noncommunicable diseases http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/6070/all en Campaign Art: What’s the real cost of smoking? http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-what-s-real-cost-smoking <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</strong><br /><br /> The real cost of smoking is high, especially high on your health. According to the <a href="http://www.who.int/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Health Organization</a> (WHO), <a href="http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs339/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">tobacco kills around 6 million people each year, out of which 600,000 are the results of non-smokers being exposed to second-hand smoke.</a> The cost of smoking is also high on the global economy, as smoking burdens global health systems, hinders economic development, and deprives families of financial resources that could have been spent on education, food, shelter, or other needs.<br /><br /><a href="http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/health/brief/world-bank-and-tobacco-control-the-facts" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Tobacco use is the world’s leading underlying cause of preventable death</a>. It contributes to a great number of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), <a href="http://www.wpro.who.int/tobacco/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">which account for 63% of all deaths</a>. <strong>Prevention of tobacco use can significantly decrease the number of preventable deaths worldwide, encourage economic development, reduce poverty, encourage healthy lifestyle choices and support </strong><a href="http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/RES/70/1&amp;Lang=E" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Sustainable Development Goals</strong></a><strong>.</strong><br /><br /> In order to prevent and reduce youth tobacco use, in February 2014 the <a href="http://www.fda.gov/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">U.S. Food and Drug Administration</a> (FDA) put forward a national public education campaign titled “<a href="http://www.fda.gov/tobaccoproducts/publichealtheducation/publiceducationcampaigns/therealcostcampaign/default.htm" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Real Cost</a>.” The following video is a part of this campaign:<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-318 asset-video"> <strong > The Real Cost Commercial: &quot;Hacked&quot; (:30) </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/t0ujgVvgIXQ"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/t0ujgVvgIXQ" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div> <p> Source: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0ujgVvgIXQ" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">therealcost.betobaccofree.hhs.gov</a></p> </div></div></div> Wed, 01 Feb 2017 14:35:00 +0000 Darejani Markozashvili 7619 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly Wire: The Global Forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-197 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="" height="139" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br />  <br /><strong><a href="http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/28/-sp-africa-2030-drones-telemedicine-robots" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Africa in 2030: drones, telemedicine and robots?</a></strong><br /> The Guardian<br /> In 2000 the CIA’s national intelligence council made a series of pessimistic predictions about Africa. They suggested that sub-saharan Africa would become “less important to the international economy” by 2015; that African democracy had gone “as far as it could go”; and that technological advances would “not have a substantial positive impact on the African economies.”  Clearly, predictions don’t always come true. Between 2000 and 2012, the number of mobile connections in Africa grew by 44%. In 2011, mobile operators and their associated businesses in Africa has a “direct economic impact” of $32bn, and payed $12bn in taxes. It made up 4.4% of sub-Saharan Africa’s GDP, according to a 2012 report.  But the advances in communications are not the only element defining Africa’s future:<br />  <br /><strong><a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/bjornlomborg/2015/01/22/good-governance-well-meaning-slogan-or-desirable-development-goal/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Good Governance: Well-Meaning Slogan Or Desirable Development Goal?</a></strong><br /> Forbes<br /> Corruption last year cost the world more than one trillion dollars. That is a trillion dollars we can’t use to get better health care, education, food and environment. And corruption is only part of the problem of poor governance – many countries are run ineffectively, lacking accountability, transparency and rule of law.  Running countries better would have obvious benefits. It would not only reduce corruption but governments would provide more services the public wants and at better quality. It is also likely that economic growth would increase. In a recent UN survey of seven million people around the world, an honest and responsive government was fourth in the list of people’s priorities, with only education and healthcare and better jobs being rated higher.  But how should we get better governance?</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 05 Feb 2015 13:56:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 6954 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere