Female Empowerment http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/6130/all en Campaign Art: What Does Freedom for Girls Mean to You? http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-what-does-freedom-girls-mean-you <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</strong><br /><br /> October 11 has been marked as the International Day of the Girl by the United Nations since 2012. The aims are to highlight and address the needs and challenges girls face, while promoting girls' empowerment and the fulfillment of their human rights.<br /><br /> For this year’s Day of the Girl, the #FreedomForGirls campaign was launched in partnership between <a href="https://www.project-everyone.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Project Everyone</a>, <a href="https://www.unicef.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">UNICEF</a>, and the <a href="https://www.gatesfoundation.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Bill &amp; Melinda Gates Foundation</a>. This campaign sheds further light on the <a href="http://www.globalgoals.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">United Nations’ Global Goals</a>, which included a commitment to achieve gender equality and empowering all women and girls by 2030. The UN along with its agencies and programs, believe that none of the 17 goals can be realized without empowering the largest generation of adolescent girls the world has ever seen.</p> <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-383 asset-video"> <strong > Freedom - International Day of the Girl </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/3BMgV8jj9IU"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/3BMgV8jj9IU" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div></div></div></div> Wed, 01 Nov 2017 18:10:00 +0000 Sari P.S Dallal 7757 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Cycologic: The power of women for the power of bicycles in Uganda http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/cycologic-power-women-power-bicycles-uganda <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><figure class="image" style="float:right"><img alt="" height="176" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/amanda_kampala.jpg" title="Amanda Ngabirano bicycling in Kampala" width="320" /><figcaption> Amanda Ngabirano riding a bicycle in Kampala</figcaption></figure><p> <em>“She who succeeds in gaining the mastery of the bicycle will gain the mastery of life.” </em><strong>- Susan B. Anthony</strong><br />  <br /> In America during the 1890s, the bicycle provided women with unprecedented autonomy of mobility and abolished many old fashions, including corsets, bustles, and long voluminous skirts. Bicycles came to epitomize the quintessential “new woman” of the late 19<sup>th</sup> Century. She was believed to be college educated, active in sports, interested in pursuing a career, and looking for a marriage based on equality. The image of the “new women” was also almost always portrayed on a <strong>bicycle</strong>! An 1895 article found in the <em>American Wheelman,</em> mentions suffragist leader, Elizabeth Cady Stanton who predicted: <em>“The bicycle will inspire women with more courage, self-respect, self-reliance….”</em><br />  <br /> At a conference I attended on cycling, the coffee break chatter included this intriguing question: <em>“What can be more picturesque than a woman on the bicycle?”</em> After a few moments of loud deliberations none of the cycling scholars were able to come up with a clever enough answer, but the expected answer was very obvious: <em>“TWO women riding bicycles!”</em> What a perfect match for the testimony of women’s rights activist, Susan B. Anthony, who stated: <em>“Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I think it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives women a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel… the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood.” </em><br />  <br /> It’s amazing to witness people from different walks of life; different countries or differing religions work together for the social good. Such is the compelling story about five women who indirectly and directly empower each other to advocate for the usage of the bicycle as a means of transport in Uganda’s Capital, Kampala. When the London based staff writer, Maeve Shearlaw of The Guardian, wrote an article in August 2015 titled, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/aug/21/kampala-uganda-cycling-bike-friendly-city" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">"Potholes, sewage and traffic hostility: can Kampala ever be a bike-friendly city?"</a>, she was most likely not anticipating that a year later her story would inspire three female students from Sweden’s <a href="https://rodakorsetsfolkhogskola.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Red Cross College University in Stockholm</a>. The three were taking a course called: <em>Documentary in the World</em>, as a part of a one-year program focused on global social issues.</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 19 Oct 2016 18:00:00 +0000 Leszek J. Sibilski 7540 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-234 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="World of News" height="139" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</p> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/2015-10-12/worth-every-cent" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Worth Every Cent</a></strong><br /> Foreign Affairs<br /> In a Foreign Affairs article last year, we wrote what we hoped would be a provocative argument: “Cash grants to the poor are as good as or better than many traditional forms of aid when it comes to reducing poverty.” Cash grants are cheaper to administer and effective at giving recipients what they want, rather than what experts think they need. That argument seems less radical by the day. Experimental impact evaluations continue to show strong results for cash grants large or small. In August, David McKenzie of the World Bank reported results from a study of grants of $50,000 on average to entrepreneurs in Nigeria that showed large positive impacts on business creation, survival, profits, sales, and employment, including an increase of more than 20 percent in the likelihood of a firm having more than ten employees.</p> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.bond.org.uk/news/2015/10/no-deatons-nobel-prize-win-isnt-victory-aid-sceptics" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">No, Deaton’s Nobel prize win isn’t a victory for aid sceptics</a></strong><br /> Bond<br /> A lot of fuss has been made this week about the latest winner of the Nobel prize in economics, British-born economist Angus Deaton, and his apparent aversion to foreign aid. Predictably, much of the press has taken his victory as a vindication of their suspicions on aid. It’s worth getting a few things straight though. Deaton did not win the Nobel prize for his criticism of aid. He was awarded the prize for his analysis of inequality and creation of better tools with which to analyse living standards amongst the poorest people in the world. Deaton is, in fact, more of a critic than an opponent of aid. In the same way that a film critic doesn’t hate all films (although it sometimes seems they do), Deaton doesn’t hate all aid.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 22 Oct 2015 14:14:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7196 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-229 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img alt="World of News" height="139" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="140" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span><br />   <p> <a href="http://www.nationmultimedia.com/opinion/A-simple-solution-for-better-economic-performance--30268332.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>A simple solution for better economic performance - empower women</strong></a><br /> The Nation<br /> Christine Lagarde, the managing director of the International Monetary Fund and one of the world's most influential women, made an interesting remark last weekend.  "We have estimates that, if the number of female workers were to increase to the same level as the number of men, GDP in the United States would expand by 5 per cent, by 9 per cent in Japan, and by 27 per cent in India," she told the inaugural summit of the Women's 20 (W-20), a new grouping launched by the G20, in Turkey.  She said that aside from boosting gross domestic product, getting more women into secure and well-paid jobs raises overall per-capita income.<br /><br /><strong><a href="http://www.dw.com/en/dealing-with-digital-in-media-development-7-things-to-consider/a-18692074?utm_source=Copy+of+DMM+09%2F04%2F2015&amp;utm_campaign=DMM+9-5&amp;utm_medium=email" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Dealing with digital in media development —7 things to consider</a></strong><br /> Deutsche Welle Akademie<br /> When colleagues from DW Akademie asked me to contribute some reflections on media development, I found myself in the difficult position of having to find a common ground for the term. Between regular Facebook updates sent by a friend working with a local radio station in Southern Sudan, a conversation I had here in Malmö/Sweden with a recently arrived Syrian refugee who used to work for state television, or the daily discussions about media, globalization and development that we have in our academic environment, it is difficult to find common ground.   But then again, when all these impressions and reflections sink in, some broader issues emerge. I have summarized them under the following seven points:<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 17 Sep 2015 14:12:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7163 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: Raising Her Voice http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-raising-her-voice <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.<br /><br /> Only <a href="http://www.unwomen.org/en/what-we-do/leadership-and-political-participation/facts-and-figures" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">1 in 5 parliamentarians worldwide are female</a>, and even fewer serve as Head of State or Head of Government.<br /><br /> In formulating and implementing government policy and development projects, the lack of female voices in decision-making processes can have unfortunate consequences. For example, an estimated <a href="http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs351/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">222 million women in the developing world would like to delay or prevent pregnancies </a>but do not use contraception, resulting in 20 million unsafe abortions and 30million unplanned pregnancies.<br />   <p> <a href="http://www.oxfam.org.uk/raisinghervoice" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Raising Her Voice</a>, Oxfam's global programme to support female political participation and leadership through collective activism, has empowered women worldwide, creating avenues  to make their voices heard.  This ensures that political processes are accountable to them and that policies reflect their needs.<strong>  </strong><br /><br /> The following video commissioned by <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Oxfam International </a>illustrates why it's important for women to be a part of decision making, but also that it is possible.</p> <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-83 asset-video"> <strong > Raising Her Voice </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe width="640" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wuDQIjGRCfg?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-desc field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"></div></div></div></div> </div> <p> </div></div></div> Wed, 25 Jun 2014 16:19:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6738 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Understanding the Nature of Power: The Force Field that Shapes Development http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/understanding-nature-power-force-field-shapes-development <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/4417086779_8499967d8c_o_0.jpg" style="float:left; height:187px; margin-left:4px; margin-right:4px; width:280px" />I wrote this post for ODI’s <a href="http://www.developmentprogress.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Development Progress</a> blog. It went up last week, closing <a href="http://www.developmentprogress.org/political-voice" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">a series of posts on the theme of Political Voice</a>.</em></p> <p> Women’s empowerment is one of the greatest areas of progress in the last century, so what better theme for a post on ‘voice’ than gender rights?</p> <p> Globally, the gradual empowerment of women is one of the standout features of the past century. The transformation in terms of access to justice and education, to literacy, sexual and reproductive rights and political representation is striking.</p> <p> That progress has been driven by a combination of factors: the spread of effective states that are able to turn ‘rights thinking’ into actual practice, and broader normative shifts; new technologies that have freed up women’s time and enabled them to control their own fertility; the vast expansion of primary education – particularly for girls – and improved health facilities.</p> <p> Politics and power have been central to many, if not all, of these advances. At a global political level, the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (<a href="http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/cedaw/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">CEDAW</a>) appears to be one of those pieces of international law that exerts genuine traction at a national level, as it is ratified and codified in domestic legislation.</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 29 Apr 2014 16:15:00 +0000 Duncan Green 6684 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #7 from 2013: A New Kind of Female Superhero: Burka Avenger http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/7-2013-new-kind-female-superhero-burka-avenger <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/burka_wide-ac6a824f463e1a261feeecf3840afc3716b5712f-s6-c30.jpeg" style="float:left; height:191px; width:340px" /><em><strong>Our Top Ten Blog Posts by readership in 2013</strong><br /> This post was originally published on August 29, 2013</em><br /><br /> Have you heard of a new superheroine called “<a href="http://www.burkaavenger.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Burka Avenger</a>”?  Burka Avenger is a new animated series for kids in Pakistan. Burka Avenger fights corrupt politicians and Taliban-look-a-like thugs who try to shut down a girl’s school in a village. She is fully trained in martial arts and uses pens and books to fight the bad guys. During the day, her alter-ego Jiya is a teacher at an all-girls school. All in all, she represents a female vanguard of girl’s education. So why would there be any criticisms coming from certain feminists circles in Pakistan?  <em>Her burka.</em><br />  <br /> To hide her identity, she wears a flowing black burka to fight the bad guys. Those who have issues with it say Burka is a sign of oppression and cannot be used to empower women. Some also say that it sends a wrong message by implying a woman can only be successful if she is invisible.</p> </div></div></div> Mon, 30 Dec 2013 17:19:00 +0000 Shamiela Mir 6454 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere