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HIV/AIDS and Education - Publications


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key publications

Accelerating the Education Sector Response to HIV : Five Years of Experience from Sub-Saharan Africa (pdf, 0.4MB)
Donald Bundy, Anthi Patrikios, Changu Mannathoko, Andy Tembon, Stella Manda, Bachir Sarr, Lesley Drake. 2010
This review shows how, over the last five years, the leadership in ministries of education has been crucial in mobilizing these activities, and also emphasizes that effective implementation depends on the full participation of all stakeholders.

Courage and Hope: Stories from Teachers Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa (pdf, 2.3MB)
Donald Bundy, David Aduda, Alice Woolnough, Lesley Drake, Stella Manda. 2009
The book provides the personal stories of 12 HIV-positive teachers from Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania and Zambia. The stories, recorded by African journalists in each of the above countries, offer courage and hope to the other teachers living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

Education and HIV/AIDS: A Sourcebook of HIV/AIDS Prevention Programs Vol. 2 (pdf, 1.6MB)
Michael Beasley, Alexandria Valerio, Donald Bundy. 2008
This sourcebook aims to support efforts by countries to strengthen the role of the education sector in the prevention of HIV/AIDS. It was developed in response to numerous requests for a simple forum to help countries share their practical experiences of designing and implementing programs that are targeted at school-age children. The sourcebook seeks to fulfill this role by providing concise summaries of programs, using a standard format that highlights the main elements of the programs and makes it easier to compare the programs with each other.

Courage and Hope: Stories from Teachers Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa (pdf, 1MB)
World Bank. 2008
The stories documented here give voice to the real life experiences of 12 HIV-positive teachers, five of whom are women, from Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania (both Mainland and Zanzibar) and Zambia. The teachers recount their experiences of discovering their HIV-positive status and how this has affected them in their families, their communities, and their professional lives.

Strengthening the Education Sector Response to HIV&AIDS in the Caribbean (pdf, 2MB)
UNESCO/World Bank Parthership. 2007
This report presents the findings and outcomes of the three joint UNESCO/WB missions to Guyana, Jamaica and St. Lucia, and elaborates on next steps identified for action at both national and regional levels. The report also sets these findings and next steps within the broader context of the Caribbean plan for action and presents in its appendicies, sample resources to guide the development of a comprehensive response to HIV & AIDS by the education sector.

Accelerating the Education Sector Response to HIV and AIDS: Five Years On (pdf, 1.1MB)
A Working Group of the UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on Education. 2007
The purpose of this review is to assess the extent to which the Accelerate Initiative’s planned actions achieved its five objectives identified by the working group in 2002. The review explores the achievements and progress made by different countries and examines the extent to which they might be associated with countries’ participation in the Initiative.

Ensuring Education Access for Orphans and Vulnerable Children: A Planners’ Handbook (pdf, 784KB). 2nd Edition
World Bank, PCD, and UNICEF. 2006
The handbook contains eight sections. Sections one to seven enable users to examine different issues relating to the education of orphans and vulnerable children in their country. These sections can either be used sequentially or as “stand alone” resources for discussion and thought. Section eight contains a sample “response template” that enables users to identify key aspects of responses to priority issues identified.

Modeling the Impact of HIV/AIDS on Education Systems: How to Use the Ed-SIDA Model for Education-HIV/AIDS Forecasting (pdf, 917KB). 2nd Edition
World Bank and PCD, 2006
The purpose of this document is two-fold. It serves as a practical training manual for World Bank staff, Ministry of Education planners and other stakeholders who wish to implement the Ed-SIDA model in a particular country to assist with educational planning in the face of HIV/AIDS. It also
serves as an introduction to the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS, the impact it can have on the education sector, its scale and how this can be captured empirically by the Ed-SIDA model.

Accelerating the Education Sector Response to HIV/AIDS in Africa: A Review of World Bank Assistance(pdf, 518 KB)
by Anne Bakilana, Donald Bundy, Jonathon Brown and Birger Fredriksen, 2005
This report examines World Bank financing for the Education Sector HIV/AIDS Response in Sub-Saharan Africa up to mid-2004. The review was undertaken in response to a consultation with African countries which identified a need for information on how the World Bank education sector was responding to the epidemic through its sectoral assistance programs and through its participation in the Multi-Country HIV/AIDS Program (MAP). Documents and data were reviewed, and key informants interviewed. The review offers recommendations for countries and donors, and specifically for the World Bank.

Operational Guidelines for Supporting Early Child Development (ECD) in Multi-Sectoral HIV/AIDS Programs in Africa (pdf, 4.55 MB )
World Bank, UNICEF, UNAIDS, 2003
This document explains why services that address young children's needs are essential and how they may be fully integrated within the framework of a national multi-sectoral HIV/AIDS program. The World Bank, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), and the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) are collaborating in this initiative. It is the first step in a larger plan of cooperation among agencies to ensure that young children have the best start in life.

A Sourcebook of HIV/AIDS Prevention Programs in the Education Sector (pdf, 3MB)
Donald Bundy, 2005
This Sourcebook aims to support efforts by countries to strengthen the role of the education sector in the prevention of HIV/AIDS. It was developed in response to numerous requests for a simple forum to help countries share their practical experiences of designing and implementing programs that are targeted at school-age children. The Sourcebook seeks to fulfill this role by providing concise summaries of programs, using a standard format that highlights the main elements of the programs and makes it easier to compare the programs with each other.  It documents 13 education based HIV/AIDS prevention programs targeting children and youth from 7 sub-Saharan African countries. It is sponsored by UNAIDS, UNICEF, UNESCO, UNFPA, DFID, USAID, Ireland Aid and the World Bank. The Sourcebook represents the work of many contributors (acknowledged in the book), and was developed by the Partnership for Child Development with the World Bank, with principal support from Ireland Aid and the Norwegian Education Trust Fund.

Education and HIV/AIDS: a Window of Hope (2002)  (pdf, 566KB)
World Bank, 2002
The central message of this paper is that the education of children and youth merits the highest priority in a world afflicted by HIV/AIDS. This is because a good basic education ranks among the most effective—and cost-effective—means of HIV prevention. It also merits priority because the very education system that supplies a nation’s future is being gravely threatened by the epidemic, particularly in areas of high or rising HIV prevalence. Thus countries face an urgent need to strengthen their education systems, which offer a window of hope unlike any other for escaping the grip of HIV/AIDS. Vigorous pursuit of Education for All (EFA) goals is imperative, along with education aimed at HIV prevention.

other publications

other publicationsFor the recent and highlighted publications on HIV/AIDS and education, click hereand search under HIV/AIDS for best results.

For a complete listing of World Bank Publicationson HIV/AIDS visit the Publications   
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