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Republic of Congo Joins Global Efforts to Reduce Gas Flaring

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Gas Flaring

June 27, 2012

As part of a global drive to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the World Bank-led Global Gas Flaring Reduction partnership (GGFR) today welcomed the Republic of Congo as the newest partner joining the efforts to reduce gas flaring or the burning of natural gas associated with oil production.



Monsieur Raphaël LoembaThe Republic of Congo’s participation in the GGFR partnership is a key step for enhancing our gas flaring reduction efforts through the international cooperation that the global nature of the flaring problem demands to overcome it. ||  Mr. André Loemba, Minister of Hydrocarbons, Republic of Congo

The Republic of Congo joins more than 30 government and company partners committed to reducing gas flaring to minimum levels worldwide. Other GGFR partners in Sub-Saharan Africa include Angola, Cameroon, Gabon, and Nigeria.

“We welcome the Republic of Congo into the GGFR partnership and look forward to working with them to further reduce the waste of a valuable energy resource that can be used for more productive purposes,” said Sylvie Dossou Kouame, the World Bank’s country manager for the Republic of Congo. “By joining these global efforts the Republic of Congo is showing strong commitment and leadership to improving energy efficiency and reducing emissions associated with oil production.”

Associated gas that comes with oil production is often recovered and used at production facilities or monetized whenever possible. In many countries, however, there are critical barriers to associated gas utilization, including a lack of, or access to, adequate infrastructure, robust domestic gas markets or effective regulations and policies. The World Bank-led partnership between oil-producing countries and companies aims to overcome these barriers by fostering public-private collaboration to reduce the environmentally harmful waste of flared gas.

Sylvie Dossou KouameWe welcome the Republic of Congo into the GGFR partnership and look forward to working with them to further reduce the waste of a valuable energy resource that can be used for more productive purposes. ||  Sylvie Dossou Kouame, the World Bank’s country manager for the Republic of Congo

Global gas flaring, estimated in 2011 at 140 billion cubic meters (bcm), more than the total natural gas consumption in Africa, accounts for at least 360 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions. Eliminating these annual emissions is equivalent to taking some 70 million cars off the road. The major flaring countries in the world are Russia, Nigeria, Iran and Iraq.

The Republic of Congo produces approximately 300,000 barrels per day. According to 2010 satellite estimates, the volume of gas being flared in Congo was around 1.8 bcm per year, equivalent to 10 per cent of the oil production.

“We are conscious of the important challenge of reducing gas flaring and venting, that’s why the Ministry of Hydrocarbons and other agencies have initiated various actions to increase the utilization of associated gas,” said Mr. André Loemba, Minister of Hydrocarbons. “The Republic of Congo’s participation in the GGFR partnership is a key step for enhancing our gas flaring reduction efforts through the international cooperation that the global nature of the flaring problem demands to overcome it.”

Hooman FarnejadWe look forward to a full cooperation with the Republic of Congo so we can achieve even more results for the benefit of all Congolese. Improving energy efficiency and reducing emissions while expanding access to much-needed electricity and cleaner cooking fuels is a win-win for all. || Hooman Farnejad, World Bank’s GGFR coordinator for Africa

The Republic of Congo’s Government and the oil companies operating in the country have taken progressive steps to reduce gas flaring. One of the major projects achieved has been the development of an integrated solution to gas flaring at the M’Boundi oil field by utilizing the associated gas for power generation at the Djeno and the Centrale Eléctrique du Congo (CEC) power plants. The initiative has not only reduced important emissions of greenhouse gases but is also providing electricity to thousands of people.

“We look forward to a full cooperation with the Republic of Congo so we can achieve even more results for the benefit of all Congolese,” said Hooman Farnejad, World Bank’s GGFR coordinator for Africa. “Improving energy efficiency and reducing emissions while expanding access to much-needed electricity and cleaner cooking fuels is a win-win for all.”

Note: The GGFR partners include: Algeria (Sonatrach), Angola (Sonangol), Azerbaijan (SOCAR), Cameroon (SNH), Republic of Congo, France, Gabon, Indonesia, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Khanty-Mansiysk (Russia), Mexico (SENER), Nigeria, Norway, Qatar, the United States (DOE), Uzbekistan; BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ENI, ExxonMobil, Marathon Oil, Maersk Oil & Gas, Pemex, Qatar Petroleum, Shell, Statoil, TOTAL; the European Union, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the World Bank Group; Associated partner: Wärtsilä.

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