Forgiveness http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/7212/all en Rwanda's Artful Path Toward Peace: Cultural Industries and Post-Conflict Reconciliation http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/rwanda-s-artful-path-toward-peace-cultural-industries-and-post-conflict-reconciliation <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=195 alt="" hspace=0 src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/5013763645_b2f157cab2_n.jpeg" width=260 align=left border=0>In my last <A href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/art-war-cultural-policies-and-post-conflict-reconstruction" target=_blank>blog</A>, I wrote about a medium that plays a critical role in post-conflict reconciliation: art.&nbsp; I argued that the cultural industries—film, music, crafts, architecture, and theater, among other art forms—provide important benefits to post-conflict societies; therefore, policies that encourage the development and growth of these industries should be a critical part of a country’s comprehensive post-conflict reconstruction plan. In a further reflection on these points, this blog examines the story of Rwanda, a post-conflict society that is using film, theater, music, and other creative industries in its journey toward reconciliation and rebuilding.</div></div></div> Tue, 17 Apr 2012 15:03:46 +0000 Uwimana Basaninyenzi 5963 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere The Art of War: Cultural Policies and Post-Conflict Reconstruction http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/art-war-cultural-policies-and-post-conflict-reconstruction <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><P><IMG height=240 alt="" hspace=0 src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/art_of_war_0.jpeg" width=196 align=left border=0>Are post-conflict societies that foster, promote, and develop their cultural industries providing important reconciliation benefits to their communities? If so, should governments make cultural policy a vital part of their post-conflict reconstruction plans?</P> <P>After the traumatic experience of war, a number of policymakers may consider health, security, food, and shelter as the highest priorities without much consideration for culture. However, what many leaders in post-conflict zones often forget is that a conflicted, divided, and wounded population often compromises real prospects for peace and stability. Consequently, I argue that policies that encourage the development and growth of the cultural industries should be a critical part of post-conflict reconciliation efforts. </div></div></div> Wed, 22 Feb 2012 14:26:39 +0000 Uwimana Basaninyenzi 5908 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere