conflict http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/649/all en Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-316 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_8.jpg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="180" /></a><strong>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21721656-data-economy-demands-new-approach-antitrust-rules-worlds-most-valuable-resource?fsrc=scn/tw/te/rfd/pe" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The world’s most valuable resource is no longer oil, but data</a></strong><br /><strong>The Economist</strong><br /> A NEW commodity spawns a lucrative, fast-growing industry, prompting antitrust regulators to step in to restrain those who control its flow. A century ago, the resource in question was oil. Now similar concerns are being raised by the giants that deal in data, the oil of the digital era. These titans—Alphabet (Google’s parent company), Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft—look unstoppable. They are the five most valuable listed firms in the world. Their profits are surging: they collectively racked up over $25bn in net profit in the first quarter of 2017. Amazon captures half of all dollars spent online in America. Google and Facebook accounted for almost all the revenue growth in digital advertising in America last year. Such dominance has prompted calls for the tech giants to be broken up, as Standard Oil was in the early 20th century. This newspaper has argued against such drastic action in the past. Size alone is not a crime.<br />  <br /><strong><a href="https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/28337" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Pathways for Peace : Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflicts</a></strong><br /><strong>World Bank/United Nations</strong><br /> The resurgence of violent conflict in recent years has caused immense human suffering, at enormous social and economic cost. Violent conflicts today have become complex and protracted, involving more non-state groups and regional and international actors, often linked to global challenges from climate change to transnational organized crime. It is increasingly recognized as an obstacle to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. This has given impetus for policy makers at all levels – from local to global – to focus on preventing violent conflict more effectively. Grounded in a shared commitment to this agenda, Pathways for Peace: Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict is a joint United Nations and World Bank study that looks at how development processes can better interact with diplomacy and mediation, security and other tools to prevent conflict from becoming violent.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 21 Sep 2017 14:55:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7752 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-307 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong><a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2183144613_51456feb78_z_1_14.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2183144613_51456feb78_z_1_14.jpg" style="float:right" title="" width="180" /></a>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br /><strong><a href="https://rsf.org/en/ranking" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The World Press Freedom Index</a></strong><br /><strong>Reporters Without Borders</strong><br /> The 2017 World Press Freedom Index compiled by Reporters Without Borders (RSF) shows an increase in the number of countries where the media freedom situation is very grave and highlights the scale and variety of the obstacles to media freedom throughout the world.</p> <p> <strong><a href="http://www.gsma.com/mobileeconomy/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Mobile Economy 2017</a></strong><br /><strong>GSMA</strong><br /> The GSMA Mobile Economy series provides the latest insights on the state of the mobile industry worldwide. Produced by our renowned in-house research team, GSMA Intelligence, these reports contain a range of technology, socio-economic and financial datasets, including forecasts out to 2020.</p> <p> <strong><a href="https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/26306" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2017 : From World Development Indicators</a></strong><br /><strong>World Bank</strong><br /> T<span>he Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2017 uses maps, charts and analysis to illustrate, trends, challenges and measurement issues related to each of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The Atlas primarily draws on World Development Indicators (WDI) - the World Bank's compilation of internationally comparable statistics about global development and the quality of people's lives Given the breadth and scope of the SDGs, the editors have been selective, emphasizing issues considered important by experts in the World Bank's Global Practices and Cross Cutting Solution Areas. Nevertheless, The Atlas aims to reflect the breadth of the Goals themselves and presents national and regional trends and snapshots of progress towards the UN's seventeen Sustainable Development Goals: poverty, hunger, health, education, gender, water, energy, jobs, infrastructure, inequalities, cities, consumption, climate, oceans, the environment, peace, institutions, and partnerships.  </span><br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 04 May 2017 14:19:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7710 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Immigration and displacement: The importance of social networks for those leaving home http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/immigration-and-displacement-importance-social-networks-those-leaving-home <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong>This is the third post in a series of six in which </strong><a href="http://www.worldbank.org/en/about/people/michael-woolcock" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong><em>Michael Woolcock</em></strong></a><strong>, Lead Social Development Specialist at the World Bank and lecturer in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, discusses critical ideas within the field of </strong><a href="http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/socialdevelopment" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong><em>Social Development</em></strong></a><strong>.</strong><br /><br /> International migration trends have been the subject of fierce debate globally, and when you look at the data it’s no surprise why this is the case.  In 2015, the number of international migrants was the highest ever recorded, reaching 244 million (from 232 million in 2013), according to the <a href="http://gmdac.iom.int/global-migration-trends-factsheet" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">International Organization for Migration</a>.  Moreover, the number of people fleeing conflict has also risen. <a href="http://www.unhcr.org/en-us/figures-at-a-glance.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">UNHCR</a>, the UN’s Refugee Agency, estimates that 65.3 million people have been forcibly displaced from their homes, 21.3 million of which are now refugees, and around 10 million people are stateless.<br /><br /> These massive flows of people, however, demonstrate the incredible capacity of social networks to help individuals navigate and deal with new experiences. For most migrants the choice to move is an existential one in which they <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/geography/migration/migration_trends_rev2.shtml" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">weigh</a> the risk it takes to make the journey with the potential opportunities it may bring.  In doing so they consider where and how people they know have traveled before them, and which <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/ubuntu-how-social-networks-help-explain-theories-change" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">relationships they can tap into for support</a>. Individuals living in diasporas also respond by sharing <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2015/10/apps-refugee-crisis-coding/413377/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">critical knowledge and tools</a>, sending <a href="http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/migrationremittancesdiasporaissues/overview" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">remittances</a>, and in bridging the cultures between the newly arrived and their new communities.</p> <p> As Michael Woolcock explains, the risk involved with migrating is directly affected by the social networks that individuals can construct to cope with the hazards and vulnerability that they encounter- both in the process of moving but also in settling and figuring out how things are done in the new locale.<br />  </p> <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-362 asset-video"> <strong > Immigration and displacement: The importance of social networks for those leaving home </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/49gLKkTKDwI"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/49gLKkTKDwI" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div> <p> </div></div></div> Tue, 18 Apr 2017 17:08:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7694 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The Smuggling Game: Playing with life and death to reach Europe http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/smuggling-game-playing-life-and-death-reach-europe <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <div> <strong>Millions of people fleeing conflict and poverty are gambling their futures and life savings with people smugglers – strangers who play with their lives in dangerous cat-and-mouse chases with border authorities known as “The Game”.<br /><br /> But who wins and who loses as rising numbers risk everything to reach safety?</strong><br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-354 asset-video"> <strong > Getting to Europe: the game </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/204931295" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe></div></div></div></div> </div><br /><strong>No Turning Back</strong></div> <div> <img alt="Aras Mahmoud, his wife, mother and children in their bedroom&amp;amp;nbsp;in a refugee centre in Krnjaca, Belgrade.&amp;amp;nbsp;" height="242" src="http://news.trust.org/application/assets/shorthand/the-smuggling-game/media/fz2a2719_b7qwoi0-mr_qcg2pwv.jpg" style="float:left" title="By Thomson Reuters Foundation " width="363" />In the dead of night, as wild animals howled nearby, Syrian migrant Aras Mahmoud clung to his children as they slept on damp grass in the Bulgarian mountains en route to Serbia, praying that his family would live another day.</div> </div> <div> <div> <div> <div> <p> "In those mountains, you are not sure if something will eat you or attack you," said Mahmoud, 38, in Arabic through an interpreter at a migrant centre in the Serbian capital Belgrade.</p> <p> "My two children got very scared. They used to tell me, 'No father, we don't want to go with smugglers, we don't want to go to the forest.' We suffered in the mountains."</p> </div> <div> <div> <div> <p> Scared and helpless, in those dark moments Mahmoud said he wrestled with his decision four years ago to gamble everything - his money and the lives of his wife and children - to pay nameless strangers to smuggle them to safety, becoming another pawn in the global people trade widely known as "The Game".