Poverty Analysis http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/taxonomy/term/5630/all en Less Poor but More Unequal http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/less-poor-more-unequal <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="160" alt="Photo: Scott Wallace" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/scott_wallace_1116868081_de4fb7102c_o.jpg" width="240" align="left" />First, the good news: The world has become considerably less poor. Today, 43 percent of people are considered to be living in poverty—that is, living on less than $2 per day—compared to 30 years ago when almost three-fourths of the developing world was doing so. Even more heartening is that extreme poverty—that is, living on less than $1.25 per day to meet the most basic human needs—has declined even more.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 25 Apr 2012 15:35:54 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8814 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth Should We Still Worry About Food Prices? http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/should-we-still-worry-about-food-prices <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="158" alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/quy_toan_do_-_world_bank.jpg" width="240" align="right" />Food prices are finally coming down after a year of spikes and high volatility. But we must remain vigilant. Prices of certain foods remain very high, and millions of people around the world are still at risk of suffering from malnutrition and hunger.<br /><br />Let’s get to the numbers first.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 01 Feb 2012 14:31:29 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8799 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth Food Prices and the 7 Billionth Baby http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/food-prices-and-7-billionth-baby <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="378" alt="Photo: World Bank" width="250" align="right" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/photo_baby_worldbank.jpg" />Turmoil is not solely circumscribed to Wall Street and stock markets around the world. Volatility is also affecting global food prices, and with them, millions of people in developing countries. So, just as the world marks the birth of the 7 billionth baby this week, his or her family might be struggling to put food on the table.<br /></p></div></div></div> Wed, 02 Nov 2011 13:32:16 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8791 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth Jobs, Jobs, Jobs http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/jobs-jobs-jobs-0 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="225" alt="Photo: Wiki Commons User, Kozuch" width="150" align="left" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/wiki_commons_user_kozuch.jpg" />Market volatility, fears of a double-dip, lack of investor confidence and social demonstrations from Wall Street to Main Streets around the world are just some of the headlines we face today.<br /></p></div></div></div> Wed, 19 Oct 2011 13:35:51 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8790 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth Trade Finance and the Financial Crisis http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/trade-finance-and-financial-crisis <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="159" alt="Photo: Jonathan Ernst" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/trade_finanace_jonathan_ernst.jpg" width="240" align="left" />As the 2008-9 financial crisis spread from its epicenter in the United States to the rest of the world, policy makers found themselves in uncharted waters. The effects of the global contraction were so severe that the world experienced the largest drop in global trade volumes since World War II, with world trade of goods falling by 23 percent in 2009.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 28 Sep 2011 15:08:51 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8788 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth Gender and Trade http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/gender-and-trade-0 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="322" alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/5094762102_1432bf25aa.jpg" width="250" align="right" />Gender inequality and discrimination can affect many areas of life, from a women’s access to basic health services to her prospects for education and future earnings. Accordingly, in order to overcome these disparities, development practitioners have begun to collect gender-disaggregated data and address gender elements in the design and implementation of aid programs.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 27 Jul 2011 15:29:04 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8783 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth Managing Economic Policy in a Multipolar World http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/managing-economic-policy-multipolar-world <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="159" alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/ep57.jpg" width="240" align="left" />It’s no secret that current account imbalances exist around the world. In many cases, these imbalances may be benign and merely reflect market-driven differences in savings and investment or differences in stages of development. In other cases, persistent global imbalances may be unsustainable and may threaten growth in the long-run. Thus, it’s no surprise that addressing imbalances has been a key focus in recent G-20 discussions.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 18 May 2011 15:10:57 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8775 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth South-South Trade is the Answer http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/south-south-trade-answer <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="240" alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/aidfortrade.jpg" width="154" align="right" />Istanbul is now at the center of the development action.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 11 May 2011 13:41:04 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8774 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth The Cost of Financial Reform for Emerging Markets http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/cost-financial-reform-emerging-markets <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="167" alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/basel.jpg" width="250" align="right" />In the aftermath of the global economic crisis, financial market regulators have proposed a myriad of reforms to better govern the banking sector and to enhance its resilience to future shocks. In fact, in September 2010, a number of measures were agreed upon by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, an international forum designed to foster cooperation and develop standards on banking supervisory matters.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 27 Apr 2011 14:21:26 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8772 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth Sophisticated Exports http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/sophisticated-exports <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="166" alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/services.jpg" width="250" align="left" />What do call centers in Kenya, accounting companies in Sri Lanka, and human resources firms in Abu Dhabi have in common? From the surface, perhaps not much; but from an international trade perspective, these and other industries represent a fundamental change in how countries are doing business.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 20 Apr 2011 14:44:07 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8771 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth The Food Price Threat to Poor Continues http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/food-price-threat-poor-continues <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="158" alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/foodpricewatchapril.jpg" width="240" align="right" />Groundbreaking events are adding to the list of things pushing up food prices. Erratic weather in key grain exporting countries, the increasing crop use for biofuel production, export restrictions, and low global stocks, have been key contributors to the spike. Now, it is also linked to surging fuel prices connected to events in the Middle East and North Africa.</p></div></div></div> Thu, 14 Apr 2011 13:03:41 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8770 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth Picking Up The Pieces http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/picking-pieces <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=166 alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/files/growth/soldiers_sw-coa-009.jpg" width=250 align=left>For the 600 million people living in fragile and conflict affected economies, the threat of relapsing into violence and slipping into deeper poverty is a reality they must face every day. Believe it or not, poverty rates average 54% in fragile and postconflict economies, compared with 22% for low-income countries as a whole. Weak institutions and a lack of local capacity further undermine the delivery of core services, such as security, rule of law, and other public goods.<BR><BR>So what happens when the fighting stops and the reconstruction begins? What happens to local capacity in countries where qualified civil servants have either fled to escape the conflict or were killed during it? A new study on public financial management reforms, produced by the World Bank’s fragile states and public sector governance units, shows that progress is possible even in such difficult circumstances.</div></div></div> Wed, 06 Apr 2011 14:45:07 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8769 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth Money Can’t Buy Equality http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/money-can-t-buy-equality <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="161" alt="" width="250" align="right" src="/files/growth/South Asia Blog.jpeg" />South Asia has been one of the world’s success stories in terms of rapid economic growth. With India leading the way, South Asia’s poverty rate has fallen from 60 percent in 1981 to 40 percent in 2005. However, during the same period, the number of poor people—those living on less than $1.25 per day—actually increased from 549 million to 595 million over the same period.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 30 Mar 2011 14:50:21 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8768 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth The Poor Are Paying the Price of the Food Cost Spike http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/poor-are-paying-price-food-cost-spike <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="167" alt="" width="250" align="left" src="/files/growth/FOOD3491850967_1570715001_m(1).jpg" />2008 is so last decade. And yet, the recent hike in food prices is bringing food costs near the dangerous levels of that year, creating enormous vulnerabilities in developing countries.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 16 Feb 2011 15:13:30 +0000 Otaviano Canuto 8761 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth Pathways to Development: What We Know and Don’t Know http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth/pathways-development-what-we-know-and-don-t-know <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p class="rteleft"><img height="167" alt="" width="250" align="left" src="/files/growth/Pathways to Development.jpg" />Development is about welfare enhancing transformation through economic, social, political, and technological progress. Transformation is predicated on per capita income growth but development is also about progress in reduction of poverty and inequality, individual capabilities, access to social services, and quality of life. Both growth and development are also predicated on distributive politics of how a society is able to deal with vested interests and social conflicts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>During past sixty years, growth spurts have occurred in most countries but generally outcomes have fallen short of expectations. Developed economies have averaged growth rates of 2.4 percent during 1990 and 2008 while developing economies have collectively increased their GDP by an average of 4.7 percent over the same period. For low and middle income countries, physical capital is the</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 19 Aug 2010 00:29:50 +0000 Raj Nallari 8741 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/growth