SDGs http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/12492/all en #10 from 2017: Campaign Art: Food Waste http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/10-2017-campaign-art-food-waste-0 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <em>Our Top Ten blog posts by readership in 2017. </em><em>This post was <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-food-waste" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">originally published </a>on January 18, 2017.</em><em>  </em><br /><br /><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</strong><br />  <br /> According to the <a href="http://www.fao.org/home/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Food and Agriculture Organization</a> (FAO), annually around the world <a href="http://www.fao.org/save-food/resources/infographic/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">1.3 billion tons of food is lost or wasted.</a> In the world, where about one in nine people do not have enough food (<a href="https://www.wfp.org/hunger/stats" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">that’s some 795 million people</a>), food waste presents an enormous opportunity for tackling <a href="https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-nutrition-assistance/food-security-in-the-us/measurement/#security" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">food insecurity</a>.<br />  </div> <div> In order to bring more attention to the issue of food loss and waste and promote food loss reduction, FAO is leading the <a href="http://www.save-food.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Save Food</a> global initiative, partnering with the <a href="http://www.unep.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">United Nations Environment Programme</a> (UNEP), and others in the private sector and civil society.<br />  </div> <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-388 asset-video"> <strong > #NotWasting </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/68d-MpURBK8"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/68d-MpURBK8" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div> <p> Source: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 13 Dec 2017 17:11:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7769 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-321 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="180" /></a><strong>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br /><strong><a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/12/05/568288743/is-life-better-now-than-50-years-ago-the-answer-may-depend-on-the-economy?ft=nprml&amp;f" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Is Life Better Now Than 50 Years Ago? The Answer May Depend On The Economy</a></strong></p> <div> <strong>National Public Radio, USA</strong></div> <div> The way people perceive their country's economic conditions plays a big role in whether they view their lives more positively now compared with the past, according to a study released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. Of the nearly 43,000 people surveyed in 38 countries in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and North and South America, Vietnam had the most positive self-assessment: Eighty-eight percent of respondents said life is better today in their country than it was a half-century ago.</div> <div>  </div> <div> <strong><a href="https://theconversation.com/developing-countries-could-get-sick-before-they-get-rich-policy-can-help-87391" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Developing countries could get sick before they get rich. Policy can help</a></strong></div> <div> <strong>The Conversation</strong></div> <div> Improved human well-being is one of the modern era’s greatest triumphs. The age of plenty has also led to an unexpected global health crisis: two billion people are either overweight or obese. Developed countries have been especially susceptible to unhealthy weight gain, a trend that could be considered the price of abundance. However, developing countries are now facing a similar crisis.</div> <div>  </div> </div></div></div> Thu, 07 Dec 2017 18:07:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7768 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: What Does Freedom for Girls Mean to You? http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-what-does-freedom-girls-mean-you <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</strong><br /><br /> October 11 has been marked as the International Day of the Girl by the United Nations since 2012. The aims are to highlight and address the needs and challenges girls face, while promoting girls' empowerment and the fulfillment of their human rights.<br /><br /> For this year’s Day of the Girl, the #FreedomForGirls campaign was launched in partnership between <a href="https://www.project-everyone.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Project Everyone</a>, <a href="https://www.unicef.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">UNICEF</a>, and the <a href="https://www.gatesfoundation.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Bill &amp; Melinda Gates Foundation</a>. This campaign sheds further light on the <a href="http://www.globalgoals.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">United Nations’ Global Goals</a>, which included a commitment to achieve gender equality and empowering all women and girls by 2030. The UN along with its agencies and programs, believe that none of the 17 goals can be realized without empowering the largest generation of adolescent girls the world has ever seen.</p> <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-383 asset-video"> <strong > Freedom - International Day of the Girl </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/3BMgV8jj9IU"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/3BMgV8jj9IU" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div></div></div></div> Wed, 01 Nov 2017 18:10:00 +0000 Sari P.S Dallal 7757 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-317 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="180" /></a><strong>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br />   <div> <strong><a href="https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/capital-projects-and-infrastructure/our-insights/navigating-the-digital-future-the-disruption-of-capital-projects" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Navigating the digital future: The disruption of capital projects</a></strong></div> <div> <strong>McKinsey &amp; Company</strong></div> <div> Productivity in the construction sector has stagnated for decades, with the average capital project reaching completion 20 months behind schedule and 80 percent over budget. Some overruns result from increased project complexity and scale, but another factor also looms large: all stakeholders in the capital-projects ecosystem—project owners, contractors, and subcontractors—have resisted adopting digital tools and platforms. These include advanced analytics, automation, robotics, 5-D building information modeling (BIM), and online document-management or data-collection systems. Meanwhile, companies in sectors ranging from government to manufacturing have significantly reduced costs and schedules by aggressively pursuing digital solutions.</div> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/10/19/pollution-kills-9-million-people-each-year-new-study-finds/?utm_term=.f2fb1c1f027f" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Pollution kills 9 million people each year, new study finds</a><br /> Washington Post</strong><br /> Dirty air in India and China. Tainted water in sub-Saharan Africa. Toxic mining and smelter operations in South America. Pollution around the globe now contributes to an estimated 9 million deaths  annually — or roughly one in six — according to an in-depth new study published Thursday in the Lancet. If accurate, that means pollution kills three times more people each year than HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, with most of those deaths  in poor and developing countries.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 26 Oct 2017 18:21:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7755 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-316 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="180" /></a><strong>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21721656-data-economy-demands-new-approach-antitrust-rules-worlds-most-valuable-resource?fsrc=scn/tw/te/rfd/pe" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The world’s most valuable resource is no longer oil, but data</a></strong><br /><strong>The Economist</strong><br /> A NEW commodity spawns a lucrative, fast-growing industry, prompting antitrust regulators to step in to restrain those who control its flow. A century ago, the resource in question was oil. Now similar concerns are being raised by the giants that deal in data, the oil of the digital era. These titans—Alphabet (Google’s parent company), Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft—look unstoppable. They are the five most valuable listed firms in the world. Their profits are surging: they collectively racked up over $25bn in net profit in the first quarter of 2017. Amazon captures half of all dollars spent online in America. Google and Facebook accounted for almost all the revenue growth in digital advertising in America last year. Such dominance has prompted calls for the tech giants to be broken up, as Standard Oil was in the early 20th century. This newspaper has argued against such drastic action in the past. Size alone is not a crime.<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/28337" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Pathways for Peace : Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflicts</a></strong><br /><strong>World Bank/United Nations</strong><br /> The resurgence of violent conflict in recent years has caused immense human suffering, at enormous social and economic cost. Violent conflicts today have become complex and protracted, involving more non-state groups and regional and international actors, often linked to global challenges from climate change to transnational organized crime. It is increasingly recognized as an obstacle to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. This has given impetus for policy makers at all levels – from local to global – to focus on preventing violent conflict more effectively. Grounded in a shared commitment to this agenda, Pathways for Peace: Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict is a joint United Nations and World Bank study that looks at how development processes can better interact with diplomacy and mediation, security and other tools to prevent conflict from becoming violent.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 21 Sep 2017 14:55:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7752 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Competitive advantage in the knowledge economy http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/competitive-advantage-knowledge-economy <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt=" Chhor Sokunthea / World Bank" height="228" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/10476206023_aa5c221ee1_z.jpg" style="float:left" title=" Chhor Sokunthea / World Bank" width="320" />“Knowledge economy” is a term popularized by Peter Drucker in his book <em>The Age of Discontinuity</em>. Over the past decade, knowledge-based policies, projects and programs have increasingly become drivers of the knowledge economy. Intra and inter-institutional collaboration for sharing knowledge and experience are essential for tapping into the enormous powerhouse of indigenous, national, regional and global knowledge. The timely application of such shared knowledge can help in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.<br /><br /> At the beginning of this summer, 60 task team leaders and investment officers from the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation, regional development banks – African Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, and Inter-American Development Bank – and Rome-based UN Agencies – Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Fund For Agricultural Development (IFAD) and World Food Program (WFP)– participated in a 3-day Knowledge Forum organized by the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program (GAFSP). The Forum was hosted by the FAO at its Headquarters in Rome. This was the third Knowledge Forum organized by GAFSP, <a href="https://video214.com/play/kP3x3FHzzAb8k8rYy70KJg/s/dark" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">a video </a>was developed on the GAFSP 2017 Knowledge Forum.<br /><br /> The 2017 Knowledge Forum, one of GAFSP’s flagship events, brought together strategic and operational insights drawn from the Program’s Public and Private Sector Window projects. The Forum provided a robust and interactive platform to share tacit knowledge and experiences, including ways to improve efficiency and effectiveness of project delivery and increase impact on rural poor; to implement GAFSP’s new Monitoring and Evaluation Plan including Food Insecurity Experience Scale (FIES); and to implement the newly-designed GAFSP’s Operations Portal. The importance and benefits of partnering with civil society organizations like ActionAid, ROPPA (<a href="http://www.roppa-afrique.org/" target="_blank" title="external-link-new-window" rel="nofollow">Réseau des Organisations Paysannes et de Producteurs de l"Afrique de l'Ouest) in Africa, </a>and AFA (Asian Farmers Association) in Asia, in the design and implementation of GAFSP-supported projects were highlighted in the Forum.</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 29 Aug 2017 19:57:00 +0000 Iftikhar Mostafa 7747 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-313 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="180" /></a><strong>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br /><strong><a href="http://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/TheSustainableDevelopmentGoalsReport2017.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Sustainable Development Goals Report 2017</a></strong><br /><strong>United Nations</strong><br /> The Sustainable Development Goals Report 2017 reviews progress made towards the 17 Goals in the second year of implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The report is based on the latest available data. It highlights both gains and challenges as the international community moves towards full realization of the ambitions and principles espoused in the 2030 Agenda. While considerable progress has been made over the past decade across all areas of development, the pace of progress observed in previous years is insufficient to fully meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and targets by 2030. Time is therefore of the essence. Moreover, as the following pages show, progress has not always been equitable. Advancements have been uneven across regions, between the sexes, and among people of different ages, wealth and locales, including urban and rural dwellers. Faster and more inclusive progress is needed to accomplish the bold vision articulated in the 2030 Agenda. <br /><br /><strong><a href="https://home.kpmg.com/xx/en/home/insights/2017/07/2017-change-readiness-index.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">2017 Change Readiness Index</a></strong><br /><strong>KPMG</strong><br /> The 2017 Change Readiness Index (CRI) indicates the capability of a country – its government, private and public enterprises, people and wider civil society – to anticipate, prepare for, manage, and respond to a wide range of change drivers, proactively cultivating the resulting opportunities and mitigating potential negative impacts. Examples of change include:</p> <p> • shocks such as financial and social instability and natural disasters<br /> • political and economic opportunities and risks such as technology, competition, and changes in government.</p> <p> Since 2012, the CRI has evolved to become a key tool that provides reliable, independent, and robust information to support the work of governments, civil society institutions, businesses, and the international development community.<br /><br /></div></div></div> Thu, 20 Jul 2017 18:19:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7745 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: #LetsTalk http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-letstalk <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong><span>People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</span></strong><br /><br /><a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_7.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="320" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_7.jpg" style="float:left" title="by WHO " width="221" /></a>According to the <a href="http://www.who.int/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Health Organization</a> (WHO), globally more than <a href="http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs369/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">300 million people suffer from depression</a>. However, less than half of these affected seek and get help. In addition to stigma surrounding depression, one of the biggest barriers why people are unable to seek and get help is the lack of government spending worldwide for mental health services. <a href="http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2016/depression-anxiety-treatment/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">“According to WHO’s “Mental Health Atlas 2014” survey, governments spend on average 3% of their health budgets on mental health, ranging from less than 1% in low-income countries to 5% in high-income countries.”</a>  <br /><br /> Mental health needs to be at the forefront of the humanitarian and development agenda, in order to achieve the set <a href="https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Sustainable Development Goals</a> (SDGs). Governments around the world must scale up their investment in mental health services, as the current commitments are inadequate. The study published by <strong>“The Lancet Psychiatry</strong>” calls for greater investment in mental health services. <a href="http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2016/depression-anxiety-treatment/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">“We know that treatment of depression and anxiety makes good sense for health and wellbeing; this new study confirms that it makes sound economic sense too,” said Dr Margaret Chan, Director-General of WHO. “We must now find ways to make sure that access to mental health services becomes a reality for all men, women and children, wherever they live.”</a></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 29 Mar 2017 15:08:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7675 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-271 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <h4> <img alt="World of News" height="179" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title=" Flickr user fdecomit" width="180" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</h4> <div> <strong><a href="http://www.worldbank.org/en/research/publication/making-politics-work-for-development" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Making Politics Work for Development: Harnessing Transparency and Citizen Engagement</a></strong></div> <div> <strong>World Bank Group</strong></div> <div> Too often, government leaders fail to adopt and implement policies that they know are necessary for sustained economic development. Political constraints can prevent leaders from following sound technical advice, even when leaders have the best of intentions. Making Politics Work for Development: Harnessing Transparency and Citizen Engagement focuses on two forces—citizen engagement and transparency—that hold the key to solving government failures by shaping how political markets function.</div> <div>  </div> <div> <strong><a href="https://www.devex.com/news/governing-the-world-as-if-it-counts-88437" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Governing the world 'as if' it counts</a></strong></div> <div> <strong>Devex</strong></div> <div> The most challenging notion to take on board in the governance of today’s world is that not all that counts can be counted. We increasingly rely on numbers as shortcuts to information about the world that we do not have time to digest. The name of the game is governance “as if” the world counts. It might be a smart shortcut sometimes, but we are in deep trouble if we forget that we are doing it “as if” the world counts. Leadership should take making good decisions seriously. If the method by which we get knowledge and the method by which we make decisions is limited to what can be numbered, we are setting up a system of governance that’s systematically getting stuff that actually counts wrong.<br />  </div> <div> </div></div></div> Thu, 28 Jul 2016 14:06:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7472 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-269 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <h4> <img alt="World of News" height="179" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title=" Flickr user fdecomit" width="180" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span></h4> <p> <br /><strong><a href="http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/07/06/the-imf-confronts-its-n-word-neoliberalism/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The IMF Confronts Its N-Word</a><br /> Foreign Policy</strong><br /> The research department of the International Monetary Fund dropped a political bombshell last month. The furor was set off by the publication of an article — “Neoliberalism: Oversold?” — that sparked a near-panic among advocates of free market policies and celebrations among their critics. The piece concluded that, over the past 30 years, the proponents of the economic philosophy known as “neoliberalism” have been systematically overselling the benefits of the two planks at its heart — namely, fiscal austerity during economic slowdowns and the deregulation of financial markets.<br /><br /><strong><a href="http://devpolicy.org/bridging-data-gaps-policymaking-crowdsourcing-big-data-development-20160708/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Bridging data gaps for policymaking: crowdsourcing and big data for development</a><br /> DevPolicy Blog</strong><br /> Good data to inform policymaking, particularly in developing countries, is often scarce. The problem is in part due to supply issues – high costs, insufficient time, and low capacity – but also due to lack of demand: policies are rarely shown to be abject failures when there is no data to evaluate them. The wonderful phrase “policy-based evidence making” (the converse of “evidenced-based policy making”) comes to mind when thinking about the latter. However, technological innovations are helping to bridge some of the data gaps. What are the innovations in data collection and what are the trade-offs being made when using them to inform policy?</p> <p> </div></div></div> Thu, 14 Jul 2016 14:35:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7459 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: Spice Girls meet SDGs http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-spice-girls-meet-sdgs <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</strong><br /><br /> A video went viral yesterday. You may have seen it. It is a remake of the famous 90’s girl-power song “Wannabe” by the Spice Girls. In the video, girls and women from different places of the world sing to the famous tune while showing signs and posters of what they “<em>really really want</em>” for girls.<br /><br /> This campaign has been put together by <a href="http://www.globalgoals.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Global Goals</a>, an initiative that is working to raise awareness, popular support and global action for the <a href="http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Sustainable Development Goals</a> (SDGs). The 17 SDGs were adopted by the United Nations in 2015, and each of the goals contain specific global targets to be achieved by 2030. <a href="http://www.globalgoals.org/global-goals/gender-equality/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Goal #5</a> is for gender equality and empowerment of all women and girls.<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-276 asset-video"> <strong > #WhatIReallyReallyWant </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/sZQ2RUFd54o"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/sZQ2RUFd54o" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div> <div> Source of video: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRfuAYy7MesZmgOi1Ezy0ng" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Global Goals</a><br /></div></div></div> Wed, 06 Jul 2016 15:04:00 +0000 Davinia Levy 7451 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Four ways regional bodies can help deliver justice commitments made through the SDGs http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/four-ways-regional-bodies-can-help-deliver-justice-commitments-made-through-sdgs <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="188" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2117803811_cb443a77de_z.jpg" style="float:left" title=" © Curt Carnemark / World Bank" width="280" />The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) differ from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in many ways. Unlike the MDGs, the SDGs universally apply to all countries and they are holistic and integrated. Moreover, their delivery is to be achieved by governments, civil society, and the private sector all working together to achieve their success.<br />  <br /> The SDGs also recognize the central role of justice in achieving development, with Goal 16 specifically guaranteeing “equal access to justice for all.” Governments, in partnership with other stakeholders, must make necessary national reforms to provide access to justice to the billions who currently live outside of the protection of the law. They must commit to financing the implementation of these reforms and be held accountable for their success.<br />  <br /> Regional and sub regional bodies are uniquely placed to assist governments with implementing and monitoring justice commitments made through the SDGs. <a href="http://kroc.nd.edu/sites/default/files/Kroc%20Policy%20Brief%20RIGOs%20and%20Post-2015%20Dev%20Agenda.pdf" rel="nofollow">L</a><a href="http://kroc.nd.edu/sites/default/files/Kroc%20Policy%20Brief%20RIGOs%20and%20Post-2015%20Dev%20Agenda.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">earnings</a> from the MDGs show that countries that integrated the MDGs into existing regional strategies were far more successful in meeting the MDGs’ objectives than countries that did not have the support of an existing regional strategy.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 16 Jun 2016 16:20:00 +0000 Temitayo O. Peters 7432 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-260 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <h4> <img alt="World of News" height="179" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title=" Flickr user fdecomit" width="180" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</h4> <p> <strong><a href="http://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/world/corruption-the-developing-world-has-bigger-problems-brazil" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Corruption? The developing world has bigger problems</a></strong><br /> Prospect<br /> Few challenges in international development ignite as much passion as corruption. Perhaps ironically given the recent Panama Papers scandal, the UK government has encouraged the “zero tolerance” approach to corruption in international development. This approach may be the ideal, but an effective strategy for tackling corruption must acknowledge that it is a social and political problem, rather than purely a moral one.  In March, we contributed to the UK parliament’s International Development Committee inquiry on tackling corruption overseas. In our evidence, we argued that corruption in the developing world is not the worst of all evils—and that it cannot be wiped out without collateral damage.</p> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.odi.org/publications/10381-time-let-go-remaking-humanitarian-action-modern-era" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Time to let go: remaking humanitarian action for the modern era</a></strong><br /> ODI<br /> The humanitarian sector is suffering a crisis of legitimacy. Despite a decade of system-wide reforms, the sector is failing to adapt to meet the needs of people in crises. As humanitarian emergencies become more frequent, more complex and last longer, the need for radical change is ever growing. Drawing on four years of research, this report argues that the humanitarian system needs to let go of some fundamental – but outdated – assumptions, structures and behaviours to respond effectively to modern day crises. It argues for a new model of humanitarian action, one that requires letting go of the current paradigm.<br />  </div></div></div> Thu, 12 May 2016 14:10:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7398 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Tackling inequality is a game changer for business and private sector development (which is why most of them are ignoring it) http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/tackling-inequality-game-changer-business-and-private-sector-development-which-why-most-them-are <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><img alt="" height="150" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/erinchsahan-150x150.