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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Header:  ASAP - FAQs 

What is ASAP?
What services does ASAP offer?
Why was ASAP set up?
How does ASAP work?
Where does ASAP work?
Is ASAP part of the World Bank?
Who are ASAP’s partners?
How do I become an ASAP consultant?
Does ASAP provide strategic planning training?


What is ASAP?

The AIDS Strategy and Action Plan (ASAP) service is a one-stop-shop where countries can seek advice and support from UNAIDS to enhance their national HIV/AIDS strategies and actions plans.

What services does ASAP offer?

ASAP provides the following four main services, in response to country requests:

  1. External confidential peer reviews of draft strategies and action plans
  2. Technical support to countries to develop and cost strategies and action plans
  3. Capacity building for country policymakers, program managers and staff, consultants and UNAIDS partners
  4. Tools for use by countries and consultants to help improve and cost strategies and action plans

Why was ASAP set up?

The Global Task Team on Improving AIDS Collaboration among Multinational Institutions and International Donors (the GTT), identified the need for a global technical assistance program to enable UNAIDS to support development of more evidence-based, results-focused and costed national AIDS strategies and annual action plans. Acting on a GTT recommendation, ASAP was set up in 2006. A first business plan, developed with a group of technical advisors, committed the ASAP service to providing on demand, flexible assistance to: (i) arrange technical support to help countries to develop solid strategies and action plans that can be implemented efficiently and effectively; (ii) build country capacity; and (iii) develop tools, share knowledge and promote coordination and harmonization in strategic and operational planning.

How does ASAP work?

Countries make requests to the ASAP Secretariat and ASAP then works quickly, in a consultative and collaborative way, to meet the country’s need. The process may vary but is typically as follows:

A request for ASAP support is sent to the ASAP secretariat (usually by email to asap@worldbank.org). Most requests come from National AIDS Councils, UNAIDS Country Coordinators or Regional Support Teams.

In response, ASAP convenes a teleconference with all involved partners, to clarify what sort of support is needed, ensure broad ownership in country (including that of the Joint UN Team on HIV/AIDS), identify tasks and technical and financing roles that other partners can play; and agree on technical and financing gaps that ASAP can fill.

ASAP then helps prepare Terms of Reference (TOR) and identifies and hires consultants, often in collaboration with the UNAIDS Technical Support Facilities.

Where does ASAP work?

The regional breakdown of 39 requests to ASAP (June 2006 to March 2008) is as follows:

  • 20 from Sub-Saharan Africa
  • 10 from Latin America
  • 5 from Caribbean
  • 4 from the Middle East and North Africa
  • 3 from Central/Eastern Europe
  • 3 from South Asia
  • 2 from East Asia

Is ASAP part of the World Bank?

ASAP is a service of UNAIDS housed within the Global HIV/AIDS Program of the World Bank. Recommendations of the GTT and the UNAIDS Division of Labor gave the World Bank lead responsibility in the area of strategic and action planning for HIV/AIDS, in close collaboration with the UNAIDS Secretariat and cosponsors. The small ASAP secretariat relies on existing staff from the World Bank and other UNAIDS cosponsors, UNAIDS Technical Support Facilities, and a growing roster of tested consultants to provide support to countries world-wide.

Who are ASAP’s partners?

The central importance of partnerships was one of the main lessons learned from the first year of experience in ASAP. Key partners include the UNAIDS Secretariat (at headquarters, Regional Support Teams and UNAIDS Country Offices), national governments, and UN partners.

How do I become an ASAP consultant?

ASAP is interested in adding to its roster of experienced consultants. Please send your CV to asap@worldbank.org if you would like to be considered for assignments in one or more of the following areas:

  • Strategic Planning
  • Epidemiological synthesis and evidence base building
  • Resource needs modeling and activity-based costing
  • Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Prevention, care and treatment, impact mitigation, mainstreaming

Does ASAP provide strategic planning training?

ASAP has a capacity strengthening program in strategy and action planning for high-level policy makers, program managers and staff, and technical experts. The Instituto Nacional de Salud Publico of Mexico leads a consortium of seven training partners covering different regions, and works closely with the World Bank Institute, UNAIDS Co-sponsors and the UNAIDS Secretariat and Regional Support Teams. ASAP capacity strengthening work is guided by the “AIDS Training Advisory Committee for Strategy (PRSP and ASAP), Resource Tracking, Mainstreaming and Costing”, which is chaired by UNDP. To participate in ASAP training, a development partner must be nominated by the UNAIDS RST or UCC, or by their National AIDS Council.

 


Last updated: 2011-05-02