Click here for search results

Food Price Watch

Food Price Watch, produced by the Poverty Reduction and Equity group at the World Bank, is a series that aims at drawing attention to trends in domestic food prices in low- and middle-income countries and their policy implications.

LATEST EDITIONFood Price Watch landing page

August 2012 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF | Related pageONLINE]
Abrupt food price increases, triggered by droughts in the U.S. and Eastern Europe, have turned favorable prospects for the year upside down. World Bank experts do not currently foresee a repeat of 2008, but additional negative factors could push the situation in a critical direction.

PAST EDITIONS

April 2012 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF | Related pageONLINE]
Global food prices rose by 8 percent during the first quarter of 2012 and were just 6 percent below their February 2011 historical peak in March. All key food prices except rice jumped due to bad weather and expensive oil.

January 2012 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF | Related pageONLINE]
Food prices have fallen since peaking a year ago. Still, the 2011 annual food index exceeded the 2010 average by 24 percent. People worldwide are trying to adjust.

November 2011 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF | Related pageONLINE]
Global food prices remain high and volatile, but growing food supplies and a lackluster economy may improve the situation in coming months.

August 2011 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF | Related pageONLINE]
Global food prices remain near their peak levels from 2008 and domestic food prices continue to fluctuate widely, putting the poorest people at greater risk.

April 2011 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF | Related pageONLINE]
Poor people in poorer countries are facing higher food inflation. We need urgent policies and actions to minimize the burden on the poor.

February 2011 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF | Related pageONLINE]
While the global focus on food prices has waned, domestic staple food prices in several countries have experienced double digit increases in 2009, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. This issue highlights countries where such increases are most significant and estimate that the impact on undernourishment, or hunger, has been as much as 8% in 2009.

December 2010 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF ]
The World Bank food price index rose by 17% between August and November 2010 and is now 11% below its June 2008 peak in nominal terms and 8% below the peak in real terms. Adverse weather conditions in major cereal producing countries have contributed to price rises for wheat, maize and rice.

September 2010 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF ]
In the first six months of 2010, global staple grain prices were on a downward trend. While in many countries staple food prices remained stable, staple prices still increased sharply in some countries with high levels of poverty.

May 2010 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF ]
Analysis of domestic staple food price data since 2006 suggests that food price volatility is a growing concern. In recent months domestic food prices have risen sharply in South Asia and in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, even though global grain prices have declined over the past year.

February 2010 [ acrobat pdf iconPDF ]
Analysis of domestic staple food price data since 2006 suggests that food price volatility is a growing concern. In recent months domestic food prices have risen sharply in South Asia and in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, even though global grain prices have declined over the past year.




Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/JA4CUPKLJ0