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="150" />Oxfam’s private sector adviser <a href="http://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/our-people/advocacy/erinch-sahan" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Erinch Sahan</a> is thinking through the implications of inequality for the businesses he interacts with.</em></p> <p> Mention inequality to a business audience and one of two things happens. They recoil in discomfort, or reinterpret the term – as social sustainability or doing more business with people living in poverty. Same goes for the private sector development professionals in the aid community (e.g. the inclusive business crowd).</p> <p> A good example is the UN Global Compact, which <a href="https://www.unglobalcompact.org/what-is-gc/our-work/sustainable-development/17-global-goals" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">steers companies on how to implement the SDGs</a>. They completely side-step the difficult implications of inequality on business and redefine the inequality SDG as boiling down to <a href="https://www.unglobalcompact.org/what-is-gc/our-work/social" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">social sustainability</a> or <a href="https://www.unglobalcompact.org/take-action/action/womens-principles" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">human rights</a> / <a href="https://www.unglobalcompact.org/take-action/action/womens-principles" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">women’s empowerment goal</a>. All good things that we at Oxfam also fight for, but these can all happen simultaneously with increasing concentration of income and wealth amongst the richest – i.e. rising inequalityWe know that rising inequality is one of the great threats to our society and economy. So why is business and the aid world so uncomfortable with tackling it head on?</p> <p> <img alt="Man picks tea leaves at Kitabi Tea Processing Facility" height="187" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/17405711385_51099f6c95_z.jpg" style="float:right" title=" A'Melody Lee / World Bank" width="280" />Inequality is a relative rather than an absolute measure. This often makes it a zero-sum game – to spread wealth and income more equally, someone probably has to lose. But the intersection of business, sustainability and development has become locked into an exclusive focus on win-win approaches where there are no trade-offs and everyone gets their cake and eats it too. Addressing inequality often hits the bottom line – meaning changes to the prices paid to farmers, wages paid to workers, taxes paid to government and prices charged to consumers. But there is hope. Through a new lens (or metric) that should drive how business addresses inequality: share of value.</p> <p> Don’t confuse this with <a href="https://hbr.org/2011/01/the-big-idea-creating-shared-value" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Creating Shared Value</a>, which is focused on the win-win (without commenting on how the created value is shared). What I’m proposing is a measure that compares businesses on how they share value with workers, farmers and low-income consumers. In fact the concept dates back to the original principles underpinning the fair trade movement some decades ago.</p> </div></div></div> Mon, 18 Apr 2016 16:45:00 +0000 Duncan Green 7369 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-253 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img alt="World of News" height="179" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="180" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span><br />   <p> <strong><a href="http://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2016/mar/13/do-international-ngos-still-have-the-right-to-exist" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Do international NGOs still have the right to exist?</a></strong><br /> The Guardian<br /> It’s highly unlikely that corporate bosses regularly ask themselves if their businesses have a right to exist. Their goal is to sell stuff and make a profit. But if your goal is to alleviate poverty and human suffering – in the face of statistics showing mixed outcomes – is this, in fact, the most important question an International NGO can ask of themselves? At the BOND conference last week, in a session entitled How can INGOs survive the future, Penny Lawrence, the deputy CEO of Oxfam stated bluntly: “we need to earn the right to survive the future.” It is like the sector’s very own Damascene moment.</p> <p> <strong><a href="http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/future-development/posts/2016/03/10-how-to-change-the-world-kharas?rssid=Future+Development" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Changing views of how to change the world</a></strong><br /> Brookings, Future Development blog<br /> World leaders concluded three large agreements last year. Each represents a vision of how to change the world. The <a href="http://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/AAAA_Outcome.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Addis Ababa Action Agenda</a> on financing for development agreed to move from “billions to trillions” of cross-border flows to developing countries. <a href="https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The agreement on universal sustainable development goals</a> (SDGs) sets out priorities (albeit a long list) for what needs to change. <a href="http://ec.europa.eu/clima/policies/strategies/2050/index_en.htm" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Paris Agreement on climate change</a> endorses a shift to low-carbon (and ultimately zero carbon) economic growth trajectories. There is a common thread to these agreements. They each reflect a new theory of how to change the world that is not made explicit but has evolved as a matter of practice. Understanding this new theory is crucial to successful implementation strategies of the three agreements.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 24 Mar 2016 14:03:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7348 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere