreign exchange reserves and entering into agreements with the IMF. Contrary to public perception, austerity measures are not limited to Europe; in fact, many adjustment measures feature most prominently in developing countries. According to IMF data, 119 countries will be adjusting public expenditures in 2013, increasing to 131 countries in 2014 and the trend will continue at least until 2016.

  • Some key questions that this panel will try to address are:
    Are the fiscal, monetary, tax and investment policies being considered by governments facilitating, or hindering countries in the Arab and other regions in building an inclusive economy and supporting socio-economic recovery?
  • Will public expenditure for the strengthening of education, health, and other social sectors be safeguarded or slashed?
  • How is chronic and high unemployment and high food and fuel prices being addressed?

Participants List

Presentation:

Ortiz

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

Measuring the Performance of African Think Tanks

Sponsors: World Bank (Africa Region)

Panelists: Frannie Léautier (Executive Secretary, African Capacity Building Foundation (Zimbabwe), Julie LaFrance (Senior Program Specialist, International Development Research Centre, Canada), James G. McGann (Director, Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program, University of Pennsylvania), Julia Clarke (Policy Analyst, Center for Global Development, United States), CHAIR: Shanta Devarajan (Chief Economist, Africa Region, WBG)

Think tanks are important civil society organizations from both a demand and supply side perspective. On the supply side, think tanks are thought to generate independent policy research that produces proposals and recommendations which decision-makers can use as inputs in the process of developing public policy. On the demand side, think tanks’ products – studies, reports, policy briefs – can help improve the level and quality of public discourse around key policy issues affecting society, thereby giving voice to advocacy groups and ultimately making governments more accountable for their policy choices. Think tanks, therefore, can exert a strong influence over both the debate and eventual policy choices.

As the development sector moves towards a culture of results, the measurement of think tank performance, effectiveness, and impact assumes greater significance. However, it remains a challenge. This session brings together two key institutions that support African think tanks – the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) and the Canadian International Development Research Centre / Think Tank Initiative (IDRC/TTI) – and others who have been working on the measurement of think tank performance, to consider what metrics make sense when applied to African think tanks, given the complex and sometimes opaque nature of the policy process in many African countries.

Participants List

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 100

Labor at the World Bank Group

Sponsors: International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), Independent Syndicate of Energy of Kosovo, Bank Information Center

Panelists: Pamela Gomez (International Trade Union Confederation), Izet Mustafa (Independent Syndicate of Energy of Kosovo), Matthew Fischer-Daly (Cotton Campaign), International Labor Organization (TBC)

Panelists will discuss implications of the 2013 World Development Report on Jobs for the World Bank Group's advisory work and lending. Labor representatives and advocates will share experiences from the ground, and discuss the need for better labor assessments and transparency of WBG-funded projects.

Participants List

 

12:45 – 2:00
Room: MC C1 - 200

Presentation of the UN Special Rapporteur on Adequate Housing: Financial and Housing Crises, the Bank’s Safeguards, and the Right to Adequate Housing

Sponsor: Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)

Panelists: Raquel Rolnik (United Nations Special Rapporteur on Adequate Housing), CHAIR: David Pred (Managing Associate, Inclusive Development International)

Ms. Raquel Rolnik is the United Nations Special Rapporteur on adequate housing which is considered a component of the right to an adequate standard of living and the right to non-discrimination. Ms. Rolnik undertook an official visit to the World Bank Group in 2010, and she presented the findings and recommendations from this visit, which focused on the Bank’s safeguards policies, at the 22nd Session of the Human Rights Council. She also presented her main findings and recommendations as an official submission to the Bank's safeguards policies review process. This session will allow Ms. Rolnik to present and discuss these findings with participants.

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: MC C1 - 100

The Challenges of Advancing Sustainability at the World Bank

Sponsors: World Resources Institute (WRI)

Panelists: Milap Patel (World Resources Institute), Jane Ebinger (World Bank), Steve Herz (Sierra Club), William Bulmer (International Finance Corporation), Daniel Morrow (George Washington University), CHAIR: Roland Widmer ( World Resources Institute)

This panel aims to reflect on some of the major sustainability challenges facing the World Bank through an exploration of two WRI research areas: a portfolio analysis on 2012 projects, and the interaction between country systems and World Bank safeguard approaches. This discussion will build upon evidence from World Bank projects, approaches, and policies as they have been applied in developing countries. It will also provide an opportunity to discuss different perspectives on how the World Bank will play a role in advancing core concepts of sustainability in developing economies.

As the issue of sustainability – through the management of social and environmental risks to populations and the advancement of climate issues – has become even more central and complementary to the core Bank mandate of reducing poverty, this panel will serve as a timely look at some of the ways in which sustainability is advanced by the institution, and the challenges therein.

Participants List

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: MC C1 - 200

Civil Society Strategy Session on Doing Business Review

Sponsors: Oxfam, CAFOD, Center of Concern, ITUC, Bretton Woods Project

Panelists: Pamela Gomez (ITUC), Christina Chang (CAFOD)

This will be an internal civil society update and strategy session on the independent Doing Business review. The Doing Business report has a huge influence on private sector development strategies in low income countries and implications for important policy issues such as tax, labour, land and pro-poor growth.

The review will also have implications for the Banks plans to extend DB tools to agriculture, with consequences for small holder agriculture and food security. If you wish to attend the session, please contact cchang@cafod.org.uk

 


Last updated: 2013-05-23




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