</p> </div> </div> </div> <div> <p> "If you go, you succeed. If you don't go, you lose. That's why they call it a game," said 20-year-old Afghan migrant Ahmad Shakib who made it to Serbia from Bulgaria after three 'games'.</div></div></div> Tue, 04 Apr 2017 15:30:00 +0000 Lin Taylor 7681 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere It's a bird...It's a plane...It's an edible aid drone! http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/its-birdits-planeits-edible-aid-drone <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Also available in: <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/voices/fr/est-ce-un-oiseau-un-avion-non-c-est-un-drone-humanitaire-comestible" rel="nofollow">Français</a> <div> <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/untitled_5.png" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="322" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/untitled_5.png" style="float:left" title="By Windhorse Aerospace" width="476" /></a></div> <p> Edible drones filled with food, water or medicine could soon become indispensable in humanitarian emergencies by delivering live-saving supplies to remote areas hit by natural disasters or conflict, their designers said on Monday.</p> <p> With 50 kg (110 lb) of food stocked inside its compartments, each drone costing 150 pounds ($187) would be able to deliver enough supplies to feed up to 50 people per day, they said.</p> <p> The frame of the prototype version of the drone - called Pouncer - is made of wood but the designers are planning to use edible materials in the next version.</p> <p> "Food can be component to build things," Nigel Gifford, an ex-army catering officer and founder of UK-based Windhorse Aerospace, the company behind the design, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.</p> <p> "You fly (the drone) and then eat it," he said in a phone interview.</p> <p> With up to 40 km (25 miles) reach, the drone can be launched from an aircraft or catapulted from the ground with an accuracy of about 7 metres (23 ft), giving it an advantage over air drops - often used as a last resort in emergencies.</p> <p> "In combat zones like we have in Aleppo or Mosul nothing will work except what we have," Gifford said.</p> <p> "With parachuted air drops the problem is you can't guarantee where the loads will land.</p> <p> "In Aleppo we could have put aid straight into some of the streets and we could have done that out of the sight of ISIS (Islamic State)."<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Tue, 14 Mar 2017 13:30:00 +0000 Magdalena Mis 7658 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-296 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong><a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2_1.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2_1.jpg" style="float:right" title="" width="180" /></a>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br /><strong><a href="https://www.csis.org/analysis/recurring-storms" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Recurring Storms: Food Insecurity, Political Instability, and Conflict</a><br /> Center for Strategic and International Studies</strong><br /> Renewed and expanded international collaboration to anticipate and prepare for recurring storms of food insecurity is essential. Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Syria are examples that vividly underscore the explosiveness of situations in which people find themselves unable to get the food they want and need. The experiences of post-conflict countries highlight some critical issues that need to be prioritized in order to regain sustainable food security. Averting future storms will require the recognition that food security challenges will extend long beyond 2030, political leadership must be visibly committed to these issues, and actions to reduce fragmentation of effort will be critical.</p> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.dawn.com/news/1314377/world-radio-day" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Radio Day</a></strong><br /><strong>Dawn</strong><br /> RADIO remains the most dynamic and engaging mediums in the 21st century, offering new ways to interact and participate. This powerful communication tool and low-cost medium can reach the widest audience, including remote communities and vulnerable people such as the illiterate, the disabled, women, youth and the poor. Radio offers these communities a platform to intervene in public debate, irrespective of their educational level. It provides an opportunity to participate in policy and decision-making processes, and to protect and promote the diversity of cultural expression. The impact of radio is at different levels: it is an essential tool in times of disaster management as an effective medium to reach affected people when other means of communication are disrupted; it is a way of promoting gender equality by providing rural women access to knowledge and support; finally, it is inclusive, engaging youth in the media as catalysts of change.</div></div></div> Thu, 16 Feb 2017 14:30:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7633 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-230 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img alt="World of News" height="139" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="140" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span><br />   <p> <strong><a href="http://www.broadbandcommission.org/publications/Pages/SOB-2015.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The State of Broadband 2015: Broadband as a Foundation for Sustainable Development</a></strong><br /> Broadband Commission<br /> Broadband Internet is failing to reach those who could benefit most, with Internet access reaching near-saturation in the world’s rich nations but not advancing fast enough to benefit the billions of people living in the developing world, according to the 2015 edition of the State of Broadband report. Released today just ahead of the forthcoming SDG Summit in New York and the parallel meeting of the Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development on September 26, the report reveals that 57% of the world’s people remain offline and unable to take advantage of the enormous economic and social benefits the Internet can offer.</p> <p> <strong><a href="http://www.africaprogresspanel.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/APP_REPORT_2015_FINAL_low1.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">POWER PEOPLE PLANET: Seizing Africa’s energy and climate opportunities</a></strong><br /> Africa Progress Panel<br /> Can the world prevent catastrophic climate change while building the energy systems needed to sustain growth, create jobs and lift millions of people out of poverty? That question goes to the heart of the defining development challenges of the 21st century, and is the focus of this year’s report. It is a vital question for Africa. No region has done less to contribute to the climate crisis, but no region will pay a higher price for failure to tackle it.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 24 Sep 2015 14:32:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7169 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere People Power: What Do We Know About Empowered Citizens and Development? http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/people-power-what-do-we-know-about-empowered-citizens-and-development <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="187" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/12592678255_5c5bf7abcc_o.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="280" />This is a short piece written for UNDP, which is organizing my <a href="http://kapuscinskilectures.eu/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Kapuscinski lecture</a> in Malta on Wednesday (4pm GMT, webcast live)</p> <p> Power is intangible, but crucial; a subtle and pervasive force field connecting individuals, communities and nations in a constant process of negotiation, contestation and change. Development is, at its heart, about the redistribution and accumulation of power by citizens.</p> <p> Much of the standard work on empowerment focuses on institutions and the world of formal power – can people vote, express dissent, organise, find decent jobs, get access to information and justice?</p> <p> These are all crucial questions, but there is an earlier stage; power ‘within’. The very first step of empowerment takes place in the hearts and minds of the individuals who ask: ‘Do I have rights? Am I a fit person to express a view? Why should anyone listen to me? Am I willing and able to speak up, and what will happen if I do?’</p> <p> Asking, (and answering) such questions is the first step in exercising citizenship, the process by which men and women engage with each other, and with decision-makers; coming together to seek improvements in their lives. Such engagement can be peaceful (the daily exercise of the social contract between citizen and state), but it may also involve disagreement and conflict, particularly when power must be surrendered by the powerful, to empower those ‘beneath’ them.</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 17 Dec 2014 19:27:00 +0000 Duncan Green 6910 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #8 from 2013: Today’s Grimfographic: How Many People Die a Violent Death, Where and How? http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/8-2013-today-s-grimfographic-how-many-people-die-violent-death-where-and-how <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><strong>Our Top Ten Blog Posts from 2013</strong><br /> This post was originally published on July 31, 2013</em><br /><br /> From <a href="http://aoav.org.uk/2013/global-burden-of-armed-violence/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Action on Armed Violence</a> using data from the Geneva Declaration’s <a href="http://www.genevadeclaration.org/measurability/global-burden-of-armed-violence.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Global Burden of Armed Violence report</a> (whose link seems to be down at the moment). Key points to note:</p> <p> Only one in 8 violent deaths occur in the ‘conflict settings’ so beloved of news coverage. Most of the rest are ‘intentional homicides’ committed in gun and drug-plagued (but supposedly non-conflict) countries like <a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/country_profiles/1220684.stm" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">El Salvador</a> (at 62 deaths per 100,000 people, the world’s most violent ‘peaceful’ country). People often claim the death toll in El Salvador is now worse than during its 1980s civil war, but the numbers don’t seem to add up – 70,000 died over about 12 years in that war, whereas the current carnage kills ‘only’ about 3,600 a year. Latin America remains the world’s homicide hotspot.</p> <p> Total global death toll is 526,000. That’s a shocking one a minute, but <a href="http://www.who.int/gho/road_safety/mortality/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">less than half the deaths from road accidents</a> (which I imagine have a similar victim demographic).</p> <p> But things can improve.  The murder rate in El Salvador has halved since the data for this report was gathered, thanks to <a href="http://www.insightcrime.org/news-briefs/el-salvador-homicides-gang-truce-2013" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">a truce struck between the country’s two main street gangs</a>.</p> </div></div></div> Fri, 27 Dec 2013 19:47:00 +0000 Duncan Green 6419 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere What Does Social Exclusion Have to Do with the Attacks at Westgate, Nairobi? Asking the Right Questions http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/what-does-social-exclusion-have-do-attacks-westgate-nairobi-asking-right-questions <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1443708282_46a36cfc21.jpg" style="float:left; height:186px; width:280px" />Elif Yavuz, a former World Bank consultant, was amongst the 68 people who died in the attack at the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi in September of this year. At the time of her death, Elif was working for the Clinton Foundation. Hers had been a life dedicated to fighting poverty and disease.<br />  <br /> The horror of what enfolded at Westgate is a reminder of the pervasive threat of insecurity, and at the same time of our efforts to protect lives and preserve human dignity the world over. The massacre raises questions, too. Are we deploying the right tools to help put an end to such violence? And what is the role, if any, that development practitioners can play in preventing them? The recently released World Bank report, <a href="http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2013/10/09/inclusion-matters" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><em>Inclusion Matters: The Foundation for Shared Prosperity</em></a>, provides us with some ideas.<br />  <br /> The Al-Shabab attack in Nairobi was a tragedy for the victims and their families. Nevertheless, countless numbers of people across the globe die every day in less violent circumstances, and yet just as needlessly – from disease and malnutrition for example.  Consider malaria – the issue on which Elif had been working: the latest data show that more than one million people, the majority of them children under the age of five in Africa, are likely to die of malaria this year. Many of these deaths occur in countries where wealth and opportunity are to be found, but the wealth is concentrated in the hands of only a few, while others are barred from opportunities. The evidence suggests that these inequalities, and the feelings of injustice and powerlessness they engender, have the potential to fuel conflict and tempt people to espouse radical ideologies and resort to violence as a means of addressing injustice.</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 12 Nov 2013 15:02:00 +0000 Sadaf Lakhani 6527 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Images of War vs Peace http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/images-war-vs-peace <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Johanna/2009%200210-streetLight-41%20copy.jpg" style="float:left; height:186px; width:280px" />Browsing Facebook back in August, I was greeted with a stark photograph of a young man doing homework under the glow of a newly installed street light in the Liberian capital, Monrovia.  I clicked on the next image: grinning children on a swing.  Next: a policewoman shines out from her patrol on the Old Road; child soldiers hand in weapons in Tubmanburg; and the baby of a returning refugee is handed down from a truck.  There were many more dramatic images on the slide show - shared on the social network by the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/UNMIL2003" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">United Nations Mission in Liberia</a>.  It was titled “<a href="http://unmil.unmissions.org/Default.aspx?tabid=5482&amp;language=en-US" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">10 years of Peace</a>”.  I “liked” it.  It’s rare to see such images of peace.  Each photograph illustrated a powerful back-story of recovery – and together they plotted a credible and inspiring path to peace.  My knowledge of Liberia doubled in five minutes.<br />  <br /> A month later on <a href="http://www.internationaldayofpeace.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">International Day of Peace</a> those same images were the subject of discussion at <a href="http://www.african.cam.ac.uk/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Centre of African Studies</a> at Cambridge University.  Now framed and hanging in the Centre, it was interesting to gauge people’s reactions.  A small group had assembled and although many of them were African, they also confessed to having no prior knowledge of Liberia.  One touching observation, “This shows Liberians path to peace by Liberians…it is African’s who have made peace here”.  True - although the photographs had been taken by United Nations photographers, the presence of the UN was distinctly low key.  We also had a discussion about images of so-called “peace” being used for propaganda purposes.  As a self-confessed cynic, I fully sympathize, but these set of images felt far more than just PR for the United Nations.</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 16 Oct 2013 18:35:00 +0000 Caroline Jaine 6497 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The Conflict Resolution Elephant in the Room http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/conflict-resolution-elephant-room <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=210 alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Johanna/file0002097670218.jpg" width=280 align=left>Last week I spent an evening sitting beneath a mammoth painting of <EM>Alfred Inciting the Saxons to prevent the landing of the Danes</EM> in Committee room 10 at the Houses Parliament in London.&nbsp; A Member of Parliament called Slaughter introduced two peace-building academics in an irony I'm sure he is very tired of.</P> <P>We were there to listen and discuss the notion of <A href="http://www.engi.org.uk/" target=_blank>Conflict Resolution in the context of Islam</A>. Professor Mohamed Abu Nimer, the Director of the Salaam Institute for Peace and Justice spoke first about how Islamic peace-building was no different from any other in that it was all about justice, peace, mercy, forgiveness, compassion and equality.&nbsp; It’s the basic teachings, he professed that a parent offers a five-year-old child.&nbsp; He went on to describe the nuances that were different when working in Muslim communities. Unfortunately he spent longer on the nuances than he did in examining common ground and the nuances themselves underplayed the vast diversity in Islamic tradition across the Muslim world (which he later acknowledged). Time was short.&nbsp;</P> <P>I disagreed with the second speaker, Dr Ayse Kadayifci-Orellana who claimed, when an Afghan in the audience challenged this broad-brush approach, that culture and religion are entirely separate.&nbsp; Surely one is bound up in another?&nbsp;</div></div></div> Tue, 05 Feb 2013 20:54:18 +0000 Caroline Jaine 6233 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-82 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=120 alt="" hspace=0 src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_photo.jpeg" width=121 align=left border=0></P> <P>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</P> <P><STRONG>NPR<BR></STRONG><A href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/08/15/158783117/saving-lives-in-africa-with-the-humble-sweet-potato" target=_blank>Saving Lives In Africa With The Humble Sweet Potato</A></P> <P>“A regular old orange-colored sweet potato might not seem too exciting to many of us.</P> <P>But in parts of Africa, that sweet potato is very exciting to public health experts who see it as a living vitamin A supplement. A campaign to promote orange varieties of sweet potatoes in Mozambique and Uganda (instead of the white or yellow ones that are more commonly grown there) now seems to be succeeding. (Check out this cool infographic on the campaign.) It's a sign that a new approach to improving nutrition among the world's poor might actually work.</P> <P>That approach is called biofortification: adding crucial nutrients to food biologically, by breeding better varieties of crops that poor people already eat.”&nbsp; <A href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/08/15/158783117/saving-lives-in-africa-with-the-humble-sweet-potato" target=_blank>READ MORE</A></P> <P></div></div></div> Thu, 23 Aug 2012 14:50:06 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6077 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere How Can INGOs Improve their Work in Fragile and Conflict States? http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/how-can-ingos-improve-their-work-fragile-and-conflict-states <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=238 alt="" hspace=0 src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Johanna/1096440379_85299a1ed2.jpeg" width=280 align=left border=0>There’s nothing like the impending threat of giving a talk to make you mug up on an issue, usually the morning before. Today’s exercise in skating on thin ice (the secret? Keep moving. Fast as possible) was a recent talk to some Indiana University students studying the developmental role of the state while enjoying our splendid <A href="http://www.sott.net/articles/show/247687-Worst-ever-British-summer-already-over-with-cold-wet-weather-forecast-until-September" target=_blank>British summer</A> (ahem).</P> <P>I gave them the standard FP2P spiel on Active Citizens and Effective States (powerpoint <A href="http://www.oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/?attachment_id=10922" target=_blank>here</A> - just keep clicking), but then got into the different roles INGOs play in countries with different types of state. The big distinction is between stable and unstable states, but there are lots of subcategories (middle v low income; democratic v autocratic; willing (nice) v unwilling (nasty); centralized v decentralized; aid dependent or not). But my recent <A href="http://www.oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/?p=10659" target=_blank>crash-and-burn experience</A> of trying to come up with a typology was salutary, and I won’t try and repeat the exercise.</div></div></div> Thu, 19 Jul 2012 17:49:52 +0000 Duncan Green 6046 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere How Can an NGO Campaign against Rape in Armed Conflict? An Inspiring Case Study from Colombia http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/how-can-ngo-campaign-against-rape-armed-conflict-inspiring-case-study-colombia <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><EM><IMG height=236 alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Johanna/colombia-sexual-violence-report-2.jpg" width=180 align=left>I recently ran a fascinating workshop with colleagues at <A href="http://www.intermonoxfam.org/" target=_blank>Intermón Oxfam</A>&nbsp;(Oxfam’s Spanish affiliate) at which the different country programmes brought examples of change processes at work. One that particularly struck me was about our work in Colombia on sexual violence and conflict. Here’s the write up, jointly authored with Intermon’s Alejandro Matos.</EM></P> <P>The campaign began in 2009, jointly agreed by Intermón Oxfam and 9 national women’s and human rights organizations. The main aim was to make visible, at national and international level, the widespread use of sexual violence as a tactic by all sides in the armed conflict, and the gaps and failings in the responses of the Colombian state, in terms of prevention and punishment, the end of impunity and the care of women victims.</div></div></div> Thu, 05 Jul 2012 15:47:45 +0000 Duncan Green 6035 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere