Click here for search results

Peru Governance Diagnostics

spacer_20x3spacer_10x2spacer_10x2spacer_10x2spacer_10x2spacer_10x2

View timeline of Peru Governance Diagnostic Study

Aboutperu_flag.jpg

The economic and political history of Peru of the past decade shows that the country has a considerable potential for growth but still faces significant challenges. As the most recent Country Assistance Strategy Progress Report (CASPR, 2001-see below) and the Institutional and Governance Review for Peru (IGR, 2001-see below) suggest, between 1994 and 1997 Peru made important progresses in the fight against poverty. This trend was reversed over the following three years, with the poverty incidence rate climbing back to 1994 levels. The critical challenge faced by the new government in Peru lies however in the fragile institutions and weakened governance.

About

Questionnaires

Final Reports

Impact

Resources

Partners

Contact Us

The collapse of the Fujimori Administration in the middle of corruption scandals raised awareness in the country about the need for a long-term anti-corruption strategy. In early January, the Minister of Justice, Dr. Garcia Sayan, was appointed by interim President Paniagua as the head of the task force in charge of designing such strategy and immediately requested the World Bank's assistance.

Back to topBack to top

Questionnaires

To respond to the request for assistance by President Paniagua, the WBI implemented an in-depth diagnostic study based on three separate surveys of 1,696 households, 401 private enterprises and 1,123 public officials. The rationale for a survey-oriented approach is that voicing the experiences of the people who interact with the State and implement State policies is essential for the development of a well-informed and effective anti-corruption strategy.

Note: These three files have a Panama address on the cover page, but are surveys that were conducted in Peru.

Back to topBack to top

Final Reports

The diagnostic effort undertaken provides significant inputs to policy makers and civil society for program formulation and implementation. The detailed micro data from the surveys helps asses the real extent of this problem. It provides rich information on the different sides of corruption and allows us to link different forms of corruption to specific institutional and regional aspects as well as test the accuracy of some of the "myths" surrounding governance. In addition, the in-depth analysis further complements traditional sources as experts' opinions or case study analysis, by identifying institutional weaknesses, areas for reform and by measuring the economic and social costs of corruption.

Reports

The Peru Governance and Anticorruption Report (GAC Report) summarizes the findings of the diagnostic study carried out through three large-scale surveys between February and March 2001. Its main objective is to support the anticorruption effort and commitment in Peru. The report presents evidence on a number of key reform aspects in Peru and much of the information contained in the data is still under analysis. In particular, the GAC Report provides rich insights onto:

  • governance strengths and weaknesses across key institutions in Peru, contrasting the vulnerabilities of many institutions with the good example of others,
  • the developmental/economic costs of weak governance and corruption, and,
  • possible sources for improved governance and public service delivery of the institutions in Peru.

The GAC Report was not designed to provide answers to all questions arising from the data, but rather to encourage a focus debate on how to promote anticorruption efforts in Peru. It is intended to serve as a concrete input to action by Peruvians in their strive to improve governance in their country.

Dissemination

A preliminary version of the main findings of the GAC Report was presented at the "Ia Conferencia Nacional Anti-corrupción", held in Lima, June 26–28, 2001, for discussion with the government and the civil society. A revised version of the GAC Report was used as input for the Anticorruption Strategy developed by the INA and presented to President Toledo by President Paniagua at the end of his mandate (July 2001).

Back to topBack to top

Impact

After completing the diagnostic work, the INA created a governance and anti-corruption strategy and the government accordingly implemented policies and reforms. Below are links to the government of Peru's Anti-corruption Strategy and initiatives set forth to improve governance and combat corruption.

Strategy

National Initiatives

Policy/Reforms

  • INA Legislative Initiatives(in Spanish)—For additional information concerning laws passed and policies implemented as a result of our diagnostic work.

Local Capacity Building

Back to topBack to top

Resources

World Bank


Non-World Bank

Back to topBack to top

Partners

In April 2001, the President and the Minister established the "Iniciativa Nacional Anti-Corrupcion-INA," a committee with the task of promoting a national workshop with representatives of major agencies in charge of the fight against corruption and developing an anti-corruption strategy. With the support of the World Bank and other international donors, the Ministry organized a public event that signaled the initiation of a Bank-sponsored diagnostic study of corruption in Peru.

Steering Committee for Peru

Other Partners

Back to topBack to top

Contact Us

For additional information regarding WBI's diagnostic work in Peru, please contact:

Hala Hanna 
E-mail: hhanna@worldbank.org

For technical inquiries or questions about our website, please contact Maria Juan at mjuan@worldbank.org

Back to topBack to top



Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/K5Y8G4A1D0