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2013 Annual Meetings - Civil Society Program

 

Civil Society Program
Washington, DC
October 7 - 12, 2013

The Civil Society Program will be held from Monday, October 7 to Saturday, October 12, prior to and during the 2013 Annual Meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank Group (WBG). It is organized by the Bank and Fund Civil Society Teams, and will bring together IMF and WBG staff, CSO representatives, government officials, academics, and others to exchange views and dialogue on a wide range of topics.

The CS Program will comprise CSO Orientation sessions on the IMF and WBG, CSO Roundtable with Executive Directors, CSO Townhall and Reception with the heads of the WBG and IMF, and a Civil Society Policy Forum with an expected 60 policy dialogue sessions on such issues as climate change, fiscal policies, post-MDGs agenda, and safeguards. These sessions will be organized by CSOs, WBG, and IMF individually or jointly. CSOs will also be able to participate in the Program of Seminars and other high level sessions.

Please find below the schedule of policy sessions. Please check back frequently as we will be publishing additional information and sessions on a near daily basis. For additional sessions which are still being planned visit our online draft schedule. If you would like more information on these sessions, please contact John Garrison (jgarrison@worldbank.org) for WB-related sessions, and Tilla McAntony (tmcantony@imf.org) for IMF-related sessions.

Thanks
World Bank and IMF Civil Society Teams

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursday

Friday

Saturday


Pre-Civil Society Forum Events

Monday, October 7

9:30 am – 4:30 pm
IMF HQ1 Building
Room HQ1-3-500B

Orientation Session on the IMF

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: Sabina Bhatia, Karla Chaman, Tilla McAntony (IMF).

This session will focus on IMF history and structure, as well as policies and programs related to inequality, jobs, and growth.

* Coffee, tea, and cookies will be served


Tuesday, October 8

9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Room: World Bank Main Complex
(MC 2 - 800)

Orientation Session on the World Bank

Sponsor: World Bank Group

Panelists: Jill Wilkins, John Garrison, Aaron Rosenberg, Cara Santos, Hannah George (External and Corporate Relations Department), Soren Gigler (World Bank Institute), and Dina El Neggar (Institutional Integrity Unit/WB).

This session will be divided into two sections.  The first will focus on the IMF and WBG (IBRD, IFC, MIGA) origins, organizational structure, major policies, and operational work. The second section will comprise hands on presentations on the Bank’s new Open Data databases and programs such as Mapping for Results, Open Finance, and Aidflows.

* Coffee, tea, and cookies will be served

 

3:00 - 5:00
I2 - 220

Thinking Small at the World Bank

Sponsors: CAFOD, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)

Panelists: Martin Rama (Director, 2013 World Development Report, WBG), Andrew Stone (Lead Evaluation Officer, Independent Evaluation Group, WBG), Esperanza Lasagabaster (Manager, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, WBG), Sarah Montgomery (Economic Policy Analyst, CAFOD, UK) CHAIR: TBD

The World Development Report on Jobs (2013) highlighted the importance of micro and small enterprises in developing countries. Should small businesses become a bigger focus of the World Bank’s activities? Do they matter for the Bank’s 2030 goals of shared prosperity and ending poverty? What is the Bank already doing or could it do differently? How should we define small businesses? How can we ensure that the ILO’s Decent Work agenda is realized for those working in micro and small enterprises?

This panel session brings together key World Bank staff and other experts to discuss these questions and present their ideas for future “Thinking Small” at the World Bank.

 

5:00 PM - 6:30
MC 12 - 131

CSO Roundtable with World Bank Executive Directors

Sponsor: World Bank Group

Session description forthcoming

CIVIL SOCIETY POLICY FORUM EVENTS 
October 9 - 12

Wednesday, October 9

8:30 - 9:00
I 2 - 220

Welcome Breakfast

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund / World Bank Group

Panelists: Karla Chaman, Tilla McAntony (IMF), John Garrison, Nneka Okereke (WB)

Come meet the Fund and Bank Civil Society Team staff, learn about Spring Meetings policy agenda and activities such as the CS Forum policy sessions, CSO Reception, and other high-level events, as well as discuss meeting logistics.

 

9:00 - 10:30
I 2 - 220

Food Crisis Evaluation Report

Sponsor: WBG (Independent Evaluation Group)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 – 10:30
I 2 - 210

Guideline on IMF-CSOs Relations

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

 

9:00 – 10:30
I 2 - 250

World Bank's Climate Change Policies

Sponsor: World Resources Institute

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 – 10:30
MC 5 - 100

Engaging with Citizens for Greater Development Impact

Sponsors: WBG (WBI, OPCS, SDV, MNA, ECR Departments)

Panelists: Danny Sriskandarajah (Secretary General, CIVICUS), Linda Raftree (Sr. Advisor, Plan International), Robert Hunja (Manager, World Bank Institute), Franck Bousquet (Sector Manager, World Bank), Miguel Angel Rebolledo (Sr. Results Measurement Specialist, IFC), CHAIR: Rachel Jones (Sr. Communications Officer, World Bank Institute)

Citizen engagement can make governments and service providers (including the private sector) more accountable so that policies and project interventions have greater impact for all citizens. The session’s objective is to have a dialogue on best practices and lessons learned in engaging with citizens for greater development impact, including perspectives from Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) and the World Bank Group (WBG). In the context of its renewed focus on ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity, the World Bank Group is looking at ways to scale-up citizen engagement where appropriate, building on lessons of experience.

CSO and WBG panelists will discuss experiences in the use of transparent and effective processes and mechanisms for greater citizen voice and participation in the preparation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of policies, programs and projects as well as efforts to develop sustainable country systems for effective citizen-state engagement.

 

11:00 –12:30
I 2 - 250

Addressing the Challenges of an Unregulated Virtual Economy

Sponsors: International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children; Global Forum on Law, Justice, and Development; WBG (Legal Vice Presidency)

Panelists: Jason Thomas (Thomson Reuters Special Services), Tom Kellermann (Vice President, Cyber Security, Trend Micro, Inc.), CHAIR:  Massimo Cirasino (Head, Payment System Development Group, WBG),

The main objectives of this session are three. First, to build global awareness and understanding of the emergence of a new, unregulated, unbanked virtual economy composed of among other things virtual currencies, anonymous online payment systems, anonymous Internet tools, and bulletproof hosting companies. Second, to help relevant stakeholders, including domestic and global players, to understand the positive aspects associated with these new ecosystems and the risks, including possible abuses to facilitate criminal and illegal activities.  Third, to generate dialogue regarding steps that can be taken in every country and globally.

