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2014 Spring Meetings - Civil Society Program

 

Civil Society Program
Washington, DC
April 7 - 12, 2014

The Civil Society Program will be held from Monday, April 7 to Saturday, April 12, prior to, and during the 2014 Spring Meetings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank Group (WBGG). It is being organized by the Bank and Fund Civil Society Teams. The Forum will bring together IMF and WBGG staff, CSO representatives, government officials, academics, and others to exchange views and dialogue on a wide range of topics. 

The CS Forum will comprise CSO Orientation sessions on the IMF and WBGG, CSO Roundtable with Executive Directors, CSO Reception, and a Civil Society Policy Forum with an expected 55 policy dialogue sessions on such issues as climate change, fiscal policies, post-MDGs agenda, and safeguards. These sessions will be organized by the CSOs, WBGG, and IMF individually or jointly. CSOs will also be able to participate in many other policy sessions during the Spring Meetings.

Please find the schedule of sessions below.  Please check back frequently as we will be publishing additional information and sessions in the coming days.  For additional sessions which are still being planned visit our online draft schedule.   If you would like more information on these sessions, please contact John Garrison (jgarrison@worldbank.org) for WBG-related sessions, and Tilla McAntony (tmcantony@imf.org) for IMF-related sessions.

 

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursday

Friday

Saturday


Pre-Civil Society Forum Events

Monday, April 7

9:30 am – 4:30 pm
IMF HQ 2 Building
Room 01A - 250A&B
1900 Pennsylvania Ave, NW

Orientation Session on the IMF

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: Sabina Bhatia, Rhoda Weeks-Brown, Karla Chaman, Tilla McAntony (External Relations Department).

This session will focus on IMF policies and programs.

* Coffee, tea, and cookies will be served

Tuesday, April 8

9:30 am – 1:00 pm
Room: I 2 - 220

Orientation Session on the World Bank Group

Sponsor: World Bank Group

Panelists: Jill Wilkins (External and Corporate Relations Department, WBG), Edith Jibunoh, John Garrison (Civil Society Team, WBG), Aaron Rosenberg (IFC).

This session will focus on WBG (IBRD, IFC, MIGA) origins, organizational structure, major policies, operational work, and open data databases. 

*  Coffee, tea, and cookies will be served

 

5:00 PM - 6:30
MC 13 - 121

CSO Roundtable with World Bank Group Executive Directors

Sponsor: World Bank Group

Panelists: 

This will be a roundtable discussion between WBG Executive Directors and civil society representatives attending the Spring Meetings. The purpose of this event is to promote an exchange of views and discussion on key policy issues such as the Bank’s new development strategy, citizen’s voices, safeguards review, and climate change.

 

CIVIL SOCIETY POLICY FORUM EVENTS 
April 9 - 12

Wednesday, April 9

8:30 - 9:00
I 2 - 220
(1850 I St, N.W)

Welcome Breakfast

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund, World Bank Group

Panelists: Edith Jibunoh, John Garrison, Nneka Okereke (WBG), Tilla McAntony, Anneta Orraca-Tetteh (IMF)

Come meet the Fund and Bank Civil Society Team staff, learn about Spring Meetings activities such as the CS Forum policy sessions, and discuss meeting logistics.

  

9:00 – 10:30
Room: I 2 - 250 

Mega-Projects: Trends in New and Existing Institutions and their Normative Approaches

Sponsors: Heinrich Boell Foundation, Bretton Woods Project, Latindadd, Pacific Environment, International Rivers, European Network on Debt and Development (EURODAD), Center of Concern, URGEWALD

Panelists: TBC

Existing international institutions are being re-oriented and new international institutions created - primarily for the purpose of mobilizing finance for large infrastructure projects, particularly for industry and trade facilitation (energy, ports, roads, rails, water).  For instance, we are seeing movement toward formation of the BRICS Bank, the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, and a World Bank Global Infrastructure Finance Facility (GIFF), as well as an expansion of infrastructure operations by the Latin America Development Bank (CAF) and the Program for Infrastructure Development in Africa, among others. 

The G20 is helping to mobilize institutional finance, reform the investment climate, ensure that obstacles to building "pipelines" of bigger (cross-border) "bankable" projects, especially public private partnerships, are removed.  Meanwhile, with great consequences for the energy sector and global warming, we see some Development Finance Institutions, Export-Credit Agencies and governments moving away from coal and toward renewables and others doing the opposite.  Come listen and discuss these important trends and identify ways to democratize the decision-making process to help ensure sustainable development.

 

9:00 – 10:30
Room: I 2 - 210 

IMF Debt Limit Policies

Sponsor: International Monetary Fund (IMF)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

  

9:00 – 10:30
Room: I 2 - 220

Ensuring the Bank’s Investment in and Prioritization of Reproductive Health up to 2015 and Beyond

Sponsors: International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), White Ribbon Alliance, WBG (Health, Nutrition and Population Division)

Panelists: Alison Marshall (Senior Adviser for Advocacy, IPPF), WBG Manager (TBC)

The session will focus on the recent IPPF’s publication “The Scorecard Revisited: Monitoring and Evaluating the Implementation of the World Bank’s Reproductive Health Action Plan 2010–2015” which is IPPF’s second interim assessment on the implementation of World Bank’s Reproductive Health Action Plan which was launched in 2010. The Bank’s Action Plan is ambitious in its aims to reduce high fertility, improve pregnancy outcomes, and reduce sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, across 57 ‘high burden’ countries.

The session will provide a shared platform for the Bank and IPPF to showcase the achievements of the Bank’s Action Plan, to discuss the Scorecard’s findings, and furthermore to reinvigorate energy around accelerating progress on MDG 5, where least has been made.

 

10:00 – 11:30
Room: L-109
IFC Building
(2121 Penn. Ave.)

Discussion with CAO: Update on Recent Compliance Cases

Sponsor: Compliance Advisor and Ombudsman (WBG)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: I 2 - 250 

What are the Trends in the Energy Sector?  For Instance, What is the Future for Fossil Fuels (King Coal) and Big Dams Versus Appropriate-Scale Renewables?

Sponsors: Bretton Woods Project, Mott Foundation, Heinrich Boell Foundation-North America, Latindadd, Pacific Environment, International Rivers, Eurodad, Center of Concern, and Third World Network.

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: I 2 - 220 

New Research on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) Inclusion and Development

Sponsors: American Jewish World Service, WBG (GLOBE), Bank Information Center

Panelists: Amy Lind  (Mary Ellen Heintz Professor,  Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, University of Cincinnati), Mathilda Piehl (Chefredaktör RFSL Media), CHAIR: Lee Badgett  (Director, Center for Public Policy & Administration, University of Massachusetts, Amherst)

A panel of researches will discuss the findings of a research study on the economic costs of LGBT exclusion and how to measure those costs. Additionally the panel will discuss the benefits of inclusion and how it can be measured. The Panel will consist of economists, LGBT and development experts, and other leaders in this field of research.

The goal is to outline the importance of LGBT inclusion in development projects. This session will be one of the first opportunities to examine the findings of this ground-breaking research at the World Bank, and thus will afford a unique opportunity for researches, bank staff, and civil society representatives to share their perspectives and ideas on how to move this agenda forward.

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: I 2 - 210

Reshaping IMF Work Agenda/Triennial Surveillance Review

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:00 – 1:30
Room: L-109
IFC Building
(2121 Penn. Ave.)

Update on IFC Response to CAO Audit on Financial Intermediaries

Sponsor: WBG (International Finance Corporation)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 – 2:00
Room: I 2 - 220

How Development Agencies Might Contribute to Prevent Mass Atrocities

Sponsors: Budapest Centre for the International Prevention of Genocide and Mass Atrocities, WBG (Legal Vice Presidency)

Panelists:  Bernard Harborne  (Lead Social Development Specialist, WBG), CHAIR: Enzo Maria Le Fevre Cervini (Director of Research and Cooperation, Budapest Centre)

Bilateral and multilateral development agencies and donors play a key role in efficiently responding to crisis situations. Their activities should also be increasingly taken into account in crisis situations with potential for escalation and mass atrocities. Bilateral and multilateral development agencies have a key role to play in crisis situations because of both their relatively easy access to information in hard-to-access areas, and their ability to communicate with the conflicting parties and other players/stakeholders of the international community.

Furthermore, their work on the ground enables them to effectively contribute to identifying community-level risk factors of mass violence. Most notably, they are able to find evidence on a variety of local issues which are not visible from far away capital cities.

This session, will therefore foster a discussion among bilateral and multilateral development agencies on their possible role and ways of cooperation with other stakeholders in mass atrocities prevention.

 

12:30 – 2:00
Room: I 2 - 210

Is the Donor Community Doing Things Differently?: Updates from World Bank and ADB Strategy Implementation in Myanmar

Sponsors: IFI Watch Myanmar, US Campaign for Burma, Bank Information Center

Panelists: TBC

Since their official re-engagement in 2012, the World Bank, Asian Development Bank and other donor agencies have stepped up their diagnostic and project lending activities. As they are expanding their analytical and investment services, they are also developing their medium-term strategies geared to broadening geographic reach and sectoral scope. This session will focus on several questions:

  • How do agriculture and regional economic cooperation and integration play our in their strategies?
  • How are these donor agencies approaching the resource conflict and the environmental and social risks that will be associated with their investments? 
  • Will their safeguards and accountability mechanisms be adequate to address the risks and maximize the development benefits?

 

12:30 – 2:00
Room: I 2 - 250

Discussion of "Foreclosing the Future" with Bruce Rich

Sponsor: WBG (Civil Society Team)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 


2:00 - 3:30
Room: L-109 
IFC Building
(2121 Penn. Ave.)

Update on Dinant and Discussion of Risk Management at IFC

Sponsor: WBG (International Finance Corporation)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:00 – 3:30
Room: I 2 - 250

Looking Ahead to the June 2014 GPE Pledging Conference: The World Bank and the Global Partnership for Education

Sponsors: Global Campaign for Education, Global Campaign for Education – US, RESULTS Educational Fund, Women Thrive Worldwide, Plan International, Save the Children, Oxfam International

Panelists: Elizabeth King (Director of Education and Acting Vice President in the Human Development Network, World Bank – TBC), Caroline Pearce (Global Coordinator, Global Campaign for Education), Dr. Lea Salmon-Marchat (Lead Education Specialist, Laboratory for Research on Economic and Social Transformations (LARTES) of the University Cheikh Anta Diop of Dakar),  CHAIR: Ed Gragert (Director, Global Campaign for Education – US)                                   

With the Global Partnership for Education (GPE) – a key partner of the World Bank – kicking off its 2015-2018 replenishment campaign with a pledging conference to be held in Brussels in June, this session looks at the surrounding landscape of issues and implications for support to basic education, including:

  • Evolving relations between the World Bank and GPE.
  • World Bank and GPE support to basic education and the overall education aid landscape.
  • GPE’s support to civil society through the Civil Society Education Fund.
  •  GPE’s country-level impact, and national education advocates’ activity around GPE replenishment.
  • Implications of the GPE Pledging Conference on education in a post-2015 world.

 

2:15 – 3:45
Room: I 2 - 220

Inequality and Fiscal Policy Debate

Sponsors: IMF, WBG, Oxfam

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: I 2 - 250

What Role Can the Poor Play in Ending Extreme Poverty?

Sponsors: ATD Quart Monde,  WBG (Chief Financial Office), French Embassy

Panelists: Opening Remarks: Bertrand Badré (Chief Financial Officer, WBG), Carlos Revilla (Director, UNITAS / Bolivia), Peter Bakvis  (Washington Representatives, International Trade Union Confederation / ITUC), Marcelo Giugale (Sector Director, WBG),  CHAIR:  Ben Fehsenfeld (National Director, ATD Fourth World, USA)

In 2000, a study by the World Bank, conducted in fifty developing countries, stated that “there are 2.8 billion poverty experts: the poor themselves. Yet the development discourse about poverty has been dominated by the perspectives and expertise of those who are not poor … The bottom poor, in all their diversity, are excluded, impotent, ignored and neglected; the bottom poor are a blind spot in development.” 

In April 2013, President Jim Yong Kim stated that the Bank’s “first goal is to end extreme poverty by 2030 … which will require extraordinary effort …The job will become tougher and tougher, because those remaining in poverty will be the hardest to reach… If we are to succeed, we have to change the way we work together”. 

The process for assessing the MDGs, coordinated by the United Nations, was a unique opportunity to change the way we work together. This is why ATD Fourth World has launched its own participatory research project to assess the MDGs in twelve countries in which it has been active for years, and to ensure that people living in extreme poverty can contribute their experiences and their knowledge to the development agenda.

This session will be devoted to discussing the specific methodology that was implemented to think together with people living in extreme poverty, and its outcomes, paving the way for further collaboration in this field.

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: I 2 - 210

Update on Program for Results Program

Sponsor: WBG (PforR Team)

Speaker: Fadia Saadah (Manager, Operational Policies and Country Services)

The event is intended to provide CSO Forum attendees with an update on the ongoing review of the first two years of implementation of the Program-for Results (PforR). The PforR Team will provide information on the status of the review, discuss early emerging lessons, and present next steps.

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: I 2 - 220

Utilizing the African Diaspora and Multinationals as a Force Multiplier to Create Jobs for African Youth

Sponsor: WBG (Africa Region)

Panelists: Mattias Lundberg (Senior Economist, Social Protection Unit), Kaushal Jhalla (Consultant, World Bank Institute), Toyin Adeniji (Principal Operations Officer, Sustainable Business Advisory - Global), CHAIR: Nii Simmonds (Consultant, Africa Region, WBG)

The World Bank Group recently announced its renewed target to end extreme poverty by 2030 and boost shared prosperity of the bottom 40 percent of the population in all developing countries. How do we get there with our present development model? The World Bank Africa Region is keenly aware that youth unemployment continues to be an issue, with half of the population under 25 years of age. How can the WBG leverage the African diaspora to provide mentorship and technical assistance for youth to start businesses, support a culture of entrepreneurship, and help to alleviate unemployment in Africa?

In addition, various multinationals cannot find trained workers who have the right skills to work in their various business initiatives in Africa, how can the African diaspora be engaged as a force multiplier to partner with this effect? This session will discuss ways in which the WBG can partner with the diaspora community and multinationals to create jobs for youth as well as provide opportunities to partner, provide mentorship, and technical assistance for African youth.

 

6:00  - 7:30
East Dining Room
(Main Complex Building
Basement Level MC 1)

Civil Society Reception

Sponsors: International Monetary Fund, World Bank Group

The event will be hosted by Cyril Muller (Vice President for External and Corporate Relations, World Bank Group) and Gerry Rice (Acting Director of the External Relations Department, IMF)
  


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Thursday, April 10

9:00 - 10:30
Room: I 2 - 210

Human Rights Impact Assessments

Sponsor: Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: I 2 - 220

Consultation on International Tax Spillovers

Sponsors: Action Aid, Tax Justice Network Africa, Christian Aid, LATINDAD, New Rules for Global Finance Coalition, Centre on Tax and Development, IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: I 2 - 250

Can Extreme Poverty be Eradicated Without Aggressively Attacking the World’s Top Problem?

Sponsor: Partnership for Transparency Funding (PTF)

Panelists: Homi Kharas (Executive Secretary, UN High Level Panel of Eminent Persons and Brookings Institution), Vinay Bhargava (Chief Technical Officer, Partnership for Transparency Fund),  CHAIR: Daniel Ritchie (President Emeritus, Partnership for Transparency Fund)

In related recent events, the World Bank has pledged to help eradicate extreme poverty by 2030 and the UN High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons, advising on the post-2015 development agenda, has stressed the importance of leaving no one behind.  A recent WIN/Gallup International Poll of 66,806 people in 69 countries identified the world’s top problem as Corruption.  How are these related? Extreme poverty cannot be ended without fighting for corruption-free public services and protection for the most vulnerable. Numerous studies have shown the limited success of government-led anti-corruption efforts. Can citizen-led action provide a solution? Can they complement state-led efforts? Are donors, including the World Bank, still committed to support citizen action? 

The session will focus on these questions, drawing on the grass roots experience of the Partnership for Transparency Fund in helping more than 250,000 poor households fight corruption in 50 countries.   CSOs are welcome to share their experiences. Please Email slittle@ptfund.org to participate.

 

11:00 - 12:30
Room: I 2 - 250 

Human Rights and the Safeguards Review

Sponsors: Urgewald, German Federal Ministry for International Cooperation (BMZ)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 - 12:30
Room: I 2 - 210 

IMF Fiscal Policies

Sponsor: IMF

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 - 12:30
Room: I 2 - 220

World Crime Forum: The Impact & Cost of Corruption on Development and Global Business

Sponsors: International Society for Criminology, International Association of Penal Law, International Society for Social Defense, Bellagio Forum for Security and Development.

Panelists: Patrick Radden Keefe (Senior Fellow, The Century Foundation), Alexandra Wrage (President, TRACE), Karen A. Popp (Partner & Global Co-chair of White Collar Group, Sidley Austin), Frank Vogl (Co-Founder, Transparency International), CHAIR: Emilio C. Viano (President, Scientific Commission, International Society for Criminology)

Corruption is recognized as one of the world's greatest challenges. It is a major obstacle to sustainable development, with a larger impact on poor communities.  It corrodes the very fabric of society and seriously damages the private sector. It impedes economic growth, distorts competition, and entails serious legal and reputational risks. Corruption is very costly. The World Bank estimates that it adds 10% or more to the costs of doing business worldwide and that "bribery has become a $1 trillion industry."

While game-changing ideas and large-scale initiatives are not easy to implement, a “coalition of the willing” has been forming, with business, civil society and government leaders showing more willingness to support anti-corruption initiatives. This momentum represents an important opportunity to design corruption out of the system.  This session discusses the formulation of a global agenda mobilizing business, government, and civil society against corruption in a coordinated and effective way.

 

12:30 - 2:00
Room: I 2 - 220

Update from the Inspection Panel

Sponsor: WBG (Inspection Panel)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 - 2:00
Room: I 2 - 250 

Advancing Universal Access to Sustainable Modern Energy

Sponsors: Sierra Club, Oil Change International

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 - 2:00
Room: I 2 - 210

Global Youth Highlights: An Introduction to the Ambitions and Ideas of Global Youth Leaders in Development

Sponsor: Global Voices

Panelists: TBC

This session will be an opportunity for youth leaders attending the World Bank and IMF Spring Meetings from across the world to present their perspectives, ambitions, and ideas on topics of relevance to the Civil Society Forum. Each short presentation will allow future world leaders to highlight lessons from their respective civil society organizations, businesses, or universities.  Come along on Wednesday lunchtime to hear the voices of global youth leaders and hear a younger take on the issues that are of concern to us all!

 

2:15 - 3:45
Room: I 2 - 250

Update on Global Partnership on Social Accountability

Sponsor: WBG (GPSA Team)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:15 - 3:45
Room: I 2 - 220 

Gender & Development: What’s Happening Now 

Sponsors: Bank Information Center (BIC), WBG (Gender Team)

Panelists: Jeni Klugman (Director of Gender Unit, WBG), Nehad Aboul Komsan (Chairperson, Egyptian Center for Women’s Rights), Maria Eitel (President and CEO, Nike Foundation)

Gender has been identified, again, as a special theme in IDA 17.  The panel will provide an update on recent trends in gender development internationally, and discuss several exciting initiatives and research being carried out on the topic worldwide.

 

2:15 - 3:45
Room: I 2 - 210

Reducing Corruption Through Interaction with Parliamentarians

Sponsor: Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption (GOPAC)

Panelists: Dr. Donya Aziz (Former Parliamentarian, GOPAC), CHAIRAkaash Maharaj (Executive Director, GOPAC)

This session will focus on the various roles that parliamentarians play in reducing corruption in their countries. A GOPAC member, and former parliamentarian, will argue that parliamentarians can interact with the donor community to improve project implementation. A PNOWB member, and current parliamentarian, will discuss how interaction with WB country offices and IMF missions has positively influenced donor funded programing. Representatives from other organizations that work closely with Parliamentarians have also been invited to share their experience on the benefits of transparent legislatures, best practices and tools for parliamentarian, donor and CSO interaction.

  

4:00 - 5:30
Room: I 2 - 210

Can Development Really be Delivered by Investing in Private Banks?

Sponsors: Bretton Woods Project, European Network on Debt and Development (EURODAD)

Panelists: Peter Chowla (Coordinator, Bretton Woods Project), Annie Bird (Co-Director, Rights Action) - TBC

More than 20% of the World Bank’s lending ($10 billion a year) now goes to banks and other financial institutions, yet the Bank’s own compliance body has found that the Bank Group does not have adequate information about the use of the resources. This session will discuss the findings of several new reports and cases in Cambodia, Guatemala and Honduras which shed light on the scale and problems with this sector.

 

4:00 - 5:30
Room: I 2 - 220

Financing Africa's Agriculture

Sponsors: African Business Roundtable, ONE

Panelists: Alex Otti (Managing Director / Chief Executive Officer, Diamond Bank), Evelyn Oputu (Managing Director, Bank of Industry), Taz Avaripour (Manager, Infrastructure & PPA,  African Development Bank), CHAIR: Sipho Moyo (Chief Operating Officer, ONE)

Agriculture continues to be a major growth driver in many countries of the world. This is particular true in the case of developing countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America where food production provides the bulk of personal and national income as well as employment for a sizeable percentage of the population. With the world economy now on a fragile recovery from the global financial and economic crisis, the call for additional 'growth poles' for the world has never been louder and Africa has been recognized to play that important role.

With growth rates far beyond the global average in the last ten years and a projected GDP growth of 5% in 2014, Africa is expected to be a growth driver for the global economy. For that to happen, there is the need to bring Africa's agriculture on a more meaningful and sustainable path with a view to unleashing the potential of that sector, which in turn will require increasing financing for agriculture projects and programs.

 

4:00 - 5:30
Room: I 2 - 250

Mainstreaming Citizens Engagement in World Bank Operations

Sponsor: WBG (Citizens Engagement Team)

Panelists: TBC

Building on commitments in its new strategy and goals, the World Bank Group is developing a common approach to mainstreaming citizen engagement in Bank Group-supported activities with the goal of improving their results. In this context, the Strategy to Mainstream Citizen Engagement in World Bank Group Operations will also examine how Bank Group interventions can contribute to building effective national mechanisms for citizen engagement with governments and the private sector.

This dialogue session aims to gather input and experience from CSOs on how to build citizen engagement activities that contribute towards better results. In this session, panelists and participants will discuss experiences where feedback mechanisms effectively improved outcomes.  They will also share insights on how the Bank Group can effectively mainstream citizen engagement in a way that produces better development results, and will provide an update on plans for strategy development.
 


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Friday, April 11

9:00 - 10:30
Room: I 2 - 220

CAO Case on Eco Oro (Colombia)

Sponsor: SOMOS (Netherlands)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: I 2 - 250

Financial Tremors in Developing Countries: Is Another Earthquake On The Way?

Sponsors: Center of Concern, Bretton Woods Project

Panelists: Aldo Caliari (Director, Rethinking Bretton Woods Project, Center of Concern), Peter Chowla (Executive Director, Bretton Woods Project), Amar Bhattacharya (Director, G24 Secretariat)

During the 2013 summer, the US Federal Reserve looked set to sneeze, but before it did the rest of the world had already caught the cold. Yet again in January of this year, the prospect of ‘tapering’, or rich countries’ easing-off of the unprecedented financial support (counted in the trillions of dollars) led to reverberations in developing countries and so-called emerging markets whose currencies and stock markets struggled.

This session seeks to analyze the ongoing risks and explore proposals to remedy a failing and out of date international economic architecture that generates them. What reforms can provide a solution to the problems associated to a domestic currency acting as the primary reserve and trading currency?  Can a sovereign debt resolution mechanism make credit provision more stable? Should developing countries rely more on tools such as capital controls, reserve accumulation, and expansionary monetary policies, and do they risk stigma for doing so?

 

9:00 - 10:30
Room: I 2 - 210 

Update on WDR 15 on Mind and Culture

Sponsor: WBG (WDR 15 Team)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: I 2 - 250 

World Bank Forest Policy and the Safeguards Review

Sponsors: Ulu Foundation, Urgewald

Panelists:  TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: I 2 - 220

Update on Access to Information

Sponsor: WBG (Access to Information Team)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

11:00 - 13:00
Room: I 2 - 210

Towards a More Inclusive and Comprehensive Measurement Framework for External Development Finance Post-2015

Sponsor: Organization for Economic Co‑operation and Development (OECD)

Panelists: Jon Lomoy  (Director, Development Co-operation Directorate, OECD), CHAIR:  Eric Solheim (Chair of the Development Assistance Committee, OECD)

In order to support the UN’s work on a financial framework for post-2015 sustainable development goals, the OECD-DAC is looking at new ways to measure and monitor external financing for development beyond ODA through the modernisation of its statistical system. This includes:

  1. Elaborating a proposal for a new headline measure of total official support for development (to better capture market-based instruments and resources leveraged from the private sector as well as support for global public goods and policies);
  2. Exploring ways of representing both donor effort and recipient resource receipts;
  3. Investigating whether any resulting new measure suggest the need to modernise the ODA concept; and
  4. Establishing at the latest by 2015, a clear, quantitative definition of concessionality, in line with prevailing financial market conditions.

Objectives of this work include better targeting of ODA, mobilising more resources for the post-2015 sustainable development agenda and increasing their impact through better leveraging of private resources.  This roundtable discussion will be undertaken with the following objectives in mind:  exchange views on new ways to measure external development finance; and provide an opportunity for the DAC to present its work for discussion and input by CSOs.

 

12:30 – 2:00
Room: I 2 - 210

CAO Dispute Resolution: Discussion of Current Cases and Outcomes II

Sponsor: WBG (Compliance Advisor and Ombudsman)

Panelists: Meg Taylor (Vice President, CAO), Gina Lea Barbieri (Senior Specialist, CAO)

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 – 2:00
Room: I 2 - 220

BEYOND Traditional Partnerships: New Approaches to Development Effectiveness

Sponsor: NEPAD Business Group

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

12:30 – 2:00
Room: I 2 - 250

LGBT Rights and Development

Sponsors: GLOBE, Bank Information Center

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:15 – 3:45
Room: I 2 - 210

Update on WBG Consultations Portal

Sponsor: WBG (Global Consultations Team)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:15 – 3:45
Room: I 2 - 220

Sustainability at the World Bank – an Assessment

Sponsor: World Resources Institute (WRI)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:15 – 3:45
Room: I 2 - 250

Mainstreaming Labor Standards at the World Bank from Safeguards to Country Strategies (lessons from MENA)

Sponsors: TBC

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: I 2 - 220

Engaging NGOs/CSOs in Economic Development and Public Policy Dialogues for Sustainable Development

Sponsor: International Association of Africa Non-governmental Organizations (IAAN)

Panelists: TBC

Civil society and different community organizations seek to participate in social, economic, and political life in a meaningful way to address issues of common concern. Whether volunteering in the community, expressing views at a public forum, voting in elections, or protesting against government corruption, peoples’ active participation in public life is vital to strong democratic institutions. Therefore, citizen’s participation in the democratic process is a hallmark of good governance. A government that is accountable to its citizens is one of the fundamentals of democratic development and economic growth. Government officials and decision makers are helping to ensure fairness, economic equality, access, and civic participation in the political process through various civil society engagements mechanisms. This in-turn helps to harness the enormous potential and tacit knowledge within the civil society for economic growth and sustainable development.

