Urban Development http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/taxonomy/term/280/all en #1 from 2017: Future jobs for youth in agriculture and food systems: Learning from our backyard in DC http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/1-2017-future-jobs-youth-agriculture-and-food-systems-learning-our-backyard-dc <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <em>Our Top Ten blog posts by readership in 2017. This post was <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/future-jobs-youth-agriculture-and-food-systems-learning-our-backyard-dc" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">originally posted</a> on March 14, 2017.</em><br />  </div> <div> <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_6.jpg" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img alt="" height="305" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/1_6.jpg" style="float:left" title="Growing high value green vegetables using hydroponics, Firebird Farm, Maryland" width="229" /></a>When we think of agriculture and food, we think of a farmer working in a rural area producing food for consumption and selling some surplus.  With growing urbanization and increasing demand for food, food system has moved away from just agricultural production. It involves aggregating, value addition, processing, logistics, food preparation, restaurants and other related services.  Many enterprises from small to large are part of the enterprise ecosystem.  The potential for new jobs for youth who start and are also employed by their enterprises is significant. The Africa Agriculture Innovation Network (AAIN) has developed a business agenda targeting establishment of at least 108 incubators in 54 African countries in the next 5 years focusing on youth and women among other actors. At least 600,000 jobs will be created and 100,000 start-ups and SMEs produced through incubation and 60,000 students exposed to learn as you earn model and mentored to start new businesses.</div> <p> <br /> In recent past, there have been many innovations in areas of technology, extension, ICT, education, and incubation leading to new generation of enterprises and enterprise clusters resulting in the creation of good quality and new jobs in agriculture and food systems. A key challenge in the future is how we create more and better jobs in the agriculture and food system value chain. One of the major requirements for creating more jobs is a radical change in the way youth are taught agriculture and entrepreneurship. The skills required for a modern agriculture and food system are of a higher order and need to be upgraded significantly.</p> <p> As part of the 2017 Global Learning Forum more than 250 staff in the Agriculture Global Practice from around the world are learning how Agriculture and Food Systems are going to look like in future. The group participants visited the Urban Food Hubs Program being managed by the University of the District of Columbia (UDC). The Urban Food Hubs focus on four components: food production, food preparation, food distribution, and waste and water recovery.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 25 Jan 2018 17:01:00 +0000 Iftikhar Mostafa 7778 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Ranking the world’s megacities is a wake-up call for women’s rights http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/ranking-world-s-megacities-wake-call-women-s-rights <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> Cities are becoming monsters. Look at the world’s biggest megacities. 38 million people live in Tokyo! Try to take a taxi and find the house of a friend in Japan’s capital. You need luck. Six billion people will live in cities by 2045.<br /><br /><img alt="" height="428" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/26641124124_1e61d94666_z.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="342" />Cities are the new states; today, many of the world’s 31 megacities have larger populations and economies than individual nations.<br /><br /> For many people, these big urban centers represent the land of opportunity, offering better chances of employment, increased access to education and health services, social mobility.  For many others it’s a daily struggle for survival. In all big cities, the inequality between rich and poor has become gigantic and the divide seems only to grow.<br /><br /> We conducted a poll to investigate one aspect: how do women perceive their life in the world’s megacities? We chose women because they are the real economic accelerators, re-investing 90% of their salary into their families. When a woman thrives, her immediate community thrives with her.<br /><br /> Throughout June and July, we asked 380 gender experts in the 19 countries hosting the world’s biggest megacities to identify in which they thought women fared best and worst. The findings were eye-opening. They returned a truly compelling snapshot of the wider issues faced by women: from sexual violence, to security, to access to reproductive rights, from the risks of harmful cultural practices, to the lack of access to economic opportunities.<br /><br /> London was voted the world’s most female-friendly metropolis, thanks to its provision of free healthcare and access to economic resources such as education and financial services.  Tokyo and Paris came second and third.