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Export Competitiveness: Key Industries

  Competitiveness in Key Industries

Industry specific issues are among the most important constraints to export competitiveness even though they are rarely on the short list of economic development priorities of governments and donors alike. Coordination issues between public infrastructure and private investments are common in various industries including tourism, apparel, and agribusiness.

It is notable that more than 70 per cent of low income country exports come from five key industries of:  agribusiness, mining, tourism, ICT and apparel.  Issues and binding constraints are significantly overlapping in these industries across countries.

This web page is a FIAS contribution to this website.


 

 

  Papers

Industry Level Analysis:  The Way to Identify the Binding Constraints to Economic Growth
Author: Vincent Palmade
Source: WB Policy Research Working Paper 3551, March 2005

Over ten years of economic research done by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) showed in details how industry specific policy and enforcement issues were the main constraints to private investment and fair competition – the two drivers of productivity and thus economic growth. The MGI country studies were uniquely based on the in-depth analysis of a representative sample of industries where clear causality links could be established between factors in the firms’ external environment and their behavior, in particular through the analysis of competitive dynamics. This finding implies that governments and international financial institutions should rely much more on in-depth industry level analysis to uncover product market competition issues and set reform priorities.


  Resources on Key Industries

Agri Business and Forestry

A Diagnostic Checklist

The purpose of this checklist is to help developing countries quickly identify the most important issues which might affect the development of the agro business industry (also called the food processing sector).

 

Establishing Corporate Social Drivers in Agribusiness (2006)

Author: Anne Tallontire, Perter Greenhalgh
Source: FIAS & IFC, August 2005, the World Bank

 

This report provides an overview of recent trends in CSR codes of conduct in the agriculture sector and explores how VCA can be used to highlight the nature of codes, what drives their adoption and factors affecting their implementation.  

  

Indonesia:  Case Study of Textile and Farmed Shrimp Industries (2006) 
Source: FIAS & IFC, September 2006, The World Bank Group/IFC

In this paper, the main issues raised by industry stakeholders in Indonesia are discussed, together with some actionable public policy and private sector recommendations for remedying them based on international experience and practices.

Apparel
  

A Diagnostic Checklist

The purpose of this checklist is to help developing countries quickly identify the most important issues which might affect the development of the apparel sector.

Lesotho: Competitiveness and Corporate Social Responsibility (June 06)

Source: FIAS & IFC, June 2006, the World Bank Group

This report discusses challenges and opportunities for Lesothotextile industry after the phase-out of the Multi-Fiber Arrangement in 2005 and scheduled 2007 expiration of the third-country fabric provision in the African Growth and Opportunity Act.  

Lesotho: Competitiveness of Regional and Vertical Integration (Draft, April 2006)

Source: FIAS & IFC, April 2006, the World Bank Group

 

This report discusses the opportunity for Lesotho textile industry to improve competitiveness through integration. Both regional and vertical integration with cotton-knit fabric resources in other countries can reduce the current cost and lead times.

Lesotho: Market Diversification of the Garment Industry (Draft, April 2006)

Source: FIAS & IFC, April 2006, the World Bank Group

Lesotho will be seeking to diversify its markets and customer bases as the global textile and apparel industries go through seismic changes. To assist the goal of market diversification, Lesotho’s government-sponsored export promotion and training will need to research the realities in EU and US market, and make appropriate policies.

Housing

Housing:  A Diagnostic Checklist

The purpose of this checklist is to help developing countries quickly identify the most important issues which might affect the development of the housing construction sector.

ICT:  China - Report on Corporate Social Responsibility (Draft, June 2007)

Source: FIAS & IFC, July 12, 2007, the World Bank Group

Focus on Shenzhen, this project is designed to identify and test strategies and activities that will most likely improve social and environmental conditions and also provide business benefits to the ICT supply chain.

Land Market:  A Diagnostic Checklist

Source: the World Bank Group

 

Where land markets function poorly, they can constrain private sector development by making it difficult for investors to start or expand businesses and to borrow capital. The purpose of this checklist is to help developing countries quickly identify the most important issues which might affect the development of the land market.

Retail Business:  A Diagnostic Checklist
Source: the World Bank Group

The purpose of this checklist is to help developing countries quickly identify the most important issues which might affect the development of the retail sector.

Tourism
  

Tourism:  A Diagnostic Checklist

Source: the World Bank Group

 

Tourism is one of the largest and fastest growing sectors in the world and a major driver of growth for developing countries. The purpose of this checklist is to help developing countries quickly identify the most important issues which might affect the development of the tourism.

Corporate Social Responsibility: The Status and Potentials for Certification and Codes of Conduct in Tourism (June 2005)

Author:  Rachel Dodds, Marion Joppe

Source: CSR Practice Foreign Investment Advisory Service Investment Climate Department, June 2005, the World Bank

 

This study assesses whether the development of national certification schemes may help countries to a) address expectations of tourists, investors and supply chain actors, b) ensure the sustainable development of their tourism industry, c) ensure a localization of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) agenda and d) whether certification schemes have contributed to spreading sustainable tourism practices.

Mozambique: Value Chain in Tourism Volume I and Volume II (Aug, 2006)

Source: FIAS, August 2006, the World Bank Group

 

This study determines the salient features of the value chains in Mozambique’s tourism sector and to identify the opportunities and constraints that might keep the sector from fulfilling its economic and social potential.

Sierra Leone: Competitiveness and Corporate Social Responsibility in Tourism and Mining (August 2006)

Source: FIAS & IFC, August 2006, the World Bank Group

 

Both tourism and mining sectors have large potentials to contribute to the Sierra Leonean economy, but both sectors face an adverse operating environment and significant obstacles to development. This study discusses the opportunities and strategies for Sierra Leone to improve its competitiveness and CSR system in tourism and mining sectors.

 

  Web sites
FIAS website lists a series of technical assistance provided around the world in some of these industries.  It also offers guidelines, manuals, and toolkits which might be useful for practitioners in this field.



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