During this session, government and policy makers will share their experience on how they have successfully harnessed the potential within CSOs for sustainable development in the country. The discussion will examine engagement strategies and tools that have and can be used.

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: I 2 - 210

The Future of Doing Business

Sponsors: EURODAD, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), International Working Group on Trade-Finance Linkages

Panelists: TBC

The Doing Business Report is one of the most influential World Bank publications which recently came under the scrutiny of an Independent Panel commissioned by World Bank President Jim Kim to assess its value and accuracy. The panel came to some clear conclusions about existing methodological problems and noted that in its current form it undermines the credibility of the World Bank. They put forward several proposals that address these shortcomings and increase the Report's ability to promote good development results. The purpose of this session will be to facilitate a round table discussion that analyzes the Panel's findings and recommendations, gathers input from a broad range of stakeholders on how Doing Business should look in the future.

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: I 2 - 250

What Does Real Accountability Mean in Practice?: Lessons from IFC’s investment in Corporacion Dinant and Tata Ultra Mega

Sponsors: Rights Action, Bank Information Center, Oxfam

Panelists: Dr. Bharat Patel (Secretary General, Machimar Adhikar Sangharsh Sangathan / MASS), Kate Geary (Policy Adviser for Private Sector Investments, Oxfam International)

The IFC response to two recent CAO audit reports displayed the level of preparedness of management to own up to its serious oversight responsibilities and demonstrate accountability to the adversely impacted communities. This session will discuss the troubling human rights, social, and environmental conditions on the ground months after the release of the CAO reports and consider how to bring about institutional improvements as the World Bank deals with the costs of complex and high-risk investments like those in Corporacion Dinant (Honduras) and Tata Ultra Mega (India)

 

5:30 – 7:00
Room: MC 10 - 507

Inspection Panel Reception

Sponsor: Inspection Panel

As part of the World Bank/IMF Spring Meetings 2014, the Inspection Panel would be pleased to welcome Forum participants to its traditional Open House. Come and meet the Panel Members and staff of its Secretariat, learn how the Panel works, and exchange views with us.

The Inspection Panel is an independent complaints mechanism for people who believe that they have been, or are likely to be, adversely affected by a World Bank-funded project. The Panel provides for accountability through assessment of Bank's compliance with operational policies. The process is designed to provide redress to affected people and address issues of policy non-compliance and harm.

* Refreshments will be served.

 


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Saturday, April 12

9:00 - 11:00
Room: I 2 - 250 

Update on WBG Safeguard's Review Process

Sponsor: WBG (Safeguards Review Team)

Speaker: Mark King (Chief Environmental and Social Standards Officer, WBG)

The purpose of this session will be two folds.  First, to provide an update on the safeguards review process. Second, to seek input and feedback on a consultation plan for phase two of the review to ensure: buy-in of the process; and ample participation by civil society groups. The discussion will provide an opportunity to identify opportunities for engagement as well as potential risks for the review process.

 

9:00 - 11:00
Room: I 2 - 250

Empowering Civil Society: How to improve accountability and service delivery through open budgeting? 

Sponsor:  WBG (World Bank Institute)

Panelists: TBC

Session details forthcoming

 

9:00 – 10:30
Room: I 2 - 210

The Voice of Young Business Leaders: G-20Y Association mission and G-20Y Summit 2014 agenda

Sponsor: G - 20Y Association

Panelists: Barbara Kreissler (Head Business Partnerships Group, United Nations Industrial Development Organization), CHAIR: Ksenia Khoruzhnikova (Founder and President, G-20Y Association),

The session will begin with a brief introduction of the G-20Y Association mission and past G-20Y Summits. (see www.g20ys.org for more detailed information). The discussion will then focus on presenting the agenda for the upcoming G-20Y 2014 Summit to be held in Montreux, Switzerland on September 10-14, 2014.  The plan is for some 100 c-level representatives from leading international companies to draft, over ten committee sessions, the final G-20Y Summit Communiqué.  This Communiqué will, in turn, be presented at the Civil Society Policy Forum to be held during the 2014 Annual Meetings.

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: I 2 - 220

WBG Engagement in Health Public Private Partnerships (PPPs): Recent Experiences of a PPP Hospital in Lesotho

Sponsors: Oxfam International, Consumer Protection Association of Lesotho

Panelists: Lehlohonolo Chefa (Director, Consumer Protection Association of Lesotho), Ceri Averill (Health Policy Advisor, OXFAM)

The Lesotho public private partnership (PPP) hospital is the first of its kind in Africa. It has been heralded as opening a new era for private sector involvement in health care in Africa and celebrated as a flagship model to be replicated across the continent. Drawing on Lesotho’s recent experience, this session will consider the opportunities and risks associated with this kind of health PPP in low-income countries. A number of key questions will be addressed by the panel, including:

  • What lessons does the Lesotho PPP offer for low-income country governments, especially African governments?
  • Do health PPPs of this kind represent value for money for low-income country governments?
  • What evidence is available on the costs and benefits of partnering with the private sector in this way?
  • What added value can and should IFC advisory services bring in terms of ensuring sustainability, equity and efficiency of health PPPs?

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: I 2 - 210

What Role for Finance in the Transformation of Economies to Higher Levels of Development and How to Avoid the Pitfalls of Excessive Financialisation

Sponsor: Overseas Development Institute (ODI)

Panelists: Avinash Persaud (Chairman, Intelligence Capital), Stephany Griffith Jones (Research Associate, ODI and Financial Markets Director Initiative for Policy Dialogue, Columbia University), Thorsten Beck (Professor of Banking and Finance at Cass Business School, London),  Alison Brown (Professor, School of Planning and Geography, Cardiff University),  CHAIR: Dirk Willem te Velde (Head of Programme, International Economic Development Group / IEDG)

The DFID-ESRC Growth Research Programme (DEGRP) funds research on agriculture, innovation and finance, and growth in low income countries. DEGRP research in the finance theme examines how financial structures and financial sector depth is related to economic growth and transformation. This session will draw on existing DEGRP research and other financial sector research and practice to examine what role for finance in the transformation of economies to higher levels of development and how to avoid to pitfalls of excessive financialisation? It will also map out a future research agenda that might inform future calls for research.

 

11:00 – 12:30
Room: I 2 - 250

IMF Recommendations to Arab Countries in Transition: Challenges & Prospects

Sponsors: Arab NGO Network for Development (ANND); Bretton Woods Project; Middle East Task Force of the New America Foundation

Panelists: Kinda Mohamadieh (Regional Advisor, Arab NGO Network for Development), Dr. Mohamad Saadi (Professor, Casablanca University), Leila Hilal (Director, Middle East Task Force at the New America Foundation),  CHAIR: Ziad Abdel Samad  (Executive Director, Arab NGO Network for Development)

The IMF has been the protagonist in molding the macroeconomic agenda of countries in the Arab region. For three decades and since the implementation of the IMF-backed Structural Adjustment Programs (SAPs) in the 1980s, many Arab country economies have not only failed to achieve sustainable growth rates but have become even more dependent on outside assistance. Recently, the IMF responded to the waves of popular uprisings by offering new loans to Arab countries in transition. This assistance, however, is contingent on specific economic reform policies that local authorities are expected to adhere to, and which often take the form of traditional austerity measures including decreasing government spending and the unwinding of subsidies. 

This session will specifically discuss the following policy areas: (i) IMF-proposed austerity measures; (ii) IMF trade and investment policies; and (iii) IMF subsidy reform in the Arab region.

 

2:15 – 3:45
Room: I 2 - 250

Reforming IMF Conditionality. Where do we Stand?

Sponsors: Arab NGO Network for Development (ANND), EURODAD, Oxfam, ITUC

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

2:15 – 3:45
Room: I 2 - 220

Evaluation of  Fragile and Conflict States

Sponsor: WBG (Independent Evaluation Group)

Panelists: TBC

Session description forthcoming

 

4:00 – 5:30
Room: I 2 - 220

Reaching Every Newborn: A Stepping Stone Towards Universal Health Coverage

Sponsor: Save the Children / UK

Panelists:  Simon Wright (Head of Child Survival, Save the Children UK), Tim Evans (Director, Health, Nutrition and Population, WBG)

The first 24 hours of a newborn baby’s life are the most dangerous. In 2012, 2.9 million babies died within their first month of life and one million of these on their first – and only – day of life. In addition, there were 1.2m intrapartum stillbirths. Global targets for child mortality won’t be achieved unless we urgently tackle the crisis of newborn deaths and this means ensuring that no family is denied life-saving care at birth.

At this session, we will present key findings from Ending Newborn Deaths report. We will discuss the links between newborn survival and UHC, and the opportunity of a universal newborns target to be a stepping stone for accelerating progress towards UHC.

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Last updated: 2014-03-20




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