 

11:00 – 12.30 
I 2 - 220

Dispute Resolution and Prevention at the World Bank: A Collaborative Approach to Problem Solving

Sponsor: WBG (Dispute Resolution and Prevention Team)

Panelists: Amar Inamdar (Program Manager, Dispute Resolution & Prevention, WBG)

Stakeholder disputes and grievances are an expected part of complex and challenging development projects worldwide. Handled poorly or ignored, they can cause project delays, cost overruns, and lead to lasting damage between development agencies, governments, and impacted communities. Managing and resolving stakeholder disputes and grievances early – before they escalate - is a critical risk management tool for the World Bank and an effective technique to strengthen local ownership over development issues and projects.

This session will look at the Bank’s approach to creating opportunities for informal, potentially faster, and more effective problem solving approaches to address complaints from affected people, focusing on three levels: (i) borrower systems; (ii) the World Bank’s internal complaints-handling process; and (iii) independent recourse mechanisms. The session will be led by the Dispute Resolution and Prevention unit in OPCS, which leads the World Bank’s work on grievance redress and project-level mediation.

 

12:30 – 2:00
I 2 - 250

Real Costs of Coal: Lessons from the Tata Mundra Coal Power Plant

Sponsors: Oil Change International, National Alliance of Peoples’ Movement

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 - 2:00
I 2 - 210

Indigenous Peoples’ Lands and Development: World Bank Interventions and Lessons Learned

Sponsor: Indian Law Resource Center

Panelists: Alf Jerve (Member, Inspection Panel, WBG), Isabel Lavadenz-Paccieri  (Former Ombudsperson, Independent Consultation and Investigation Mechanism, Inter-American Development Bank), Liza Grandia (Associate Professor, University of California-Davis, Department of Native American Studies – TBC), CHAIR: Leonardo Crippa (Senior Attorney, Indian Law Resource Center)

The World Bank is increasing its attention to land access, security of land tenure, and land administration as strategies for development. While land is a critical issue for development, when indigenous peoples’ lands are at issue, development outcomes often depend on the extent to which project design and implementation recognize the unique nature of indigenous peoples’ relationship to the land and their collective ownership rights over their lands and resources.

This panel discussion will identify key issues regarding indigenous peoples and land, and explore lessons from past World Bank interventions. Cases examined will include World Bank support of demarcation and titling of indigenous territories in Nicaragua to implement the landmark Awas Tingni decision by the Inter-American Court, land interventions in Honduras and the Democratic Republic of Congo, as well as ongoing support for land surveying and registry through the Guatemala Land Administration projects.

 

12:30 – 2:00
I 2 - 220

Status of World Bank - Civil Society Relations: Advances and Challenges

Sponsor: WBG (Civil Society Team)

Panelists: John Garrison (Head, Civil Society Team, WBG), Chad Dobson (Executive Director, Bank Information Center), Virginia Ifeadiro (National Coordinator, CSO Consultative Group on the World Bank, Nigeria), CHAIR: Izabella Toth (Sr. Corporate Funding Strategist, Cordaid)

The Bank recently published World Bank – Civil Society Engagement: Review of Fiscal Years 2010 – 2012. This is the most comprehensive of the Civil Society Review series since its first edition in 2002. Through its 136 pages of text, photos, and tables, it illustrates how relations with civil society have continued to both expand and deepen across the World Bank Group. The strengthening of these relations was experienced across the spectrum of the “engagement continuum,” which includes information disclosure, policy dialogue, strategy consultations, operational collaboration, and institutional partnerships.

The Review provides detailed information on civil society outreach events, program initiatives, and funding mechanisms implemented by the regions, networks, and numerous other units at the national, regional, and global levels.  Please visit our website for more information and to download the full report and executive summaries in six languages.

This session will promote a discussion on the status of WBG – CSO relations from the perspective of several CSO leaders who engage the Bank through policy dialogue and operational collaboration from the national to the global level.


* Copies of the Review will be available.

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 210

IMF Fiscal Transparency

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 250

Forests at the Intersection of Critical Safeguard Issues and Emerging Priorities at the Bank

Sponsors: Greenpeace and Global Witness

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 3:30
6K-168 (2121 Pennsylvania Ave, IFC Building) 

Update on IFC response to CAO Audit of Financial Intermediaries

Sponsors: International Finance Corporation (IFC)

Panelists: James Scriven (Director for Global Financial Markets, IFC), Bill Bulmer (Director, Environmental, Social, and Governance Department, IFC), CHAIR: Aaron Rosenberg (Chief Public Affairs Office, IFC)

Speakers will give an update on recent developments in response to a CAO audit of IFC's financial intermediary investments, including IFC's FI Action Plan. 

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 220

Update on IDA 17 Replenishment

Sponsor: WBG (Concessional Finance and Partnerships Vice Presidency)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

3:30 – 4:45
I 2 - 250

Update on Global Partnership on Social Accountability

Sponsor: WBG (World Bank Institute)

Panelists: Jeff Hall (Director for Local Advocacy, World Vision International), Rosa Cañete (Director, Oxfam Dominican Republic Program), CHAIR: Roby Senderowitsch (Program Manager, Global Partnership fo r Social Accountability, WBG)

The Global Partnership for Social Accountability (GPSA) is a coalition of donors, governments and civil society organizations (CSOs) that supports civil society and governments to work together to solve governance challenges. To achieve this objective, the GPSA provides strategic and sustained support to CSOs’ social accountability initiatives aimed at strengthening transparency and accountability. It builds on the World Bank’s direct engagement with public sector actors, to create an enabling environment in which citizen feedback is used to solve the critical problems in service delivery and to strengthen public institutions. The GPSA has selected 12 finalists from 10 countries for the first grants. A Knowledge Platform on social accountability is also being prepared.

The panel will bring together representatives from civil society, government and the World Bank to share perspectives on key issues and opportunities in the implementation of the program. Participants will gain an understanding of how this initiative works to foster solutions for key development challenges through social accountability. The discussion will provide an opportunity to generate insights that will shape the next steps for the GPSA as the first round of projects gets underway.

 

3:30 – 4:45
I 2 - 210

Global Youth Dialogue – Inclusive Economic Growth and the Post-2015 Agenda

Sponsor: Global Voices

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

3:30 – 5:00
I 2 - 220

Development Policy Lending and the Safeguards – Closing the Loophole

Sponsors: Global Witness, Derecho, Ambiente, Y Recurso Natural (DAR),
Bank Information Center (BIC)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

5:00 - 6:00
MC 12 - 131

Civil Society Townhall Meeting

Sponsor: WBG, IMF

Panelists: Jim Yong Kim (President, WBG), Christine Lagarde (Managing Director, IMF), CSO Chair (TBD), and two CSO Discussants (TBD)

This townhall is for CSO representatives accredited to the Annual Meetings. The CSO Discussants will make initial remarks on Fund and Bank policies, to be followed by comments from Mr. Kim and Ms.Lagarde. This will be followed by a general discussion on issues of concern to CSO representatives.

 

6:15 - 7:30
East Dining MC C1 - Basement Level

Civil Society Reception

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund, World Bank

The event will be hosted by Cyril Muller (Vice President for External and Corporate Relations , WBG), and Gerry Rice (Director of the Communications Department, IMF)

 


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Thursday, October 10

9:00 - 10:30
I 2 - 210

Post-tsunami Japan Recovery: Philanthropic and Seashore Restoration Response

Sponsors: OISCA / Japan, Global Giving

Panelists: Watanabe Tadashi (Director General, OISCA International), John Hecklinger (Chief Program Officer, GlobalGiving Foundation), CHAIR: Takahiro Nanri (Director, Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA)

Two and a half years have passed since Japan suffered from one of the most severe natural disasters in a millennium. A 9.0 magnitude earthquake and produced a tsunami which hit the eastern region of Tohoku, causing over 15,000 deaths, hundreds of thousands of displaced persons, and a nuclear power plant meltdown.

This session will cover both the broad philanthropic response of Global Giving’s $12 million effort to support local Japanese organizations in the recovery and rebuilding of their communities, and OISCA’s efforts to restore seashore forest at Natori-city, Miyagi-Prefecture. This 10-year effort will entail growing millions of black pine (Pinus thumbergi) seedlings and transplanting them onto the seashore in order to promote integrated environmental, commercial, and economic recovery of the region.

 

9:00 - 10:30
I 2 - 220

A Decade of CORDAID Community Managed Disaster Risk Reduction: Addressing the Challenge of Scaling Up

Sponsor: Cordaid

Panelists: Monique Lagro (Director for DRR & Disaster Response, CORDAID), Munish Kaushik (CMDRR India Program Advisor, Cordaid / Caritas India), Naghma Firdaus (Senior Specialist on CBDM, India National Disaster Management Authority), Christian Dominguez (Director Caritas Zacapa, Guatemala), Mario Abel Diaz Anzueto (Environmental Coordinator, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, Guatemala), Rasmus Heltberg (Lead Evaluation Officer for Global Programs, IEG/WBG) CHAIR: TBC

Among the multitude of crises and related challenges that impact our lives in a multipolar world, one of the most significant are still the ever rising number of natural hazards and disasters. National governments, donor governments, and international institutions try to cope with floods, earthquakes and extreme droughts, which often require disaster and emergency responses. Cordaid believes that we not only need to invest more in enhancing resilience and reducing risks, but take into account the capabilities, needs, and views of local communities. Cordaid promotes community resilience by supporting a managed risk reduction approach ( CMDRR) whereby communities analyze their risks , develop actions to reduce risks, and engage their government and other players in realizing those actions. In order to achieve resilience at a wider scale and achieve greater impact, however, Cordaid believes that risk analysis and reduction needs to be integrated into government planning and program.

This session will promote a discussion on the practical challenges of incorporating a community-based risk reduction approach into government policies in order to promote nationwide disaster resilience. It will be based on lessons learned by Cordaid over the past decade in engaging local government around CMDRR, and linked to reflections on the Bank’s WDR 2014 on Resilience. Panelists will also reflect on country experiences from Indian and Guatemala, where CSOs have worked closely with local and national governments to develop new and more integrated DRR policies.

 

9:00 - 10:30
I 2 - 250

Gender, Growth, and Jobs

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 - 12:30
I 2 - 210

Politics, Power and Risk: Bank Reforms for Fragile and Conflict-affected Situations

Sponsors: International Alert, Oxfam International

Panelists: Joel Hellman (Director, Global Center on Conflict, Security and Development / CCSD, WBG), Marc Cohen (Senior Researcher, Oxfam America), CHAIR: Phil Vernon (Director of Programmes, International Alert)

The World Bank has embarked on a series of ambitious reforms designed to strengthen how it works in countries affected by conflict and fragility (FCS), including Democratic Republic of Congo, Mali, Liberia, Kyrgyzstan and Nepal. Reforms include a greater focus on fragility in Bank country strategies and IDA-funded projects.

What has been learned and what are the on-going challenges for reforms? How should the Bank respond when client government political priorities dominate preferences? For example, if the client government doesn’t want Bank lending to support communities associated with political opponents, or wants to minimize their participation? These and other policy and financing challenges and dilemmas related to Bank engagement in FCS will be discussed by our panelists and participants.

Join us!

 

11:00 - 12:30
I 2 - 250

Toward a Sustainable Energy Future

Sponsor: Bank Information Center (BIC)

Panelists: Sam Tumiwa (North America Representative for the Asian Development Bank / ADB), Josue Tanaka (Managing Director for Energy Efficiency and Climate Change, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development / EBRD), Janine Ferretti (Chief of Environmental Safeguards Unit, Inter-American Development Bank / IDB), Sean Whittaker (Senior Industry Specialist, International Finance Corporation),  CHAIR: Nezir Sinani (Climate Change Coordinator, Bank Information Center)

Global efforts to overcome poverty and advance development can no longer ignore an urgent need of addressing global climate change. For this reason, MDBs have lately adopted policy and project-level energy approaches to support initiatives that promote a sustainable and clean energy future. The Asian Development Bank (ADB), the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), and the International Finance Corporation (IFC) will be presenting and discussing these new approaches. Specifically the session will focus on the various safeguard policies, renewable and efficiency energy options, and the main challenges and concerns to implement them.

 

11:00 - 12:30
I 2 - 220

Gender Justice: An Update on the World Bank’s Gender Work and Views from the Ground

Sponsors: WBG (Gender Team), Bank Information Center

Panelists: Jeni Klugman (Director of Gender and Development, WBG), Odile Faye (AWWORD)

This session will provide an update on the World Bank’s gender work and recent steps undertaken to mainstream gender within the institution. The director of the Gender and Development Team will speak about Bank policy and programs in this area, and two CSO gender specialists will share their own country and regional experiences on gender mainstreaming.

 

11:30 – 1:00
MC 2-131

Economic Management during Political Transition Egypt's Economic plan: The role of the World Bank group and Civil Society

Sponsors: WBG (Office of the Dean of Executive Directors)

Panelists: H.E. Dr. Ziad Bahaa-Eldin (Egyptian Deputy Prime Minister & Minister of International Cooperation), Junaid Kamal Ahmad (Director, Sustainable Development Department for Middle East and North Africa Region, IBRD),  Mouayed Makhlouf  (Director, Middle East & North Africa, IFC),  Mahinour El Badrawi (Egyptian Center for Economic and Social Rights), CHAIR: Hartwig Schafer (Country Director for Djibouti, Egypt, and Yemen, IBRD)

Please RSVP to confirm your participation by Monday, October 7 by sending an email with your name and organizational affiliation to: gassadourian@bicusa.org

* Refreshments will be served

 

12:30 - 2:00
I 2 - 210

Maternal Children Health Evaluation Report

Sponsor: WBG (Independent Evaluation Group)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 - 2:00
I 2 - 250

Environmental and Social Assessment and Management: Strengthening all Levels of the Integrated Framework

Sponsors: Bank Information Center, Others (TBC)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 - 2:00
I 2 - 220

Issues in Education: World Bank Policy Frameworks and Investment Trends

Sponsors: RESULTS Education Fund, Global Campaign for Education

Panelists: Steve Klees (Professor of International Education Policy, University of Maryland), Tony Baker (Education for All Campaign Manager, RESULTS Educational Fund), Judith-Ann Walker (Co-Founder and Executive Director, Development Research and Projects Centre), Meredy Talbot-Zorn (Global Development Policy and Advocacy Manager, Save the Children US), CHAIR: Nancy Van Meter (Deputy Director of Research and Strategic Initiatives, American Federation of Teachers)

This session will focus on key issues related to the World Bank’s Education Strategy, its 2010 pledge to basic education, investment trends, program highlights, and post-2015 considerations.

 

 

12:30 - 2:00
MC 4 - 100

Mobilizing Youth Against Corruption

Sponsors: Global Youth Anti-Corruption Network (GYAC), OCASA Corporation

Panelists: Andrea Benavides Romero (Executive Director, OCASA Corporation, Colombia), Emanuel Callejas Aquino (Advisor, National Network for Integrity, Guatemala), David Riveros Garcia (President, Youth Change Reaction, Paraguay), CHAIR: Jeff Thindwa (Manager, World Bank Institute)

Corruption represents a major threat to the prosperity and development of a country. Considering that today’s youth are the future leaders of the world, it is not only important that they become aware of the negative effects of corruption, but also that they start to engage actively in the prevention of and fight against this development challenge. As part of these efforts, in 2010, the World Bank Institute supported the development of the Global Youth Anti-Corruption (GYAC) network, which is composed by over 1,700 young leaders, journalists, artists, and experts in information and communication technologies (ICT) from civil society all over the world who work to improve transparency and social accountability for better governance.

This session will showcase the work that three youth leaders and members of the GYAC network have done to engage youth in the fight against corruption in their countries –Colombia, Guatemala and Paraguay.

 

2:00 - 3:30
I 2 - 250

Mass Atrocity Prevention as a Development Imperative in Fragile and Conflict Affected Countries

Sponsors: Global Forum on Law, Justice and Development, Trust Fund for Victims, U.S. Department of State, United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

Panelists: Ambassador Tiina Intelmann (President of the Assembly of States Parties / ASP to the Rome Statute), Kristin Kalla (Senior Program Officer, Trust Fund for Victims), Ambassador Stephen Rapp (Office of Global Criminal Justice), Sheelagh Stewart (Director of Governance and Rule of Law, Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery, United Nations Development Programme), CHAIR: Tibi Galis (Executive Director, Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation)

The purpose of this session will be to bring together representatives from civil society (Auschwitz Institute), intergovernmental organizations (ICC/Assembly of States Parties of the Rome Statute, Victims Fund, and the World Bank), bilateral development agencies (USAID) and the U.S. Government (State Department) to present and discuss their respective roles and actions in the prevention of mass atrocities. The session will specifically focus on ways to strengthen the prevention of mass atrocities by adding a development dimension and to continue the knowledge sharing process on this topic, with a special emphasis on Fragile and Conflict affected Situations (FCS).

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 210

Donor Investments in Post-Earthquake Haiti: Gender, Accountability and other Critical Issues for a Just Reconstruction

Sponsor: Gender Action, Action Aid, Unitarian Universalist Service Committee

Panelists: Doudou Pierre Festile (Executive Director, Mouvman Peyizan l’Acul du Nord /MPA) and National Haitian Network for Food Sovereignty and Food Security, RENHASSA - TBC), Rosnel Jean-Baptiste (Executive Secretary, Tet Kole Ti Peyizan Ayisyen – TBC), Claire Lauterbac (Project Manager, Gender Action), CHAIR: Doug Hertzler (Senior Policy Analyst, ActionAid)

Since a devastating earthquake struck Haiti in January 2010, over US$ 13.3 billion has been pledged to the country’s reconstruction. International Financial Institutions (IFIs), including the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank, have committed over US$ 1.7 billion. The US government has committed more than US$ 1.1 billion mostly through the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and State Department. Three years since the earthquake, Haitians and their allies worldwide demand to know how donor funding is being spent.

This panel aims to present critical and gendered perspectives on donor investments and their role in shaping Haiti’s reconstruction and development. Presenters will draw on their recent research and experiences to discuss and critique gender, accountability, and other critical dimensions of donor-funded projects in sectors including agriculture, export-processing, and mining. Panelists will reflect on practical ways to enhance the responsiveness of donors, including the IFIs, to Haitian voices and needs.

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 220

The Economic Impact of IMF-Supported Programs in Low-Income Countries

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 – 5:30
I 2 - 220

Is the World Bank Serious about Engaging CSOs and Communities: The Experience of the HNP CSO Consultative Group

Sponsor: Health Nutrition & Population Civil Society Consultative Group

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

3:30 – 5:00
I 2 - 250

The Role of Intellectual Property (IP) in Developing Countries

Sponsors: Public Interest Intellectual Property Advisers (PIIPA), U.S. Department of State, United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

Panelists: Abanti Bhattacharyya (JD, Senior Intellectual Property Manager, Johns Hopkins University Technology Transfer), Dr. Rob Bertram (Director of the Office of Agricultural Research and Policy, USAID), Caroline Okolo (Executive Director, African Artists Collaborative, Dr. Devinder Mahajan (Professor, Stonybrook University), CHAIR: R. Mark Davis (President and CEO of Public Interest Intellectual Property Advisers / PIIPA )

The purpose of this session will be to explore the ways in which intellectual property can serve as a development tool in the areas of health, agriculture (food security), science, education, culture, biodiversity, the environment, and promote sustainable economic development. This panel discussion will be the first in a series of events held at the World Bank where practitioners and policymakers will explore the pragmatic applications of intellectual property as a development tool.