<br /><br /> But when we look at what concerned women most, the poll offers proper food for thought. In London, for example, experts cited the gender pay gap (a recent study by the Chartered Management Institute and XpertHR found on average, women earned £12,000 less than their male counterparts, while just 26% of director-led roles are filled by women as opposed to 74% by men) as well as extortionate childcare costs, as two of the major issues facing women today.<br />  </div> </div></div></div> Fri, 03 Nov 2017 20:15:00 +0000 Monique Villa 7759 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere How do you make aid programmes truly adaptive? New lessons from Bangladesh and Cambodia http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/how-do-you-make-aid-programmes-truly-adaptive-new-lessons-bangladesh-and-cambodia <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img alt="Lisa Denney" height="100" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/lisa-profile-pic-150x150.jpg" style="float:left" title="Lisa Denney" width="100" /><img alt="Daniel Harris" height="100" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/dan-profile-pic-150x150.png" style="float:left" title="Daniel Harris" width="100" /><img alt="Leni Wild" height="100" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/leni-wild-150x150.jpg" style="float:left" title="Leni Wild" width="100" /><p> <em>Following on from <a href="http://oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/what-is-adaptive-aid-useful-lessons-from-six-case-studies/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">yesterday’s post</a> on adaptive aid, a guest piece from <a href="https://www.odi.org/experts/848-lisa-denney" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Lisa Denney</a> (far left), <a href="https://www.odi.org/experts/426-daniel-harris" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Daniel Harris</a> (middle) and <a href="https://www.odi.org/experts/554-leni-wild" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Leni Wild</a> (near left), all of ODI.</em></p> <p> A swelling chorus of the development community has been advocating for more <a href="https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/9158.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">flexible</a> and adaptive programming that can respond to the twists and turns of political reform processes. They argue that in order to achieve better aid outcomes, we need to <a href="https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion-files/9437.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">do development differently</a>. As part of this agenda, <a href="https://www.odi.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">ODI</a> and <a href="http://asiafoundation.org/publication/reforming-solid-waste-management-phnom-penh/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The Asia Foundation</a>, with the assistance of the <a href="http://dfat.gov.au/pages/default.aspx" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade</a>, tracked and analysed three programmes in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Mongolia. These programmes explicitly sought to <a href="http://asiafoundation.org/2016/06/23/asia-foundation-overseas-development-institute-release-case-studies-working-politically-practice-series/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">work politically in practice</a>, using a relatively small amount of money, a relatively short timeframe, and a focus on tangible changes. We followed attempts to achieve environmental compliance and increase exports in the leather sector in <a href="http://asiafoundation.org/publication/leather-sector-reform-bangladesh/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Bangladesh</a>, and to improve solid waste management in <a href="http://asiafoundation.org/publication/reforming-solid-waste-management-phnom-penh/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Cambodia</a> and Mongolia; issues identified for their potential to make important contributions (economic, health, environmental, etc.) to the wellbeing of citizens. Two of our case studies were <a href="http://asiafoundation.org/2016/06/23/asia-foundation-overseas-development-institute-release-case-studies-working-politically-practice-series/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">released this month</a>, telling the story of how the reforms unfolded and shifted strategy to better leverage the incentives of influential stakeholders, as well as the mechanics of how the Foundation supported adaptive ways of working.<br />  </p> <p> <strong>How adaptation worked in practice</strong></p> <p> <img alt="" height="210" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/2760562942_36ff2ebe84_z.jpg" style="float:right" title=" © Masaru Goto / World Bank" width="320" />In each case, the programme teams (led by staff in the Foundation’s local office, and supported by a variety of contracted partners and a wider uncontracted reform network reaching both inside and outside of government) made significant changes to strategy <em>during </em>the implementation phase that helped to address difficult, multidimensional problems. In Cambodia, the team faced a complex and often opaque challenge in which waste collection is characterized by a single company with a long-term confidential contract that is difficult to monitor, a fee structure that does not encourage improved household waste collection, garbage collectors whose conditions do not incentivize performance, and communities that are difficult to access and do not always understand the importance of sanitary waste disposal. With a small Foundation team and limited funding, the approach relied on working with individuals selected as much for personal connections, disposition, and political know-how in working politically and flexibly, as for technical knowledge. The team began by cultivating relations between City Hall and the single contractor providing solid waste management services, then moved to work with the sole provider to improve their delivery, and finally, resolved to end the single contractor model in favour of competition.</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 23 Aug 2016 16:43:00 +0000 Duncan Green 7494 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-268 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> <img alt="World of News" height="179" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title=" Flickr user fdecomit" width="180" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span></h4> <p> <strong><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2016/jun/28/rapid-urbanisation-threatens-global-health-more-people-less-space-population-infectious-disease" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">More people in less space: rapid urbanisation threatens global health</a><br /> The Guardian</strong><br /> The global population looks set to rise to 9.7 billion people by 2050, when it is expected that more than two-thirds of humanity will be living in urban areas. The global health community is bracing itself. Compared to a more traditional rural existence, the shift in lifestyle and inevitable increase in exposure to pollution will lead to significant long-term rises in non-communicable diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. Worrying as this prospect may be, current population trends are already altering the global health landscape even faster than we realise, and that could pose far bigger and more immediate problems. When population growth is combined with other pressures, such as climate change and human migration, some parts of the world are likely to experience unprecedented levels of urban density.<br /><br /><a href="http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/06/30/how-being-stateless-makes-you-poor/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>How Being Stateless Makes You Poor</strong></a><br /><strong>Foreign Policy</strong><br /> For the first 24 years of his life, third-generation Palestinian refugee Waseem Khrtabeel rarely noticed any difference between himself and his Syrian neighbors. Like his parents, Khrtabeel was born and raised in Damascus. He speaks with a distinct Syrian accent, just like that of his many Syrian friends. But Khrtabeel is not like other Syrians. He’s stateless.The first time Khrtabeel, 30, grasped the magnitude of that word was in early 2010, after graduating from Damascus University with a mechanical engineering degree. Khrtabeel was elated when he secured an interview with the Saudi Binladin Group, one of Saudi Arabia’s most prominent construction companies. On an unseasonably warm day in January, he arrived at the company’s recruiting office in southwestern Damascus promptly at 2 p.m., energized and confident. He was shown the door less than seven minutes later.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 07 Jul 2016 13:55:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7452 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-267 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="World of News" height="179" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title=" Flickr user fdecomit" width="180" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span></p> <div> <br /><strong><a href="http://www.civicus.org/index.php/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">State of Civil Society Report</a></strong></div> <div> <strong>CIVICUS</strong></div> <div> The 2016 State of Civil Society Report, produced by CIVICUS, provides a comprehensive `year in review’ as well as 33 guest essays focusing on the topic of exclusion. Addressing exclusion is an urgent political issue, which gained renewed emphasis with the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals in 2015. In the past year, civil society responded to profound human rights abuses caused by conflicts and worked to alleviate human suffering in the wake of disasters, yet faces major challenges including dubious attempts to silence dissenting voices. CIVICUS documented serious violations of the freedoms of association, expression and peaceful assembly in 109 countries over the course of 2015. In an increasingly unequal world where human rights are being undermined, civil society is challenging exclusion in innovative ways.<br />  </div> <p> <strong><a href="http://science.sciencemag.org/content/352/6288/873.full?IntCmp=urban_video-28" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Leave no city behind</a><br /> Science Magazine</strong><br /> Close to 4 billion people live in cities. As the driver of environmental challenges, accounting for nearly 70% of the world's carbon emissions, and as sites of critical social disparities, with 863 million dwellers now living in slums, urban settlements are at the heart of global change. This momentum is unlikely to disappear, as approximately 70 million more people will move to cities by the end of this year alone. The good news is that recent multilateral processes are now appreciating this key role of cities and are increasingly prioritizing urban concerns in policy-making. Yet, how can we ensure that these steps toward a global urban governance leave no city, town, or urban dweller behind?</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 30 Jun 2016 14:11:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7447 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-265 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> <img alt="World of News" height="179" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title=" Flickr user fdecomit" width="180" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span></h4> <div style="margin:0in 0in 0pt"> <strong><a href="https://bostonreview.net/world/alex-de-waal-writing-human-rights" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Writing Human Rights and Getting It Wrong</a></strong></div> <div style="margin:0in 0in 0pt"> <strong>Boston Review</strong></div> <div style="margin:0in 0in 0pt"> The power to accuse someone of a grave crime on the basis of hearsay is a heady one. I have done it, and I faced the consequences of being wrong. Twenty years ago in the Nuba Mountains of central Sudan, I met a man, Chief Hussein Karbus, whose murder I had reported three years earlier. He was introduced to me by the man I had accused of ordering his death, a leader of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army. The mistake had appeared in a report I authored for Human Rights Watch; it was the kind of error that human rights researchers sometimes make and rarely admit. The three of us sat together and laughed about it. Not all such missteps turn out so well.</div> <div style="margin:0in 0in 0pt">  </div> <div style="margin:0in 0in 0pt"> <strong><a href="http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/06/07/when-your-city-knows-everything-about-you-internet-of-things/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Soon Your City Will Know Everything About You</a></strong></div> <div style="margin:0in 0in 0pt"> <strong>Foreign Policy</strong></div> <div style="margin:0in 0in 0pt"> They call it “the Internet of Things” — the rapidly growing network of everyday objects equipped with sensors, tiny power supplies, and internet addresses. Within a few years, we will be immersed in a world of these connected devices. The best estimates suggest that there will be about 60 billion of them by the year 2020. We’ve already seen internet-accessible sensors implanted in dolls, cars, and cows. Currently, the biggest users of these sensor arrays are in cities, where city governments use them to collect large amounts of policy-relevant data. In Los Angeles, the crowdsourced traffic and navigation app Waze collects data that helps residents navigate the city’s choked highway networks. In Chicago, an ambitious program makes public data available to startups eager to build apps for residents. The city’s 49th ward has been experimenting with participatory budgeting and online voting to take the pulse of the community on policy issues. Chicago has also been developing the “Array of Things,” a network of sensors that track, among other things, the urban conditions that affect bronchitis.</div> <div style="margin:0in 0in 0pt">  </div> </div></div></div> Thu, 16 Jun 2016 14:12:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7431 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign Art: Using the hot road to cook a meal http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-using-hot-road-cook-meal <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><strong>People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</strong><br /><br /> As per <a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/GlobalWarming/page2.php" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">NASA’s definition</a>, global warming is “the unusually rapid increase in Earth’s average surface temperature over the past century primarily due to the greenhouse gases released as people burn fossil fuels.” This increase in temperature has <a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/GlobalWarming/page3.php" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">grown exponentially</a> in recent times. According to a <a href="http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2014/11/23/climate-report-finds-temperature-rise-locked-in-risks-rising" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Bank report</a>, warming of close to 1.5°C above pre-industrial times is already locked into Earth’s atmospheric system by past and predicted greenhouse gas emissions.<br /><br /> This rise in temperatures is most notable in cities due to the so-called “<a href="http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/city-hotter-countryside-urban-heat-island-science-180951985/?no-ist" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">urban heat island</a>” effect. This is caused by the concentration of people, vehicles, buildings and machinery, all of which generate heat. However, the biggest contributor to the urban heat island effect is the replacement of plants by concrete, according to the Smithsonian’s article.<br /><br /> Deforestation and increased pollution have caused Paraguay’s capital Asunción to be recognized as the hottest city in the world. World Wildlife Fund had an interesting idea to raise awareness amongst Paraguayans about the dangerous effects of global warming. With a local chef, they organized an outdoor restaurant with a “Global Warming menu” cooked directly on the hot asphalt of the street.<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-249 asset-video"> <strong > WWF Global Warming Menu </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="640" height="360" data="//www.youtube.com/v/rZNiP2ufp_Q?wmode=transparent"> <param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/rZNiP2ufp_Q?wmode=transparent" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> </object> </div></div></div></div> </div></div></div></div> Wed, 16 Mar 2016 18:34:00 +0000 Davinia Levy 7340 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Spike Lee’s ‘Chi-Raq’: The Maestro Handles Complexity Adroitly http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/spike-lee-s-chi-raq-maestro-handles-complexity-adroitly <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="Chi-Raq movie bill" height="182" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/chi-raq-image.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="280" />Difficult social problems are fiendishly difficult to communicate. For, these are issues about which experts disagree and citizen-voters, too. The causes are unclear, the solutions are unclear, and then there is the ideological deadweight that tends to drag meaningful debate and discussion all the way down to seedy depths. Above all, public debate on complex social problems also leads to framing battles: you frame the discussion to privilege the ‘solution’ you want. So, for instance: what do we do about homelessness in our cities? If you don’t want public funds spent on it, you frame it as an individual responsibility issue. You argue that the homeless need to pull themselves up by the straps of their dirty sneakers. If you want public funds spent on the problem, you frame the issue as a structural challenge. You ask for a focus on unemployment, targeted welfare schemes, improved care for the mentally ill and so on.<br /><br /> ‘<a href="http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/chi-raq-2015" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Chi-Raq’</a>, Spike Lee’s new movie, tackles a horrendously difficult problem: the horrific and persistent gang violence in inner cities in the United States of America (and, by implication, several such places across the globe). His setting is the South Side of Chicago. The title of the movie is a play on Chicago and Iraq. The movie opens with these stunning statistics: while American deaths in the Iraq War between 2003 and 2011 came to 4,424, between 2001 and 2015 there were 7,356 homicides in Chicago. Think about that for a second: 7,356 homicides.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 17 Dec 2015 17:24:00 +0000 Sina Odugbemi 7253 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-238 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <p> <img alt="World of News" height="139" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="140" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span><br />  </p> <p> <strong><a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/3052875/malala-strikes-back-behind-the-scenes-of-her-fearless-organization" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Malala Strikes Back: Behind the Scenes of her Fearless, Fast-Growing Organization</a></strong><br /> Fast Co.Exist<br /> After Pope Francis finishes his opening remarks at the UN General Assembly, the room’s attention quickly begins to stray. Colombian pop star and UNICEF ambassador Shakira launches into a well-intentioned rendition of "Imagine," but the gathered heads of state begin to twist in their seats in conversation and mill in the aisles. Then the song ends, and a gentle but firm voice calls down from the upper mezzanine balcony, cutting through the buzz of distraction. "Before I start, may I ask for some quiet. Please pay attention to what youth is asking here."  Chastened, the world leaders take their seats. In elegantly simple language, 18-year-old Malala Yousafzai implores the adults below—who have convened to adopt a series of development goals for the world’s most underserved communities—to follow through on their promise to deliver free, safe, quality education for children across the globe.</p> <p> <strong><a href="http://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/nov/13/five-reasons-funding-should-go-directly-to-local-ngos" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Five reasons funding should go directly to local NGOs</a></strong><br /> Guardian<br /> A cohort of small villages comes together to lobby for protection of a local forest upon which they depend. A group of church women gather under a tree to plan for how they will get orphaned children back into school. A self-help group forms a cooperative to get better prices for their products. Dhananjayan Sriskandarajah’s discussion of why donors seem unable or unwilling to directly fund local organisations like these was certainly indicative of the international aid and philanthropy world. As he also mentioned, there is a growing community of international small grantmakers that know how to find and fund effective grassroots initiatives. Here’s why we focus our efforts on getting funding down to local NGOs<br /><br /></div></div></div> Thu, 19 Nov 2015 15:37:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7225 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-237 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <div style="margin:0px; padding:0px; border:0px currentColor; vertical-align:baseline"> <p> <img alt="World of News" height="139" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="140" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p> <br /><a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2015/11/libraries_are_changing_international_development.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>The Library’s Global Future</strong></a><br /> Slate<br /> Discussions of the future of libraries are often surprisingly nostalgic endeavors, producing laments for vanished card catalogs or shrinking book stacks rather than visions of what might be. Even at their most hopeful, such conversations sometimes lose track of the pragmatic functions that libraries serve. Imagined as unchanging archives, libraries become mere monuments to our analog past. But envisioning them as purely digital spaces also misses the mark, capturing neither what they can be nor the way their patrons use them.</p> <p> <strong><a href="http://theconversation.com/the-worlds-urban-population-is-growing-so-how-can-cities-plan-for-migrants-49931" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">The world’s urban population is growing – so how can cities plan for migrants?</a></strong><br /> The Conversation<br /> The world’s population is becoming increasingly urban. Sometime in 2007 is usually reckoned to be the turning point when city dwellers formed the majority of the global population for the first time in history. Today, the trend toward urbanisation continues: as of 2014, it’s thought that 54% of the world’s population lives in cities – and it’s expected to reach 66% by 2050. Migration forms a significant, and often controversial, part of this urban population growth. In fact, cities grow in three ways, which can be difficult to distinguish: through migration (whether it’s internal migration from rural to urban areas, or international migration between countries); the natural growth of the city’s population; and the reclassification of nearby non-urban districts. Although migration is only responsible for one share of this growth, it varies widely from country to country.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 12 Nov 2015 15:02:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7218 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Global cyclists say NO to carbon - opt for CDM http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/global-cyclists-say-no-carbon-opt-cdm <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <em><img alt="bikes in Ghana" height="186" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/5094790904_2fc7acab8d_z.jpg" style="float:right" title="" width="280" />“Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride.”</em> - John F. Kennedy<br />  <br /><strong>From cradle to grave …</strong><br /><br /> Currently, two billion bicycles are in use around the world. Children, students, professionals, laborers, civil servants and seniors are pedaling around their communities. <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/cycling-everyone-s-business" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">They all experience</a> the freedom and the natural opportunity for exercise that the bicycle easily provides.<br /><br /> That number could rise to as many as five billion bicycles by 2050, especially with the development of the electric bike that we are seeing worldwide. Over 50 percent of the human population knows how to ride a bike, and the annual production of bicycles is now over 100 million per year. In comparison, car production is currently at about 60 million units per year.<br /><br /> The bicycle is unique and deserves to be given a focus by the global community that it surprisingly has not yet received.</p> <p> This is especially true of politicians who often underestimate the power of voters who take their freedom to pedal very seriously. City planners also need to be aware of how the bicycle contributes to decreased congestion and improved urban livability worldwide. There are, however, some wonderful exceptions such as the Mayor of London, <a href="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/road-towards-un-climate-change-conference-paris" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Boris Johnson</a>, Rome mayor, Ignazio Marino, Taipei mayor, Ko Wen-je, the 108<sup>th</sup> Mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg, Paris mayor, Anne Hildalgo, Rio de Janeiro mayor, Eduardo Paes, and former Washington DC mayor, Adrian Fenty who recognize the importance of incorporating bikes into city planning.<br /><br /> Many countries and cities already share best practices on how to become more cycling friendly. A process that the <a href="http://www.ecf.com" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">European Cyclists’ Federation</a> and <a href="http://www.ecf.com/world-cycling-alliance/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">World Cycling Alliance</a> is heavily engaged in, which recently lead to the EU ministers of Transport agreeing in a groundbreaking “<a href="http://www.eu2015lu.eu/en/actualites/communiques/2015/10/07-info-transports-declaration-velo/07-Info-Transport-Declaration-of-Luxembourg-on-Cycling-as-a-climate-friendly-Transport-Mode---2015-10-06.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">declaration on cycling as a climate friendly transport mode</a>” at a meeting in Luxembourg in early October 2015.<br /><br /> The former mayor of Munich, Christian Ude once said, <em>"Do we want people in leading positions that are too scared to cross a city center on a bicycle? Of course not.  Let cyclists get at it!”  </em>Cyclists – as citizens - tend to be a very organized and active group with bulk voting power that could be unleashed at any time to advocate for global policy change.<br /></div></div></div> Tue, 27 Oct 2015 16:15:00 +0000 Leszek J. Sibilski 7200 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-232 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img alt="World of News" height="139" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="padding:2px; border:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); vertical-align:bottom; max-width:none; float:right" title="" width="140" /><span>These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.</span> <p> <br /><a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2015/09/energy-access-sdgs-un-climate-change/407734/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>If Everyone Gets Electricity, Can the Planet Survive?</strong></a><br /> The Atlantic<br /> Last week, the vast majority of the world’s prime ministers and presidents, along with the odd pontiff and monarch, gathered in New York to sign up to the <a href="https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/topics" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">United Nations Sustainable Development Goals</a> (SDGs). Across <a href="https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/transformingourworld" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">169 targets</a>, the SDGs declare the global aspiration to end poverty and malnutrition, slash child mortality, and guarantee universal secondary education by 2030. And they also call for universal access to modern energy alongside taking “urgent action to combat climate change.” These last two targets are surely important, but they conflict, too: More electricity production is likely to mean more greenhouse-gas emissions.<br /><br /><strong><a href="http://www.developingtelecoms.com/business/connected-citizens.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Special Report: Connected Citizens - Managing Crisis</a></strong><br /> Developing Telecomms<br /> As connectivity extends to the remotest parts of the world an unprecedented and transformational development of ICT knowledge and skills is taking place. This is resulting in an urgent reappraisal of the ways in which crisis situations are managed and to the concept of 'disaster relief'.  Connected citizens become proactive partners in crisis management and recovery, finding ICT based solutions to problems, guiding and channelling emergency relief efforts and leading rebuilding activities.</p> </div></div></div> Thu, 08 Oct 2015 14:34:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7181 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Campaign art: The world needs your voice http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/campaign-art-world-needs-your-voice <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h4> People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.</h4> After nearly three years of global consultations and  negotiations, the SDGs are expected to be adopted by UN member states at a special summit convened at the UN headquarters from 25 to 27 September. The event is part of the larger  program of the annual United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), which begins 15 September.  <br /><br /> The new framework, <a href="https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/transformingourworld" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Transforming Our World: 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development</a>, consists of a Declaration, 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets, a section on means of implementation and renewed global partnership, and a framework for review and follow-up. It was agreed to by the 193 Member States of the UN and will build upon the millennium development goals<br /><br /> The <a href="http://www.globalgoals.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Global Goals</a> campaign, launched at UN Headquarters earlier this month, aims to inform 7 billion people in 7 days about the Global Goals for Sustainable Development. As part of this, the campaign is creating a crowd-sourced video, calling on the global public to record videos of themselves reading their favorite global goal, take a photo that demonstrates that goal, or otherwise creatively visualize their SDG of choice.<br /><br /> The youth in the video ask viewers to, “Film yourself delivering the goal that resonates with <em>you</em>.  We will put it all together with thousands of your faces, voices, and all of our collective hope to create a film and show it to the world on TV, online, and live."<br />  <div class="asset-wrapper asset aid-197 asset-video"> <strong > &#039;We The People&#039; </strong> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-file field-type-emvideo field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><iframe width="774" height="435" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/xxYUw51xDc4?wmode=transparent&wmode=opaque" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-asset-video-desc field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"></div></div></div></div> </div> <p> <br /></div></div></div> Wed, 23 Sep 2015 14:26:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7167 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Weekly wire: The global forum http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/weekly-wire-global-forum-218 <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="World of News" height="139" src="http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/Weekly%20Wire%20Photo_1.jpeg" style="float:right" title="" width="140" />These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.<br /><br /><strong><a href="http://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/jun/22/corruption-global-poverty-development-politics" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Does talking about corruption make it seem worse?</a></strong><br /> The Guardian<br /> What do most people immediately think of when you ask them why poor countries are poor? We’re pretty confident that it will be corruption. Whether you ask thousands of people in a nationally representative survey, or small focus groups, corruption tops people’s explanations for the persistence of poverty. Indeed, 10 years of research into public perceptions of poverty suggests that corruption “is the only topic related to global poverty which the mass public seem happy to talk about”.  Which is odd, because it’s the absolute last thing that people actually working in development want to talk about.<br />  <br /><strong><a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/africas-moment-to-lead-on-climate/2015/06/19/8d54091e-15eb-11e5-9ddc-e3353542100c_story.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Africa’s moment to lead on climate</a></strong><br /> Washington Post<br /> Climate change is the greatest threat facing humanity today. To avoid catastrophe, we must dramatically reduce the carbon intensity of our modern energy systems, which have set us on a collision course with our planetary boundaries. This is the challenge leading up to three key international events this year: a July summit on financing for new global development goals, another in September to settle on those goals and — crucially — a global meeting in December to frame an agreement, and set meaningful targets, on climate change. But focusing on ambitious global climate goals can mask the existence of real impacts on the ground. Nowhere is this truer than in sub-Saharan Africa.   No region has done less to cause climate change, yet sub-Saharan Africa is experiencing some of the earliest, most severe and most damaging effects. As a result, Africa’s leaders have every reason to support international efforts to address climate change. But these leaders also have to deal urgently with the disturbing reality behind Africa’s tiny carbon footprint: a crushing lack of modern energy.<br />  </p> </div></div></div> Thu, 02 Jul 2015 13:45:00 +0000 Roxanne Bauer 7097 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere Cutting through the Gordian Knot: Analysis of conflict and violence http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/cutting-through-gordian-knot-analysis-conflict-and-violence <div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p> <img alt="Alexander cutting the Gordian Knot" height="189" src="https://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/files/publicsphere/gordianknot.jpg" style="float:left" title="" width="280" />A young Palestinian participating in a violence prevention session during a recent World Bank Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience (GSURR) staff retreat, reminisced that not that long ago the Israeli-Palestinian conflict was the only “hot-spot” in the Middle East. Now, the region is a complex mix of insurrection, armed conflict, political upheaval and displacement. Even for him, unbundling and explaining the drivers and implications of these dynamics can be overwhelming – and a full-time job.<br /> <br /> Increasingly, development actors are asked to take on this task, yet many of the World Bank’s standard analytical approaches are not suitable for this kind of complexity. Meanwhile, academics including Ben Ramalingam (Aid on the Edge of Chaos), Thomas Carothers (Development Aid Confronts Politics) and Lant Pritchet (Escaping Capability Traps Through Problem-driven Adaptive Iteration) all highlight the dangers of external intervention in these “difficult operating environments” without sufficient understanding of the underlying context.<br /> <br /> Ongoing work over the last few years in the Bank’s GSURR Global Practice, completed together with the Fragility Conflict and Violence (FCV) Group, has focused on in-depth analysis of <em>why</em> and <em>how</em> particular countries descend into conflict, the impact of violence, and the factors that can build resilience against these shocks. Some 25 of these “fragility assessments” have been completed and they are all part of an effort to strengthen the overall understanding of the “context complexity” in these countries.</p> </div></div></div> Tue, 16 Jun 2015 16:28:00 +0000 Bernard Harborne 7078 at http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere