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BBL - Measuring and Managing for Sustainable Cities

Tuesday, January 19, 2010
04:00 pm - 05:30 pm

BBL sponsored by
the Urban Environment and Climate Change Thematic Group (UECC)
of the Urban Development and Local Government Unit


measuring and managing event picture


Background:
Cities are the most complex systems developed by humanity. To build and manage cities, tools, good planning principles, and professional management practices are needed. This session reviews new tools, such as city-based GHG emissions, and looks at how critical infrastructure like roads and transit determine the long-term shape - and quality of life - for cities.


Moderator
John Kellenberg, Sector Manager, Environment, ECSS3


Presenters
Chris Kennedy,
Professor, University of Toronto
City Metabolism and GHG Index  (pdf)


Additional Discussants
Donna McIntire,
Buildings & Climate Change Officer
United Nations Environment Program, Division of Technology, Industry and Economics
Common Carbon Metric – for Buildings
Monali Ranade,
Carbon Finance Specialist, ENVCF
A city-wide approach to Carbon Finance
Daniel Hoornweg,
Lead Urban Specialist, FEUUR
New tools for sustainable cities

Measuring a city's GHG emissions is important, but only one part of a more comprehensive strategy. Cities can be looked at as large ecosystems with their own metabolisms. How this metabolism operates can have profound impacts on GHG emissions and quality of life for the urban poor. Similarly the transportation corridors become the bones of a city's body, locking in the shape and decades of emissions. Buildings are also critical to long term emissions and quality of life. Two of the most important aspects of a city's long term environmental impact are its transportation systems and its buildings.

This session highlighted how the Bank and our key partners are addressing issues like transportation and buildings as we work with our partners to build more sustainable tools. A few of the new tools and programs recently developed were highlighted.

 




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