 

4:00 – 5:30
I 2 - 210

Update on Program for Results (PforR)

Sponsor: WBG (Operational Policies and Country Systems Vice Presidency)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

5:45 – 7:30
MC 10 - 512
(Inspection Panel Office)

Inspection Panel Reception

Sponsor: Inspection Panel

As part of the World Bank/IMF Annual Meetings 2013, the Inspection Panel would be pleased to welcome Forum participants to its traditional Open House. Come and meet the Panel Members and staff of its Secretariat, learn how the Panel works and exchange views with us. Refreshments will be served.

The Inspection Panel is an independent complaints mechanism for people who believe that they have been, or are likely to be, adversely affected by a World Bank-funded project. The Panel provides for accountability through assessment of Bank's compliance with operational policies. The process is designed to provide redress to affected people and address issues of policy non-compliance and harm.

 


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Friday, October 11

9:00 - 10:30
I 2 - 220

New Approaches to Dealing with Sovereign Indebtedness

Sponsors: New Rules for Global Finance, Jubilee USA, Center for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)

Panelists: Richard Gitlin (Senior Fellow, CIGI), Eric LeCompte (Executive Director, Jubilee USA), Tirivangani Mutazu (Policy Officer, AFRODAD), CHAIR: Jo Marie Griesgraber (Executive Director, New Rules for Global Finance)

Since the failure of the Sovereign Debt Restructuring Mechanism (SDRM) in 2003, the international discussion on sovereign crisis workouts and debt restructuring has been at an impasse between proponents of statutory approaches and those favoring decentralized market-based tools. Beyond some refinements to Collective Action Clauses (CACs), little progress has been made over the last 10 years to improve our ability to resolve sovereign debt problems quickly, effectively and efficiently. Given the global economic turmoil of the last few years, it is time to look afresh at incremental ways in which the (non) system can be improved.

This session will consider priorities for improving our approaches to dealing with sovereign debt problems and will review several mutually supportive work programs underway to enhance our capacity to handle sovereign crises through small changes to the status quo.

 

9:00 - 10:30
I 2 - 250

A Cautionary Tale: cost of austerity and inequality in Europe

Sponsors: International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), Oxfam

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 - 10:30
I 2 - 210

Stakeholder Consultations at the World Bank: Principles, Process, Practices

Sponsor: WBG (External and Corporate Relations)

Panelists: Ida Mori (Head, Consultations Team, WBG)

This session will introduce a number of products that the World Bank Group recently issued: A Consultation Hub, which serves as one-stop shop for all Bank stakeholders to see all opportunities for consultation at one glance. This Hub is designed to provide stakeholders with easy access to the opportunities to participate in the Bank’s decision-making process. In this session, we will also introduce a practice note on “Stakeholder Consultations at the World Bank: Principles, Process, Practices,” which introduces principles for stakeholder consultations at the World Bank and provides guidance on how to plan and implement consultations according to best practices. 

 

10:00 - 11:00
U3 -352

MIGA Open House for CSOs

Sponsor: Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA)

This session will provide an opportunity for CSO representatives to meet with MIGA staff to learn more about MIGA and to discuss any issues of concern. Any questions may be directed to Cara Santos Pianesi at csantospianesi@worldbank.org.

11:00 - 12:30
I 2 - 210

The Chad-Cameroon Oil & Pipeline Project: 10th Anniversary of first Oil Exports from Chad. Are there lessons for the World Bank’s planned “smart” risks strategy?

Sponsors: Urgewald, Public Interest Law Center (PILC), Chad

Panelists: Delphine Djiraibe (Director, PILC), Peter Rosenblum (Co-Director, Human Rights Institute, Columbia Law School), Elaine Zuckerman (President, Gender Action), CHAIR: Korinna Horta (Policy director, Urgewald)

World Bank Group financing served as the catalyst for the building of the approximately US$ 7.2 billion Chad-Cameroon Oil & Pipeline Project. This was to be a model extractive industry project to reduce poverty in one of Africa’s poorest regions. Since its inauguration on October 10, 2003, hundreds of millions of barrels of oil have been exported from Chad, yet the country has fallen further on UNDP’s Human Development Index, where it now occupies position Nº 184 out of 186 countries.

This session will present the impacts of the project on people and their environment. It will also discuss the lessons to be drawn from a project where the Bank’s credit risk was well protected but enormous environmental and social risks were placed on the most vulnerable of populations. Such lessons should matter as the World Bank intends to take on more “smart” risk as part of its new corporate strategy.

 

11:00 - 12:30
I 2 - 440

The Role of Child Protection Investments in the Economic and Social Progress of Developing Countries

Sponsor: ChildFund International

Panelists: David Mugawe (Executive Director, AfriChild Centre), Dr. Neil Boothby (Senior Coordinator to the USAID Administrator on Children in Adversity, USAID), Santi Kumaningrum (Co-Director, Centre on Child Protection, University of Indonesia), Prof. Fred Ssewamala (Director, International Centre for Child Health and Asset Development, Columbia University), CHAIR: Timothy Opobo (Child Protection Co-coordinator, ChildFund International),

Social Protection as a means to realize a child’s right to an adequate standard of living has gained political prominence at global, regional and national levels.  There is a growing consensus among development practitioners for the need to shift the focus from a development strategy based on the belief that “a rising tide lifts all boats” to one that focuses on the most vulnerable, such as women, children, and people with disabilities. In particular, there is a need to prioritize investments on child development. The World Bank’s own research demonstrates that investing in children has large potential returns in terms of a community’s future economic well-being, while periods of deprivation have long lasting detrimental consequences.

This session will discuss the linkage between investment in child protection as a component of social protection, and economic and social progress of developing countries. 

 

11:00 - 12:30
I 2 - 250

Smart, Scalable Revenue-neutral Carbon Pricing

Sponsor: Citizens Climate Lobby (CCL)

Panelists: Sieren Ernst, Danny Richter, Joseph Robertson, Elli Sparks (CCL), CHAIR: Erica Flock (CCL)

This panel will discuss the ramifications and the scalability of a revenue-neutral carbon pricing approach called Carbon Fee and Dividend. The four panelists will cover, principally: 1) Carbon Fee and Dividend; 2) Community Building as relating to this carbon pricing strategy; 3) Political Scalability (propagating the policy without need for a global summit); 4) Economics of a Clean-energy Paradigm Shift (political, technological and commercial innovation). All topics will center on the Carbon Fee and Dividend plan. The four presentations will be followed by discussion and Q&A. 

 

11:00 - 12:30
I 2 - 220

Social Assessment and LGBT Inclusion Issues: Advancing from Concept to Policy to Practice

Sponsors: Reconciling Works: Lutherans for Full Participation, St. Paul’s Foundation for International Reconciliation

Panelists: Rachel Kyte (Vice-President for Sustainable Development, WBG), Rev. Canon Albert Ogle (President, St. Paul’s Foundation for International Reconciliation), Rev. McDonald Sembereka (Advisor to the President on Civil Society, Government of Malawi), Khemraj Persaud (Program Coordinator, Society Against Sexual Orientation Discrimination / SASOD), CHAIR: Philip W. Moeller (Director of International Programs, Reconciling Works)

This session builds on two previous panels within the last year on the inclusion of LGBT issues in social assessments carried out for projects financed by the World Bank. The World Bank is beginning to address LGBT inclusivity in some of its operations. With this in mind, this session will focus on: (i) how should the Bank insert the concept of LGBT inclusivity into operational policy, and in its operations; (ii) what issues would relate to communicating and collaborating on this new direction with client governments; (iii) what is the best way for the Bank to work with the CSO community on these issues; and (iv) how would one address local perceptions of cultural sensitivity and inclusivity for the LGBT community in projects financed by the World Bank.

 

12:30 – 2:00
I 2 - 210

World Development Report 2015: The Behavioral and Social Foundations of Development Policy

Sponsor: WBG (WDR Team)

Panelists: Karla Hoff (Director, WDR 2015 Team, WBG), Varun Gauri (Deputy Director, WDR 2015 Team), CHAIR: Merrell Tuck-Primdahl (Sr. Communications Officer, Development Economics Department, WBG).

The World Development Report 2015, to be published in September 2014, will explore what implications recent work in behavioral economics and social psychology have for development policy. This session will focus on the main themes of the report, current issues, and possible implications for development policy, and is part of a wider effort by the WDR15 Team to consult with different stakeholders worldwide over the coming year.

 

12:30 – 2:00
I 2 - 250

IFI Re-engagement in Myanmar: What's Emerging, What's Next?

Sponsors: Burma Partnership, OSI-Burma/SE Asia Initiative

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 – 2:00
I 2 - 220

Launch of Global Financial Governance & Impact Report

Sponsor: New Rules for Global Finance Coalition

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 – 2:00
I 2 - 440

Benchmarking the Business of Agriculture

Sponsor: Practical Action,  WBG (Agriculture and Rural Development Department)

Panelists: Alison Griffith (Senior Policy and Practice Advisor, Practical Action), Grahame Dixie, (Grahame Dixie, Lead Adviser for the BBA Program, WBG), Federica Saliola (Program Manager, WBG), Alan Rennison (Program Officer for Agricultural Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), Hannah Chira (Peace & Livelihoods Program Officer, Agency for Cooperation and Research in Development /ACORD, Kenya) CHAIR: William Galvin (Head of US Operations, Self Help Africa)

The World Bank, with the support of the UK, US and Danish governments and the Gates Foundation, has been developing indicators for a new initiative called 'Benchmarking the Business of Agriculture' (BBA), which is part of a broader Agricultural Transformation Index (ATI).  Many NGOs across the globe have decades of experience of working with small holder farmers in developing countries to improve the viability of their livelihoods. This includes working with governments and donors to shape the policies and practices that will create better enabling environments for those farmers.

This panel session brings together members of the World Bank’s BBA team and members of civil society, to provide a platform for the BBA team to inform a broader set of actors about the project and for civil society to share their perspectives.

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 250

Importance of Including Disability in Development Programs

Sponsors: Lebanese Physical Handicapped Union, International Disability Alliance, National Union of Disabled Persons of Uganda, Bank Information Center (BIC)

Panelists: Mohammed Loutfy (Campaign Coordinator, Lebanese Physical Handicapped Union), Edson Ngirabakunzi (Executive Director, National Union of Disabled Persons of Uganda), Georgia Stone (Human Rights and Social Development Officer, International Disability Alliance), Charles Alton (Independent Consultant),  CHAIR: Rachel Burton (Policy Associate, BIC)

This session will explore the importance of including disability in World Bank operations, particularly in the safeguards, through an analysis of how a World Bank project in Uganda affected persons with disabilities. Based on lessons learned from this and other World Bank projects that have not taken into consideration persons with disabilities needs and rights, the panel will discuss how the World Bank can integrate disability into the safeguards, with a particular emphasis on the Indigenous Peoples Policy, the Involuntary Resettlement Policy, and the Environmental Assessment Policy, as well as the World Bank’s role in the post-MDG agenda related to disability.

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 220

Civil Society Engagement on Country Strategy Development in MENA

Sponsor: Bank Information Center

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 210

Continuing Conversations with CAO

Sponsor: IFC (Compliance and Ombusdman Office / CAO)

Panelists: Meg Taylor (Compliance Advisor and Ombudsman, CAO), Gina Lea Barbieri (Senior Dispute Resolution Specialist, CAO), Daniel Adler (Senior Compliance Specialist, CAO), CHAIR: David Hunter (Professor, Washington College of Law)

The session will present a snapshot of CAO’s work over the last 13 years, and will offer an opportunity for stakeholders to engage CAO in a robust discussion about its body of work, particularly as it relates to recourse, remedy and outcomes. In particular the session will focus on how CAO looks at outcomes, and will speak to outcomes from both Dispute Resolution and Compliance.

 

4:00 – 5:30
I 2 - 210

Growth and Employment

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 – 5:30
I 2 - 220

Safeguarding Forests and Forest Peoples: Lessons from Indonesia, Colombia, China, and India in the context of the World Bank Safeguards Review

Sponsors: Ulu Foundation, NorthEast People’s Alliance (NEPA – India), Lembaga Keadilan Ekologi, Indonesia), ILSA (Colombia), Green Watershed (China), Both ENDS, (Netherlands),  Urgewald (Germany), Friends of the Earth (US)

Panelists: Korinna Horta (Urgewald), Mayra Tenjo Hurtado (ILSA), Ram Wangkheirakpam (NEPA), Yu Chen (Green Watershed), Orchida Rachmadania,  Suwiryo Ismail (Lembaga Keadilan Ekologi , Stephanie Fried (Ulu Foundation), CHAIR: Pieter Jansen (Both ENDS),

In the context of the World Bank Safeguard Review and proposed Bank support for national biodiversity offset plans, panelists will present an overview of concerns related to WBG forest policies and activities.  These include Bank support for industrial-scale logging in tropical forests, the use of biodiversity off-sets to compensate for the degradation and destruction of critical natural habitat, and the intersection of illegal logging, forest destruction and money laundering. Cases will be presented from Indonesia (Climate Investment Fund / Forest Investment Plan activities and Indonesian CSO concerns about WB Forest Policy), Colombia (forest and land tenure rights), China (environmental policy) and India (forest conversion to plantations).

 

4:00 – 5:30
I 2 - 250

World Bank Group Strategy

Sponsor: WBG (Reform Team)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 


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Saturday, October 12

9:00 - 11:00
I 2 - 250

Update on WBG Safeguards Review Process

Sponsor: WBG (Global Consultations Team)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 - 10:30
I 2 - 220

Towards a Global Aid Map

Sponsor: WBG (Open Aid Partnership)

Panelists: Myragliha Giles (General Director for External Financing Management, Government of Bolivia), Jackson Kinyanjui  (Director for External Resource Department, National Treasury of Kenya [TBC]), Edith Jibunoh (Director for Multilateral Institutions, ONE), Andrew Clarke (Advocacy Manager, Publish What You Fund),  CHAIR: Johannes Kiess  (Operations Officer, WBG)

The Open Aid Partnership (OAP) brings together development partners, governments, civil society organizations, foundations, and the private sector to improve aid transparency and effectiveness. The OAP’s goal is to collect and open up local development data to engage citizens and other stakeholders in evidence-based conversations on development. The OAP supports partners to collect, curate and publish development data in an open and accessible format, and visualize it on a common mapping platform. The Partnership builds capacity of citizens, civil society, and the media to understand, use and give feedback on open development data. Thus far, OAP has engaged with Governments of Bolivia, Kenya, Nepal, and Malawi to help them be more transparent, as well as organized data literacy bootcamps for civil society organizations and journalists.

The session will demonstrate the power of open development data with a focus on the geography of aid and how open data can help to better engage with CSOs and citizens.

 

9:00 – 10:30
I 2 - 210

Engaging Local Entrepreneurs on Solving Development Challenges

Sponsor: Egypreneur

Panelists: Magdi Amin (Lead Economist, IFC), Christopher Chroeder (Author of Startup Rising), Ahmed El Sheick (Consultant), Lana Newishy (Founder, YESMENA), CHAIR: Abdelrahman Magdy (CEO, Egypreneur)

Albert Einstein once remarked that "Problems cannot be solved at the same level of awareness that has created them in the first place". Egypt, with a population fast approaching 100 million living on an area half the size of Denmark and importing close to 70% of its food supplies, needs a new level of awareness to address its problems. 60% of Egypt's population is below 30 years of age, have never been empowered to contribute to the economic activities or the political scene despite the huge economic opportunity that they represent.

The session will focus on how the World Bank can empower local entrepreneurs to shape a preferred future for Egypt and create a win-win-win situation for the MENA region, US, Europe, and the global economy. Panelists will specifically discuss the concepts of proactive entrepreneurship, human ecology, and long cycles of capital accumulation in order to bring a new perspective to the current situation in Egypt and the MENA region.

 

11:00-12:30
I 2 - 220

Towards Universal Health Coverage in Fragile and Transition States

Sponsors: Cordaid, Ministry of Health/ Burundi, Health Development and Performance (HDP/Rwanda)

Panelists: Remco van der Veen (Director for Healthcare, Cordaid), Dr. Nyasha Masuka (Provincial Medical Director, Ministry of Health, Zimbabwe), Habineza Christian (Director, HDP), Dr.Dionis Nizigiyimana (Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Public Health and the Fight Against AIDS), Akiko Maeda (Lead Health Specialist on HNP, Human Development Network, WBG), CHAIR: Dr. Godelieve van Heteren (Director, Rotterdam Global Health Initiative at Erasmus University, Rotterdam)

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will replace the MDGs after 2015. Already, WHO and World Bank have jointly given their support to one SDG for health, namely Universal Health Coverage (UHC). At the same time, the “New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States” (Busan Declaration of December 2011) serves as an equally important global policy framework on how to promote health coverage in fragile states. Cordaid has a strong track record on healthcare interventions in fragile and transition states and is well-known for its ability to design and implement results-based financing for health (RBF) programs, scale up such programs, and provide technical assistance related to RBF.

It is our intention to feed this experience into the global discussion on universal health coverage, while at the same time gain insight on the specific challenges to promote universal health coverage in fragile states. With this in mind, Cordaid has produced a position paper on this issue based on an extensive literature review, mixed methods interviews with key stakeholders in four countries (Zimbabwe, DRC Congo, Burundi, and Afghanistan), and background research.

The session will include a presentation of this paper and promote a discussion among government officials, CSO representatives, Bank staff, and participants around the challenges of promoting universal health coverage in fragile states.

 

11:00–12:30
I 2 - 210

Adaptive Change is the Question; Entrepreneurial Civil Society is the Answer

Sponsors: Operation HOPE, Parksonian Institute

Panelists: Jena Roscoe (1st SVP, Chief of Government Affairs, Operation HOPE, Inc.), Faisal Hoque (Founder/CEO, BTM Corporation), Michele Golden (CEO, Empowered World Ventures), Pya Cope (Partner KAM Financial), Ambassador Robin Sanders  (Founder, FEEEDS Advocacy Initiative), Ditu Kasuyi (Advisory Board President, Urban Financial Services Coalition), Zaneilia Harris (President, Harris & Harris Wealth Management Group), Marilyn Hoosen (Financial Advisor, Morgan Stanley), CHAIR: James Parks (Founder/CEO, Parksonian Institute),

Adaptive work happens when we lead change where both the problem and the solution are unclear and all the participants require new learning. A social entrepreneurial mindset for Civil Society can change the odds. Government agencies are slow to respond. Due to globalization and technology, empowered individuals have more influence than ever. Entrepreneurial Civil Society represents the quantum approach, where relationships & creativity are the critical success factors. The global entrepreneurial mindset unleashes new perspectives on new challenges and opportunities. Rapid changes in demographics, economics, and technology are affecting this sector in profound ways.

In this high-energy session, we have two sets of panelists: (1) successful global entrepreneurs who will help to frame the questions; (2) successful CSO practitioners who will help to frame the answers. Our panelists have unique perspectives on how CSOs can be more effective and efficient.

 

11:00- 12:30
I 2 - 250

Wages, Taxes, and Subsidies in Arab Countries: A Debate Between Peoples’ Social and Economic Aspirations and IMF Advice

Sponsors: Arab NGO Network for Development,Third World Network

Panelists: Khaled Ali (Egyptian Center for Economic and Social Rights), Mohamed Said Saadi (Professor, Morocco), CHAIR: Kinda Mohamadieh (Arab NGO Network for Development )

In light of citizens mobilizations and revolutions in multiple Arab countries, the governments of Morocco, Yemen, Jordan, and Tunisia have set up new loan agreements with the IMF. The negotiations for a loan agreement with Egypt have been one of the most publicly contested economic issues in the country since the people’s revolution in 2011.

Moreover, the IMF has been serving as a main policy advisor to the ‘Deauville Partnership’ that was launched by the G8 countries in May 2011, and presented as a long-term initiative in support of countries witnessing transition in the Arab region. Contradictory policy advice focusing on short-term and narrow macroeconomic stabilization goals, attached to financing and assessment reports from the IMF, represent significant structural impediments to longer term development economic objectives which these countries need at this stage of their political transition.

Among the major areas where a significant gap exists between IMF policy advise and broad citizen’s views in these countries are: wage policies and labor market, tax policies, and subsidy reforms related to the debate between universal and targeted social protection programs. The panelist will address the overall role of the IMF in the Arab region and in particular the three policy issues highlighted above.

 

12:30 – 2:00
I 2 - 220

Scaling up Support to Community Forestry as an Approach to REDD + Project Management: Lessons from Asia

Sponsors: HuMA Foundation / Indonesia, RECOFTC

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 – 2:00
I 2 - 250

Why the Bank and Fund Provide Too Little Debt Relief Too Late - and What can be Done About it.

Sponsors: Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, EURODAD, Erlassjahr

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 250

Meeting President Kim’s Pledge of “No Dilution” for Safeguards? Ensuring Upward Harmonization and Preventing a “Race to the Bottom”

Sponsors: Ulu Foundation (US), Urgewald (Germany), Green Watershed (China), Lembaga Keadilan Ekosistem (Indonesia), Friends of the Earth (US), NEPA (India)

Panelists: Yu Chen (Both ENDS -Green Watershed), Korinna Horta (Urgewald), Ram Wangkheirakpam (NEPA), Orchida Ramadhania, Rio Ismail (Lembaga Keadilan Ekosistem), Stephanie Fried (Ulu Foundation), CHAIR: Pieter Jansen (Both Ends)

During the Bank’s last Annual Meeting in Tokyo, President Kim publicly committed to ensuring that the Safeguard Review process would not lead to any weakening or “dilution” of protections for the environment or project-affected people. To ensure “no dilution” and to avoid a “race to the bottom,” however, the Bank must address concerns regarding scope, architecture, and implementation of policies as well as their content.

This panel will focus on methods for ensuring that the President’s mandate of ensuring “no dilution” can best be met, exploring ways to ensure “upward harmonization” of Bank safeguards with the highest existing standards, avoiding the “China excuse,” recommendations for the scope of the safeguards review and an examination of the relevance of IFC Performance Standards as a model for World Bank Safeguards.

 

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 210

The Voice of Young Business Leaders on the World Economy: Achievements and Prospects of the G-20Y Summits

Sponsors: G-20Y Summit IOC, International Youth Diplomacy League

Panelists: Jean-Luc Larribau (Business Assembly President, G-20Y Summit IOC), Holger Erchinger (Advisory Board Member, G-20Y Summit IOC), CHAIR: Ksenia Khoruzhnikova (Founder and President, G-20Y Summit International Organizing Committee)

After a brief presentation of the G-20Y Summit concept and of a few key-recommendations made in the 2013 G-20Y Summit Communiqué (see www.g20ys.org for more detailed information), this session will focus on discussing the achievements and prospects of the G-20Y Summit as a policy dialogue platform for young business leaders on the prosperity of the world economy. Panelists will include representatives from the G-20Y Summit, IMF, and WBG. Topics to be discussed include the G20/G-20Y agenda for 2014, and ways international institutions and governments can interact more closely with business platforms such as the G-20YSummit.

The common thread of these discussions will be the threefold G-20Y vision: (i) putting mid- and long-term global economic prosperity on today's international agenda, (ii) achieving greater international cooperation and (iii) sharing innovative ideas.

 

2:00 – 3:30
I 2 - 220

Assessing IMF Advice on Subsidy Policy in the Middle East

Sponsors: New American Foundation, Arab NGO Network for Development

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 – 5:30
I 2 - 220

The World Bank’s Coal to Clean Energy Transition

Sponsor: Sierra Club

Panelists: Dan Schnitzer (Founder and Executive Director, Earthspark International), Bruce Buckheit (Former EPA Enforcement Officer), Visar Azemi (Coordinator, Kosovo Civil Society Consortium for Sustainable Development / KOSID), CHAIR: Athena Ballesteros (Financial Flows and Environment Project Manager, World Resources Institute / WRI)

The World Bank’s recently adopted Energy Strategy is a welcomed step forward in the transition away from funding dirty fossil fuel projects, beginning with coal. This provides an opportunity to align the World Bank’s portfolio with emerging opportunities in clean energy including the often neglected off grid clean energy sector. However, while the strategy promises a new direction, old coal projects linger including the proposed 600 MW Kosovo C coal-fired power plant.

The Sierra Club has commissioned Bruce Buckheit, former chief US EPA Enforcement Officer, to provide a new analysis of the project based on the Terms of Reference (TOR) for a new Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA). In addition, to Bruce’s analysis KOSID will present its view of the latest developments in Kosovo and civil society demands regarding the project in light of the World Bank and US Government’s recently announced coal restrictions.

In addition, panelists will discuss how to complete the coal to clean energy transition at World Bank. Dan Schnitzer from Earth Spark International will discuss the neglected opportunities in financing clean energy access including the continued call for $500 million in risk adjusted finance for the off-grid sector.

 

4:00 – 5:30
I 2 - 210

Is the European Recovery Finally Under Way? The Importance of Macroeconomic Policy for Europe and the World Economy

Sponsor: Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 – 5:30
I 2 - 250

Pathways to Addressing Africa’s Potentially Explosive Unemployment Challenge 

Sponsors: African Business Roundtable (ABR), NEPAD Business Group, African Governance Institute

Panelists: James Mwangi (CEO, Equity Bank), Sanusi Lamido Sanusi (Governor, Central Bank of Nigeria), Abdoulie Janneh (African Governance Institute), Ngozi Okonjo Iweala (Minister of Finance, Nigeria), Strive Masiyiwa (ECONET Wireless), CHAIR: Edith Jibunoh (Director for Multilateral Institutions, ONE)

Africa’s unemployment challenge is troubling. This persistent problem has the potential to derail the current advances made on economic growth and development and generate further political instability. Addressing Africa’s unemployment challenge is not only key to meeting the Millennium Development Goals by 2015, but even more critical in the post 2015 agenda. Expanding traditional sectors and opening up non-traditional but potentially productive sectors is without doubt one of the pathways to generating employment on the continent.

Within this context, this session will focus on the present state of the Africa’s economy with a particular emphasis on the structural unemployment problem which continues unabated despite the economic growth being experienced in many countries. Panelists will discuss modalities for a systemic approach to employment creation in Nigeria and in other countries, analyze their impact, and compare with lessons learned from other regions around the world.

 

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Last updated: 2013-10-01




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