New York Times http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/592/all en Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-308 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <strong><a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2183144613_51456feb78_z_1_15.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2183144613_51456feb78_z_1_15.jpg" style="float:right" title="" width="180" /></a>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</strong><br /><br /><strong><a href="http://en.unesco.org/news/unesco-releases-new-publication-protecting-journalism-sources-digital-age" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Protecting Journalism Sources in the Digital Age</a></strong><br /><strong>UNESCO</strong><br /><span>While the rapidly emerging digital environment offers great opportunities for journalists to investigate and report information in the public interest, it also poses particular challenges regarding the privacy and safety of journalistic sources. These challenges include: mass surveillance as well as targeted surveillance, data retention, expanded and broad antiterrorism measures, and national security laws and over-reach in the application of these. All these can undermine the confidentiality protection of those who collaborate with journalists, and who are essential for revealing sensitive information in the public interest but who could expose themselves to serious risks and pressures. The effect is also to chill whistleblowing and thereby undermine public access to information and the democratic role of the media. In turn, this jeopardizes the sustainability of quality journalism.</span></p> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/27/opinion/do-sweatshops-lift-workers-out-of-poverty.html?_r=2" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Everything We Knew About Sweatshops Was Wrong</a></strong><br /><strong>New York Times</strong><br /> In the 1990s, Americans learned more about the appalling conditions at the factories where our sneakers and T-shirts were made, and opposition to sweatshops surged. But some economists pushed back. For them, the wages and conditions in sweatshops might be appalling, but they are an improvement on people’s less visible rural poverty. As the economist Joan Robinson said, “The misery of being exploited by capitalists is nothing compared to the misery of not being exploited at all.” Textbook economics offers two reasons factory jobs can be “an escalator out of poverty.” First, a booming industrial sector should raise wages over time. Second, boom or not, factory jobs might be better than the alternatives: Unlike agriculture or informal market selling, these factories pay a steady wage, and if workers gained skills valued by the market, they might earn higher wages. Factories may also have incentives to pay more than agricultural or informal market work to persuade workers to stay and be productive. Expecting to prove the experts right, we went to Ethiopia and — working with the Innovations for Poverty Action and the Ethiopian Development Research Institute — performed the first randomized trial of industrial employment on workers. Little did we anticipate that everything we believed would turn out to be wrong.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 11 May 2017 13:56:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7716 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-298 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2_3.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="178" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2_3.jpg" style="float:right" title="" width="180" /></a><strong>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/06/health/cholera-vaccine-bangladesh.html?_r=0" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Turning the Tide Against Cholera</a><br /> New York Times</strong><br /> Two hundred years ago, the first cholera pandemic emerged from these tiger-infested mangrove swamps. It began in 1817, after the British East India Company sent thousands of workers deep into the remote Sundarbans, part of the Ganges River Delta, to log the jungles and plant rice. These brackish waters are the cradle of Vibrio cholerae, a bacterium that clings to human intestines and emits a toxin so virulent that the body will pour all of its fluids into the gut to flush it out. Water loss turns victims ashen; their eyes sink into their sockets, and their blood turns black and congeals in their capillaries. Robbed of electrolytes, their hearts lose their beat. Victims die of shock and organ failure, sometimes in as little as six hours after the first abdominal rumblings. Cholera probably had festered here for eons. Since that first escape, it has circled the world in seven pandemic cycles that have killed tens of millions.</p> <p> <strong><a href="http://blogs.cfr.org/cyber/2017/02/28/the-relationship-between-internet-access-and-economic-growth-is-not-as-strong-as-you-think/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Link Between Internet Access and Economic Growth Is Not as Strong as You Think</a></strong><br /><strong>CFR-Net Politics</strong><br /> Mark Zuckerberg recently published a manifesto about the future of Facebook and our increasingly technology-saturated world. In it, he argued “Connecting everyone to the internet is…necessary for building an informed community.” For those familiar with Zuckerberg’s statements, this is a familiar claim. He argues that not only should we connect everyone in the world to the internet, but that doing so is a necessary step in solving some of the planet’s most pernicious problems. Zuckerberg is not alone in this thinking. Huge sums of money have been invested in projects that connect the billions of people who lack an internet connection. These schemes tend to present digital connectivity as a mechanism to achieve key social and economic developmental goals. This is especially true in Africa–the part of the world with both the lowest incomes and rates of connectivity. Because of the vigor with which such claims are made, and the vast resources that tech companies are able to deploy, we decided to examine the actually existing evidence base that might support them. In a new paper, we set out to test those claims.</p> <p> </div></div></div> Thu, 02 Mar 2017 05:10:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7650 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-127 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/medium_weekly_wire_photo_12.jpeg" style="float:right; height:120px; width:120px" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><strong>Water for People</strong><br /><a href="http://www.waterforpeople.org/media-center/social-disruptors-podcasts/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Social Disruptors</a><br /><br /> “The Social Disruptor podcast series, hosted by CEO Ned Breslin, will highlight innovators across industries from music to fashion to sports – people in the business of pushing limits, finding unseen opportunities and moving on them. Hosted monthly, the series will focus on positive change in the world and how these change makers overcome obstacles and shake things up to achieve sustainable impact.  Breslin will interview CEOs, artists, international voices, and leaders from a variety of sectors to understand what it takes to accomplish lasting social change.  Change: you can embrace it, cause it, influence it or resist it.”  <a href="http://www.waterforpeople.org/media-center/social-disruptors-podcasts/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">READ MORE</a><br /><br /></div></div></div> Thu, 01 Aug 2013 15:41:00 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6421 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-77 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=120 alt="" hspace=0 src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_photo.jpeg" width=121 align=left border=0></P> <P>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</P> <P><STRONG>Mashable<BR></STRONG><A href="http://mashable.com/2012/07/18/gmail-sms/" target=_blank>Gmail Downgrades, Launches SMS Version for African Countries</A></P> <P>“While we’re used to seeing upgrades from our favorite tech products, Gmail has made an important step in the opposite direction.</P> <P>Google launched Gmail SMS Wednesday, offering a mobile-based email solution for people in Kenya, Nigeria and Ghana. Gmail SMS is a tech downgrade, but it’s a lifestyle upgrade for email users without consistent Internet access.</P> <P>“There’s so much you do with it: apply for a job, make an inquiry, get notifications from your social network, receive photos or an invitation that makes you smile, and just communicate back and forth with your friends,” said a post on Google’s Africa blog.”&nbsp; <A href="http://mashable.com/2012/07/18/gmail-sms/">READ MORE</A></P> <P></div></div></div> Thu, 19 Jul 2012 14:30:20 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6044 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-75 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=120 alt="" hspace=0 src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_photo.jpeg" width=121 align=left border=0></P> <P>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</P> <P><STRONG>Huff Post Tech<BR></STRONG><A href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/02/twitter-transparency-report_n_1644596.html?utm_hp_ref=technology&amp;utm_hp_ref=technology" target=_blank>Twitter Transparency Report Show Government Requests For User Data. Now It's Facebook's Turn</A></P> <P>“For the first time ever, Twitter has issued a transparency report card that sheds light on how often it's been asked by government officials to delete tweets and hand over user information -- and how frequently the social media site has complied.</P> <P>Twitter's inaugural Transparency Report, based on activity during the first half of this year, details government requests for user data, authorities' efforts to have tweets removed and copyright takedown notices. It suggests officials are taking a more active interest in Twitter users' activity: Twitter's legal policy manager Jeremy Kessel writes, ‘We’ve received more government requests in the first half of 2012, as outlined in this initial dataset, than in the entirety of 2011.’”&nbsp; <A href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/02/twitter-transparency-report_n_1644596.html?utm_hp_ref=technology&amp;utm_hp_ref=technology" target=_blank>READ MORE</A></P> <P></div></div></div> Thu, 05 Jul 2012 15:21:30 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6034 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-58 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=120 alt="" hspace=0 src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/medium_weekly_wire_photo_3.jpeg" width=120 align=left border=0>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</P> <P><STRONG>CIPE Global<BR></STRONG><A href="http://www.cipe.org/blog/?p=10754" target=_blank>20 Empowered Women that You Should Be Following on Twitter</A></P> <P>“Men are from Mars, women are from Venus – we’ve all heard that before.&nbsp; It’s no secret that the men and women are treated differently, but when it comes down to the heart of the matter, women are just as capable of success, if not more so, than their galactic counterparts.</P> <P>With International Women’s Day fast approaching, CIPE is highlighting ways to help the movement for women’s empowerment. CIPE’s programs approach women’s empowerment through institutional reform, economic and political empowerment, and working with partner organizations to look beyond financial assistance – by helping women build leadership and business skills, CIPE focuses on preparing women for participation, whether they’re running a business, advocating legislative reforms, or simply making the world a better place for taking care of their families.” <A href="http://www.cipe.org/blog/?p=10754" target=_blank>READ MORE</A></div></div></div> Thu, 08 Mar 2012 16:01:29 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 5918 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: the Global Forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-50 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=119 alt="" hspace=0 src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/weekly_wire_photo_0.jpeg" width=120 align=left border=0>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</P> <P><STRONG>International Development Research Centre<BR></STRONG><A href="http://www.idrc.ca/EN/Resources/Publications/Pages/IDRCBookDetails.aspx?PublicationID=829" target=_blank>Local Governance and ICTs in Africa</A></P> <P>"With governance high on the agenda in Africa, many governments are using information and communications technologies (ICTs) to develop ways in which they deliver services to citizens. E-governance has the potential to enable local governments to engage citizens in greater participation, leading to socioeconomic developments at local and national levels. But this potential remains largely unexploited and, until now, there has been a lack of evidence on information technology in local governance in Africa.</P> <P>This book addresses that gap. It offers studies from nine African countries that explore how ICTs can transform service delivery, tax, financial management, land management, education, local economic development, citizen registration, and political inclusion." <A href="http://www.idrc.ca/EN/Resources/Publications/Pages/IDRCBookDetails.aspx?PublicationID=829" target=_blank>READ MORE</A></div></div></div> Thu, 12 Jan 2012 15:17:49 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 5881 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #3: It's About Dignity and Poverty, Not About Facebook http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/its-about-dignity-and-poverty-not-about-facebook <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=255 alt="" hspace=0 src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/files/publicsphere/Egypt.jpeg" width=180 align=left border=0><STRONG><EM>Our Top Ten Blog Posts by Readership in 2011</EM></STRONG></P> <P><EM>Originally published on February 8, 2011</EM></P> <P>Frank Rich, op-ed columnist at the <A href="http://www.nytimes.com/pages/opinion/index.html" target=_blank>New York Times</A>, <A href="http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/06/opinion/06rich.html?_r=1" target=_blank>made a very important point </A>this week: Revolutions are not about Facebook and Twitter. Revolutions are about human dignity and hunger. It seems that a few journalists are trying to push the (mainstream) media's fascination with the role of (social) media in Egypt, Tunisia, and Iran toward a more realistic point of view. After a prime-time CNN <A href="http://piersmorgan.blogs.cnn.com/2011/01/31/social-media-in-egypt-reporter-turns-to-twitter-after-newspaper-site-shut-down/" target=_blank>talking head </A>stated that social media are the most fascinating thing about the events in Egypt (!), some senior journalists seem to have had it with the ICT hype. Rich tries to pull attention to why people rise up against their government: "starting with the issues of human dignity and crushing poverty."</P> <P></div></div></div> Thu, 29 Dec 2011 15:25:58 +0000 Anne-Katrin Arnold 5650 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Quote of the Week: Thomas Friedman http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/quote-week-thomas-friedman <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><EM><IMG height=270 alt="" hspace=0 src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/friedman.jpg" width=180 align=left border=0>"One wonders whether the Internet, blogging, Twitter, texting and microblogging ... have made participatory democracy and autocracy so participatory, and leaders so finely attuned to every nuance of public opinion, that they find it hard to make any big decision that requires sacrifice. They have too many voices in their heads other than their own."</EM></P> <P style="TEXT-ALIGN: right">&nbsp;</P> <P style="TEXT-ALIGN: right"><A href="http://topics.nytimes.com/top/opinion/editorialsandoped/oped/columnists/thomaslfriedman/index.html?inline=nyt-per" target=_blank>Thomas L. Friedman</A></P> <P style="TEXT-ALIGN: right"><A href="http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/16/opinion/whos-the-decider.html" target=_blank>New York Times</A>, November 15, 2011</div></div></div> Mon, 21 Nov 2011 16:08:31 +0000 Anne-Katrin Arnold 5857 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Bring in the Hooligans - Lessons in Coalition Building http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/bring-hooligans-lessons-coalition-building <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="175" alt="" hspace="0" width="280" align="left" border="0" src="/files/publicsphere/Tahrir%20Square.jpeg" />A lesson in coalition building comes to us from Egypt via the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/14/world/middleeast/14egypt-tunisia-protests.html">New York Times</a>. In an analysis of the build-up to the Egyptian Revolution, two NYT reporters show us how careful planning of events and allies led to one of the most important political events of our time in the region. The coalition that made such an impact consists of young people from Serbia, Tunisia, and Egypt, American&nbsp;and Russian intellectuals (some of them dead), Facebook groups, marketing specialists - and hooligans.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 17 Feb 2011 15:22:34 +0000 Anne-Katrin Arnold 5659 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Breaking the Impasse: Public Participation in Budget Disputes http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/breaking-impasse-public-participation-budget-disputes <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img height="200" alt="" hspace="0" width="200" align="left" border="0" src="/files/publicsphere/keys.jpg" />California&rsquo;s recent budget debacle is not an isolated case.&nbsp; An opinion piece entitled &quot;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/28/opinion/28leib.html">Budgets by the People, for the People</a>&quot; by Chris Elmendorf and Ethan J. Leib in <em><a target="_blank" href="http://www.nytimes.com/">The New York Times </a></em>reports that since 2002, 14 States in the U.S. have experienced delays in budget approval.&nbsp; They also suggest a solution.&nbsp; The key to resolving budget deadlocks is citizen participation.&nbsp;</p> <p>Here&rsquo;s what they propose.&nbsp;</p> </div></div></div> Mon, 03 Aug 2009 18:38:37 +0000 Antonio Lambino 5235 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Transparency, Participation, Collaboration http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/transparency-participation-collaboration <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><img class="" height="248" alt="" hspace="0" width="165" align="left" border="0" src="/files/publicsphere/image/door.jpg" />On my way home from work last Friday, I chanced upon a fascinating interview on C-SPAN radio on government transparency, access to public information, and citizen participation at the U.S. Federal level.&nbsp; New York Law School Professor <a target="_blank" href="http://www.nyls.edu/faculty/faculty_profiles/beth_simone_noveck">Beth Noveck</a>, currently serving as White House deputy chief technology officer, was talking about the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/open/">open government initiative</a>.&nbsp; One of its key&nbsp;components is a site (<a target="_blank" href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/open/">whitehouse.gov/open</a>) dedicated to Web 2.0-based <em>transparency</em>, <em>participation</em>, and <em>collaboration </em>efforts of the U.S. Federal Government.&nbsp; The site links to online resources where citizens can access public information (transparency) and provide input into the policymaking process (participation).&nbsp; The goal is not just consulting citizens on public matters, said Noveck, but a structured process through which they can help generate actual policy options.&nbsp; Other links bring users to sites that seek specialist input on military science, education, small businesses, and technology applications in international development (collaboration).&nbsp;</p> <p></div></div></div> Wed, 27 May 2009 17:44:50 +0000 Antonio Lambino 4988 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere