The World Region http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/254/all en Campaign Art: Can we save the Ocean? http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-can-we-save-ocean <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</strong><br /><br /> Our oceans are in deep trouble. Uncontrolled <a href="http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/blue_planet/problems/pollution/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">pollution</a> and <a href="http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/blue_planet/problems/problems_fishing/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">overfishing</a> have brought the state of many of our seas and oceans to an unprecedentedly precarious situation.<br /><br /> In recent years, multiple campaigns have sparked to raise awareness of this situation and motivate people and governments to take action. For example, the <a href="http://www.oceanhealthindex.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Ocean Health Index</a> measures ocean health across the regions in the World. One of these campaigns is <a href="http://www.oneworldoneocean.com/pages/why-the-ocean" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">One World One Ocean</a>. Based in California, United States, this organization produces films, infographics, short videos and other media products to raise awareness of ocean degradation and to spark a global movement to protect the seas.<br /><br /> The video “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qojYm8JHKfE" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Why the Ocean?</a>” by One World One Ocean provides interesting and alarming data on the oceans’ situation and encourages everyone, everywhere to take action.<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-233 asset-video"> <strong > Why the Ocean? </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/qojYm8JHKfE?wmode=transparent"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/qojYm8JHKfE?wmode=transparent" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div></div></div></div> Wed, 03 Feb 2016 17:27:00 +0000 Davinia Levy 7294 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Media (R)evolutions: New Publications on Media Development around the World http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/media-revolutions-new-publications-media-development-around-world <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a> brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.<br /><br /><img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/7826373720_b233f4531c_o.jpg" style="float:left; height:186px; width:280px" />Twice a year, <a href="http://www.cameco.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">CAMECO</a>, a consultancy specializing in media and communications, publishes a list of selected publications on media and communications in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. This rich resource includes 210 titles, covering 160 countries worldwide. Many of the titles can be downloaded directly. <p> </div></div></div> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:34:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6678 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Migration and Development: Who Bears the Burden of Proof? Justin Sandefur replies to Paul Collier http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/migration-and-development-who-bears-burden-proof-justin-sandefur-replies-paul-collier <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><a href="http://www.cgdev.org/expert/justin-sandefur" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Justin Sandefur </a>responds to <a href="http://oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/how-does-emigration-affect-countries-of-origin-paul-collier-kicks-off-a-debate-on-migration/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">yesterday’s post </a>by Paul Collier on the impact of migration on developing countries, and you get to vote.</em></p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Johanna/Justin-Sandefur1.jpg" style="float:left; height:170px; width:170px" />The global diaspora of educated Africans, Asians, and Latin Americans living in the developed world stand accused of undermining the development of their countries of origin.</p> <p> Paul Collier’s recent book, <a href="http://global.oup.com/academic/product/exodus-9780195398656;jsessionid=F39FF29623C25485D749C8E35D43E642?cc=gb&amp;lang=en&amp;" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><em>Exodus</em></a>, makes the case for strict ceilings on the movement of people from poor countries to rich ones.  My colleague Michael Clemens and I already reviewed the book at length for <em>Foreign Affairs</em> (ungated <a href="http://www.cgdev.org/publication/let-people-go-problem-strict-migration-limits" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">here</a>), but Duncan asked me to respond to the specific issue Paul raised in his recent post for this blog: that skilled migration from some low-income countries is so high that it undermines the development prospects of people “left behind”.</p> <p> I suspect many people reading this blog in Europe or North America share Professor Collier’s skepticism about skilled migration. You are not racist or xenophobic.  You are concerned about the plight of the global poor, and you welcome diversity in your community. But you worry that maybe Paul’s right.  Maybe the fate of your university-educated Haitian neighbor down the street, earning a good salary and sending her kids to good schools since moving to the UK, is a distraction from, and maybe even a hindrance to, reducing poverty in Haiti.<br /></div></div></div> Wed, 19 Mar 2014 15:03:00 +0000 Duncan Green 6641 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Quote of the Week: Martin Luther King Jr. http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/quote-week-martin-luther-king-jr-1 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/large_mlk_2_0.jpeg" style="float:left; height:180px; width:180px" />"Men often hate each other because they fear each other; they fear each other because they don't know each other; they don't know each other because they can not communicate; they can not communicate because they are separated."</em></p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1964/king-bio.html" target="_blank">Martin Luther King, Jr.</a></p> <p> <a href="http://books.google.com/books/about/Stride%20Toward%20Freedom.html?id=7JTxjzefViYC">Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story, 1958</a></div></div></div> Tue, 21 Jan 2014 18:34:00 +0000 Sina Odugbemi 5882 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The End of Protest? Has Free-market Capitalism Learned to Control Dissent? http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/end-protest-has-free-market-capitalism-learned-control-dissent <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/AlasdairRobertsEndofProtest-bookcover.jpg" style="float:left; height:300px; width:200px" />The central puzzle has often been wondered about in a thousand and one fora since the global financial crisis that began in 2008 erupted, wreaking havoc with several economies and millions of lives: how is it that social convulsions have not been the resultant of the financial crisis, the deep depressions it led to in the major economies of the West, the misery inflicted on millions, and the super-elite-pampering policies introduced to deal with the crisis? Why did puny efforts at protest like Occupy Wall Street and its many imitators vanish like candlelight in a storm?<br /><br /> In the new e-book, <a href="http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100222390" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><em>The End of Protest: How Free-Market Capitalism Learned to Control Dissent</em></a>,[i] Alasdair Roberts, who is the Jerome L. Rappaport Professor of Law and Public Policy at Suffolk University Law School in Boston, takes on this puzzle and offers an explanation.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 09 Jan 2014 17:32:00 +0000 Sina Odugbemi 6575 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere #6 from 2013: The Limits of Institutional Reform in Development - Changing Rules for Realistic Solutions: Getting Stuff Done http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/6-2013-limits-institutional-reform-development-changing-rules-realistic-solutions-getting-stuff-done <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/9781107016330i.jpg" style="float:left; height:314px; width:210px" /><em><strong>Our Top Ten Blog Posts by readership in 2013</strong><br /> This post was originally published on February 21, 2013</em><br /> <br /> There is a silent struggle going regarding how you do governance reforms in development. It is between the prevailing tendency and a small but growing band of practitioners saying things need to be done differently. The prevailing tendency is the packaging of experts-devised best practice packages that we take from country to country…model anti-corruption laws, model designs for the civil service, procurement systems, and financial management systems and so on. Our highly trained experts are invested in their solutions, and the modern global system has a growing array of policy networks on every issue under the sun, and they amass and disseminate norms of ideal practice. So, donors and their experts move from one country to another, offering money, loans, and these packages.&nbsp; So, how are things working out? Not very well is the answer. To use an Americanism; we are not getting stuff done that much when it comes to governance reforms, whatever the sector. Isn’t it high time we changed our ways?</div></div></div> Thu, 02 Jan 2014 18:30:00 +0000 Sina Odugbemi 6251 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Living in a Panopticon http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/living-panopticon <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Panopticon.jpeg" style="float:left; height:186px; margin:0px; width:280px" />"I have nothing to hide" - that's a sentence I dread in conversations about blurred lines between what's private and what's public. I hear it often in discussions about reality TV, Facebook pictures, and surveillance technologies, including cameras on every street corner and in every bus.<br /> For surveillance, there is a security argument to be made – personal security, national security. For Facebook and reality TV, there’s an entertainment argument to be made – it’s what the audience likes to see, and in any case, the inhabitants of the Big Brother house chose to be there. These arguments are insufficient. The problem about blurring the lines between what’s private and what’s public is a matter of principle, not a matter of personal convenience.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 07 Nov 2013 18:22:00 +0000 Anne-Katrin Arnold 6522 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The Complex World of 'Giving' http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/complex-world-giving <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/ID-100201451.jpg" style="float:left; height:207px; width:280px" />Have you ever been conflicted by the word charity or the idea of charity? I have. I cannot pinpoint exactly why, but I’ve always had a philosophical dilemma about what it is, and how it should be. I was recently prompted to think about it again when I read a few articles and listened to a segment on National Public Radio that talked about the different ways in which people and institutions ‘give’ and whether or not these are good ideas. <br /><br /> A New York Times article, <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/18/magazine/is-it-nuts-to-give-to-the-poor-without-strings-attached.html?ref=magazine&amp;_r=2&amp;" rel="nofollow">Is It Nuts to Give to the Poor Without Strings Attached</a> talked about an organization called <a href="http://www.givedirectly.org/" rel="nofollow">GiveDirectly</a> which gives money directly to poor people without any preconditions. The idea is that people know best what they need, and providing money with strings attached is patronizing and less effective. GiveDirectly hired independent researchers to conduct a randomized controlled trial to see if this is an effective way of giving. Results are due later this year and they will be made public.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 10 Oct 2013 14:40:00 +0000 Shamiela Mir 6491 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Ascending the CSO Engagement Continuum II – Consultations http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/ascending-cso-engagement-continuum-ii-consultations <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Civil%20Socity%20Engagement%20Continuum%20-%20Consultation_1.jpg" style="float:left; height:255px; width:340px" />The Bank has learned a good deal about how to consult civil society over the years. The absence of consultation policies led to some of the most visible CSO advocacy campaigns opposing Bank-financed projects, such as the Narmada Dam in India and the Polonoreste Project in the Brazilian Amazon in the 1980s. Thus, while this third step on the civil society engagement continuum has been one of the most difficult to ascend, it has also shown the clearest progress in terms of more effective consultation practices.  As the latest edition of the <a href="http://siteresources.worldbank.org/CSO/Resources/228716-1369241545034/CSReviewFY10-12FINAL.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Bank–Civil Society Engagement Review of Fiscal Years 2010–12</a> demonstrates, today the Bank consults CSOs widely on its strategies, policies, programs, and projects worldwide.   <br /><br />  </p> </div></div></div> Tue, 03 Sep 2013 20:51:00 +0000 John Garrison 6456 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Quote of the Week: Sean Parker http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/quote-week-sean-parker <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/6256555261_785d90745d_n_0.jpg" style="float:left; height:207px; width:320px" />“Economically speaking, I profited handsomely from the destruction of the media as we knew it. The rest of the world did not make out so well, and society certainly got the worse end of the bargain.”</em><br /><br /><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sean_Parker" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Sean Parker</a>, an American entrepreneur who cofounded Napster and served as the first president of Facebook<br /><br /> As quoted in the <em>Financial Times</em>, June 28, 2013, <a href="http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/226e637e-df79-11e2-881f-00144feab7de.html#axzz2dptiMJgS" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Napster Co-founder Attacks Online Media Jackals</a></p> </div></div></div> Tue, 03 Sep 2013 13:34:00 +0000 Sina Odugbemi 6455 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The Dog Days of Summer http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/dog-days-summer <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/dog%20days%202.jpg" style="width:320px; height:256px; float:left" title="" />During these last warm days of summer, how about some climate cooling? This unusual idea is being proposed by David Keith, professor of public policy and applied physics at Harvard. In an article in the <a href="http://www.technologyreview.com/news/506256/geoengineering-could-be-essential-to-reducing-the-risk-of-climate-change/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">MIT Technology Review</a>, Keith says that reducing carbon emissions alone won’t be enough to stave off the arctic ice melt or loss of crops due to higher temperatures. He says that “geo-engineering” is one way to do this. This idea’s not without risks, however, and of course it is still untested.<br /><br /> The issue of climate change though is quite serious, and according to <a href="https://templatearchive.com/turn-down-the-heat-report/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><em>Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4°C World Must Be Avoided</em></a>, a report by the Potsdam Institute commissioned by the World Bank, the scenario of a world warming to 4°C is likely in this century. It should be noted that a warming of 2<em>°</em>C is considered by many to be the “tipping point” for irreversible environmental damage.</p> </div></div></div> Wed, 28 Aug 2013 14:15:00 +0000 Maya Brahmam 6452 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art:  More Bookworms, Fewer Intestinal Worms http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-more-bookworms-fewer-intestinal-worms <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/" rel="nofollow">People, Spaces, Deliberation</a>&nbsp;bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world.&nbsp; These examples are meant to inspire.<br /> &nbsp;</p> <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-28 asset-video"> <strong > More Bookworms, Fewer Intestinal Worms </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe width="500" height="315" src="// www.youtube.com/embed/grZWPOGUG9U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-desc field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"></div></div></div></div> </div></div></div></div> Wed, 28 Aug 2013 13:07:00 +0000 Kalliope Kokolis 6444 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Ascending the CSO Engagement Continuum I – Policy Dialogue http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/ascending-cso-engagement-continuum-i-policy-dialogue <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Civil%20Socity%20Engagement%20Continuum%20-%20Policy%20Dialogue%20New%20One.jpg" style="float:left; height:255px; width:340px" />Of all the steps on the World Bank – civil society engagement continuum, policy dialogue has experienced the greatest advances over the years. As highlighted in the latest edition of the <a href="http://siteresources.worldbank.org/CSO/Resources/228716-1369241545034/CSReviewFY10-12FINAL.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Bank–Civil Society Engagement Review of Fiscal Years 2010–12</a>, this interaction expanded over the past three years via a wide range of issues and events including Food Roundtables, book launches, and CSO conferences. It was the unprecedented number of CSO representatives who attended the Annual and Spring Meetings in recent years, however, which most clearly exemplified the growing intensity of the policy dialogue.<br />  <br /> Not many years ago, CSO voices at the Annual Meetings were more likely heard outside the security perimeter protesting a variety of Bank policies. Today, CSOs are coming inside in growing numbers to actively participate in the weeklong Civil Society Program. While only a handful of CSO representatives attended the Annual Meetings a decade ago, by 2011 this number had surpassed 600. CSOs came to dialogue with the heads of the Bank and the Fund, hold bilateral meetings with Executive Directors, engage the media, network with other CSOs, and organize policy sessions. Several participatory methodologies and new events embedded in the Civil Society Program have improved the quality of WB - CSO civil society participation at the Meetings:</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 27 Aug 2013 16:51:00 +0000 John Garrison 6450 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere What Can We Learn from Google's "Mistake?" http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/what-can-we-learn-googles-mistake-1 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Google.jpg" style="float:left; height:263px; width:350px" />Google’s every action is studied under a microscope.  However, one major “mistake” that Google made may have gotten lost.  Google’s policy of freeing up 20% time for all engineers, no management approval needed, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/16/google-20-percent-time_n_3768586.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">was cancelled</a>.  Yes, this is the same policy that was responsible for Gmail.  Google’s former policy had been held up as <a href="http://www.thinkwithgoogle.co.uk/quarterly/innovation/8-pillars-of-innovation.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">best practice</a> at Google <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/21/jobs/21pre.html?_r=2&amp;" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">and</a> in the tech community, and was advertised as a Googler perk.  Although the 20% rule had been <a href="http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2012/08/today-is-goof-off-at-work-day.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">used</a> at 3M and HP before, Google made it their own and resulted in industry changing products. <br /><br /> You may ask - why was the 20% rule such a good idea and why is removing it a mistake? The reason Google’s 20% time off is a great idea is because it worked and worked well. One needs a certain amount of freedom to be creative.  A study on mechanisms of grant funding (long term vs. short term) found that freedom encourages creativity when the freedom was believed to be long term.  “If you want people to branch out in new directions, then it’s important to provide for their long-term horizons, to give them time to experiment and potentially fail.  The researcher has to believe that short-term failure will not be punished” ” <a href="http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2009/creative-research-1209.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">says</a> Pierre Azoulay, an associate professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and an author of an MIT study on the subject. Freedom of thought inspires creativity and the development community, more than anyone else needs to break away from traditional thinking.</p> </div></div></div> Mon, 26 Aug 2013 16:19:00 +0000 Tanya Gupta 6448 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Quote of the Week: Sir Mervyn King http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/quote-week-sir-mervyn-king <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><img alt="" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/mervyn%20king_1.jpg" style="float:left; height:180px; width:240px" /><br /> “I’ve used the phrase ‘the audacity of pessimism.’ Only when things look bleak will people get round to doing anything.”</em><br /><br /> -<a href="http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/private/person.asp?personId=6243373&amp;privcapId=874036" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Sir Mervyn King</a>, Member of General Council at <a href="http://www.ecb.europa.eu/home/html/index.en.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">European Central Bank </a>and former Governor of <a href="http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/Pages/home.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Bank of England</a> (2003-2013)</p> </div></div></div> Mon, 26 Aug 2013 13:27:00 +0000 Sina Odugbemi 6445 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere